University City updates: Veteran’s Memorial service, a community garage sale, Little Free Library and more
by JEMMA SAMALA
Published - 05/22/17 - 09:16 AM | 0 0 comments | 0 0 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Miramar National Cemetery will be hosting a Veteran’s Memorial Service on May 28. / PHOTO BY DIANE AHERN
Miramar National Cemetery will be hosting a Veteran’s Memorial Service on May 28. / PHOTO BY DIANE AHERN
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University City community garage sale The annual University City community garage sale will be Saturday, June 3, from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. The annual event is coordinated and sponsored by Coldwell Banker University City. Signs, advertising and maps are provided free of charge to participants. The deadline to be on the map is May 31. Maps and addresses can be picked up at Coldwell Banker (Vons Shopping Center), 3959 Governor Drive, starting at 7 a.m. on June 3. For UC residents who would like to include their garage sale in this huge event (like this author), contact Coldwell Banker at 858-352-6587 or email coldwellbankeruc@gmail.com. This is by far the best day of the year to go garage sale shopping in UC. You will find a huge variety of items at wonderful prices. Veteran’s Memorial Service Miramar National Cemetery is holding a Veterans Memorial Service at 1 p.m., Sunday, May 28, at the cemetery located at 5795 Nobel Drive. All veterans, active-duty military, and the public are invited. The Veterans Memorial Service is sponsored by the Miramar National Cemetery Support Foundation and coordinated by the director and staff of Miramar National Cemetery. For more information, visit www.miramarcemetery.org/. Music for winds On May 28, the Rose Canyon Harmonie, a wind ensemble made up of current and former members of the La Jolla Symphony Orchestra, will return to University City United Church to perform Charles Gounod’s “Petite Symphony,” Beethoven’s “Rondino,” and Mozart’s “Serenade No. 12.” The program, which begins at 7 p.m., will include a free-will offering benefiting the church and its music program; and lasts for about one hour. UCUC is located at the west end of University City, 2877 Governor Drive. These pieces are beloved works in the wind ensemble repertoire. The Mozart “Serenade” and the Beethoven “Rondino” are written for eight wind players (pairs of oboes, clarinets, horns, and bassoons); the Gounod Petite Symphony adds to this ensemble a flute. The Mozart and Beethoven pieces are very much in the Harmonie wind ensemble tradition, and date from its prime around 1780-90. Charles Gounod’s “Petite Symphony” was written for French flutist Paul Taffanel in 1885, however, it also references the earlier classical styles of Mozart and Beethoven. This is joyful music, full of wonderful melodies and harmonies. Doyle Elementary International Festival On Friday, June 2, Doyle Elementary School will host their annual International Festival from 4 to 7 p.m. Join the festivities on the school's grass field and blacktop for multicultural performances and booths representing a variety of countries. This event is free to the public. Food trucks will be available for purchasing dinner and dessert. For more info, contact Doyle Principal Kimberly Moore at kmoore@sandi.net. Big Book Sale The UC Friends of the Library will be having a Big book sale, with thousands of terrific books in stock at ridiculously low prices. Books include something for every member of the family: children’s books, fiction, non-fiction, cookbooks, biographies, travel books, and much more. Stock up for your summer reading. The Big Book Sale will be held Thursday, June 1, from 1 to 5:30 p.m., Friday and Saturday, June 2 and 3, 9:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. The University Community Branch Library is located at 4155 Governor Drive, 858-552-1655. Good deeds- Little Free Library Speaking of books, all are welcome to visit the beautiful library kiosk located at the entrance to UC’s Pennant Village at 6136 Erlanger St, chartered with the Little Free Library Organization. Please take a book, return a book or donate a book. Pennant Village is an all-age HOA community. They are looking for more children’s books, so any donations would be appreciated. If the kiosk is full, please leave your donated books on the porch across the street at 6137 Erlanger. Pennant Village would like to thank their HOA contractors, PBP Construction and Smith Roofing for their generous donation of time and materials to build this library for us. For more information, visit www.littlefreelibrary.org. There are seven chartered Little Free Libraries in the University City ZIP code of 92122, including one at the UTC Westfield Mall.
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Malashock Dance School’s annual gala funds outreach programs
by LUCIA VITI
Published - 05/21/17 - 04:12 PM | 0 0 comments | 4 4 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Malashock Dance’s fundraising gala, ‘The Art of Dance,’ was held on Saturday, May 13. / PHOTO CONTRIBUTED
Malashock Dance’s fundraising gala, ‘The Art of Dance,’ was held on Saturday, May 13. / PHOTO CONTRIBUTED
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“We dance for laughter, we dance for tears, we dance for madness, we dance for fears, we dance for hopes, we dance for screams, we are the dancers, we create the dreams.” ~Albert Einstein Malashock Dance and the Malashock Dance School kicked off its annual fundraising event, “The Art of Dance” last weekend at San Diego’s Abbey on Fifth. Benefitting the school’s artistic educational outreach and scholarship programs, the iconic dance company, along with its junior counterpart, intermingled fashion, art and dance with a paddle auction.   Founded in 2007 as an additional tier of the dance company, the dance school provides scholarships and educational programs for under-served communities, low-income families, individuals with disabilities, and those simply “inspired to move.” “The Malashock Dance School creates partnerships and programs that enhance the emotional, physical, and artistic development of thousands of children in our community,” said executive director, Molly Puryear. “We empower children through movement and create great dancers and extraordinary people in the process.” According to Puryear, the school has partnered with 25 schools and institutions, “dancing” with 40,000 San Diego students since its inception. Programs serve low-income families and those with disabilities who lack access to free or low-cost arts programming. Instruction sidestep socio-economic barriers and school budget cuts while filling the void of private dance studios in low-income areas. “Malashock dance works closely with public, private and charter school districts,” she said. “Although all schools are required to offer art programs, budget cuts sometimes delete the proper staff. That’s where we come in as a nonprofit and say, ‘Hey we’ll write a grant and raise funds to support our involvement.’ If the school says ‘Yes,’ we’re on board. A contract is written and we expose the entire student body – most often kindergarten through eighth grade – to the arts.” Puryear added that the Liberty Station, Arts District-based school connects dance with more than 4,000 students every year to reach beyond classroom academia. “Our life-changing scholarships and educational outreach programs help students focus, collaborate and problem-solve,” she said. “Including those identified as at risk. We save students by dance. We help to increase test scores, school attendance and student/parent involvement. And we’re the only dance organization in San Diego that provides classes for students with cognitive disabilities. The ‘Art of Dance’ will ensure that we not only continue, but that we expand our outreach programs to other schools. Puryear described her role as executive director as her passion. “We’re the crux for integrating arts education into the role of expanding the arts,” she said. “We’re a professional contemporary dance school that sprinkles outreach residency and dance programs throughout the community. We give kids skills that translate into success in all areas of their lives. For the performing arts to survive, we need to cultivate seeds of interest and access at a young age.” La Jolla-born and bred John Malashock, a former principal dancer for Twyla Tharp’s New York Dance Company, founded Malashock dance in 1988. The undisputed talent performed globally while appearing in the Academy Award-winning film ‘Amadeus,’ television specials and concerts with Mikhail Baryshnikov. Celebrating its 29th season, Malashock tours nationally and internationally when not performing in San Diego. Touting a track record that includes original productions, workshops, art festivals, and dance films, Malashock has also participated in the Emmy Award-winning productions, “The Soul of Saturday Night,” “Love & Murder” and “The Floating World.” Impressive collaborations also include the San Diego Opera, San Diego Symphony, KPBS-TV, Museum of Photographic Arts, San Diego Repertory Theatre, La Jolla Music Society, the Mainly Mozart Festival, Old Globe Theatre, Art of Élan and the La Jolla Playhouse. Malashock and Puryear collectively built the dance school to give back to the community they love. Puryear also noted that both the Malashock Dance Company and School were the first Liberty Station tenants. Liberty Station Arts District has since “created a unique model of a collaborative dance building.” In addition to serving as the home for Malashock Dance, The Dorothea Laub Dance Place now houses the San Diego Dance Theatre, San Diego Ballet, and Neisha’s Dance & Music Academy.
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Country Day baseball team is a loose and talented outfit
by ED PIPER JR.
Published - 05/21/17 - 03:56 PM | 0 0 comments | 1 1 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Brandon Nance, a right-hander for La Jolla Country Day. / PHOTO BY ED PIPER, JR.
Brandon Nance, a right-hander for La Jolla Country Day. / PHOTO BY ED PIPER, JR.
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It really showed on center fielder Josh Howe’s walk-up music in the bottom of the first. “Pretty boy swag, pretty boy swag, pretty boy swag/Girls scream my name when I pretty boy swag.” The whole Country Day baseball team standing in the home dugout, many singing the lyrics, with special emphasis on the word “swag.” Then it stuck its head up again loudly in the bottom of the next inning, players on the bench singing along to catcher Alex Steigerwald’s walk-up leading to his at-bat: “I’d love to change the world/But I don’t know what to do/So I’ll leave it up to you.” As Jacob Frankel, one of eight seniors on the Torreys, said before the game: “We play loose. Sometimes we get too loose. Then the energy isn’t there in the dugout.” But on this night, May 12, Frankel and his teammates bring the energy and shutout visiting Bishop’s 2-0 on a two-hitter by senior ace Brandon Nance, a sweep of Coach John Edman’s team’s three Coastal League games against the rival Knights. Nance, a 6-foot-1-inch right-hander, combined his fastball with a wicked curve, often on the outside corner, for his first complete game victory of the season. The Fordham University commit struck out eight Bishop’s batters, whose team looked pretty overmatched by the Country Day roster. The talented Torreys, sporting four other seniors with college letters of intent, carried a mediocre 14-10 record into this final week of the regular season before the CIF playoffs. But that can partly be explained by the Open Division and Division 1 opposition that Edman’s crew regularly faces: dropping games to Parker, St. Augustine, and Vista, all in the top 20 for the county, and Parker winning all three Coastal games between the two squads. Loose but talented. That’s the word for Country Day. “We’re goofballs,” says senior David Wiley, who almost everyone agrees is the lead goofball. “We play around, but we also are ballplayers. We have our weird side, but we get serious when we need to.” Wiley, a right-hander, will pitch at St. Mary’s College in Gonzaga next year. Ben Petty-Hull, a catcher/infielder, will go to Dixie State in Utah. A.J. Dhus, a pitcher/third baseman, has committed to Wheaton College in Illinois. And finally, Frankel, a pitcher/first baseman, will relocate to Southwestern University in Texas, near Austin. “I was looking at our stats,” said Edman, in his 18th year coaching Country Day. “Our average win this year is by eight runs. Our average loss is by two runs.” His players, with a roster very similar to last year’s when the Torreys placed among the top eight teams in Division 1 and made it into the Open Division playoffs, agree that they haven’t yet clicked. “It’s been up-and-down this year,” says Wylie. “We’ve kind of been here-and-there,” says junior shortstop Carson Greene. “Sometimes the bats aren’t there,” says Frankel, 18. There seems to be a fine line between focus, which can lead into suppressed performance, and looseness, which can unravel. But as far as the potential for things to gel in the upcoming playoffs, “We have the talent to be successful,” Frankel words it, sounding like a veteran attorney. Assistant Robert Grasso, the third-base coach who tutors the outfielders, came in the same year as Edman, the head man, 18 years ago, though their simultaneous hirings “weren’t intentional,” says Grasso. Dan Padgett, the other assistant, would love to talk even more about his players. “Don’t tell Wiley, but I’m going to miss him,” says the bespectacled pitching coach. “He’s one of the best leaders we’ve had here in years. He’s very perceptive about other people. He figures out whether a teammate needs a hug or a kick in the butt. That’s invaluable.” Wiley, who started this week with a 2.19 ERA, holding opposing batters to a .238 batting average, and Nance, owning a 4-1 record with a microscopic 1.28 ERA and .168 opposing batting average, are the two number-ones in Padgett’s stable of arms. Regarding Nance, the pitching coach said before the shutout over Bishop’s, “Brandon, this year, has really settled in. He’s gotten control of himself over the years. He’s very self-aware and a mature individual, like Wiley. It’s very exciting.” You can almost feel the goosebumps on Padgett’s arm as he warms to his subjects. Petty-Hull, who can be very intense in interviews, stands 5-foot-7-inches tall or so. He was dinged after being moved behind the plate in the fourth inning against Bishop’s by a foul tip that rattled his catcher’s mask. “I still hear some ringing in my ears,” he complained after the inning. “Last year we clicked a lot earlier,” said Petty-Hull, who also played on the CIF champion football team. Asked why it’s important to keep it fun for his teammates, the Dixie State baseball commit responded, “That’s what helped our team play well last year. We’re not nervous, giving 100 percent, playing our best.” He then proceeded to virtually fill a book in commenting on each teammate he was asked to describe--a reporter’s dream. Carson Greene, the junior shortstop, made a claim to be a goofball: “I like to keep it loose and dance in the locker room.” Asked if he is a good dancer, he asserted, “I like to think so.” His pregame intensity in an interview matches Petty-Hull’s. The Torreys, ranked 19th on MaxPreps to start the week, would seem headed for placement in the Division 1 playoffs in CIF. Most of Country Day’s players play year-round on club teams, some on Edman’s non-school team, some on other club teams.
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Shores merchants anticipate regaining their streets, business
by DAVE SCHWAB
Published - 05/21/17 - 03:40 PM | 0 0 comments | 1 1 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Discussion at La Jolla Shores Association's May meeting centered around businesses being hard hit by ongoing infrastructure construction, the upcoming annual community fall festival and continuing perceived problems with airplane noise. “Business in the Shores is suffering in the daylight hours with the road closed to the beach since November with construction, construction trucks, noise, confusion for parking, etc.,” said LJSA board member Angie Preisendorfer. “Evenings are better for the restaurants as it quiets down. We're (all) looking forward to the opening of Avenida De La Playa at the end of the month. We hope we do not have to see the construction come back after Labor Day.” LJSA board member Terry Kraszewski, who owns Ocean Girl boutique on Avenida, noted after the meeting that “there is no big plan” to lure business back to Avenida's commercial strip, but added, “We're hoping to get banners finished and up to direct visitors here. And FallFest (will help) to bring our neighbors together. We are just so relieved that construction is almost over and that we will have our street and boat launch open again. I can't tell you how stressful it's been.” On Nov. 7, 2016 a group of nearly 100 Shores business owners and supporters assembled in front of Barbarella restaurant on Avenida de la Playa to protest San Diego's Sewage and Water Department's management of an ongoing project to replace the drain pipes in the street to minimize the flooding there during La Jolla's winter rainy season. The protestors were not so much opposed to the improvement project as they were the department's failure to establish a firm completion date and to meet that date. Some residents/merchants contend the project has been dragging for a number of years, noting each year they are promised a completion. One small-business owner on Avenida estimated their (business) loss at almost 30 percent, largely due to construction impacts. Preisendorfer, who also chairs the Shores Business Improvement District, said planning for Shores annual Fall Fest in October is progressing, though they're having more difficulty than anticipated this year. “Fall Fest is coming along,” Preisendorfer said. “We're still working on plans/permits to close one block for the afternoon on Oct. 15 from 1 to 4 p.m. It's our 10th annual and we want to make it a special event for the La Jolla community, bringing local families back to The Shores after the hectic summer.” In other action: • LJSA voted overwhelmingly to send a letter to the city supporting the perception of some La Jollans that airplane noise over the area is problematic, joining other community groups in the Jewel who are concerned about the situation. • Group chair Nick Lebeouf said he was told by city construction engineer Steve Lindsay that construction crews working in the area “will be out by Memorial Day."
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UC San Diego conducts first large-scale study on ketamine as an antidepressant
by BLAKE BUNCH
Published - 05/21/17 - 09:43 AM | 0 0 comments | 2 2 recommendations | email to a friend | print
The chemical compound for ketamine.
The chemical compound for ketamine.
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Since its introduction in 1962, ketamine, often recognized as an illicit hallucinogenic or dissociative drug, has been used in a wide variety of medical treatments. Researchers from the University of California San Diego and the Skaggs School of Pharmaceutical Sciences recently conducted the first large-scale study examining the benefits of using the drug to treat depression. Utilizing the FDA’s Adverse Effect Reporting System (FAERS), a voluntary database collection system set up in 2004, the researchers formulated data on side-effects associated with clinical trials of the drug as a treatment for pain. Although the effects of ketamine have been widely recorded, most of the information provided was from secondhand information or small studies of under 100 patients. Dr. Ruben Abagyan, Ph.D. professor of pharmacy at UC San Diego, along with pharmacy students Isaac Cohen, Tigran Makunts, and Rabia Atayee, PharmD, associate professor of clinical pharmacy, all at Skaggs School of Pharmacy, weeded through approximately 41,000 cases to collect their data. They then applied a mathematical algorithm to look for statistically significant differences in reported depression symptoms for each patient. “We looked at records regarding the marketing of adverse effects of the drug as a treatment for pain,” said Abagyan. “While the small-scale clinical trials presented information that made the drug appear safe for the market, and even though it was approved, the post-market reporting system led us to believe otherwise.” Adverse effects in the treatment for pain also revealed that most treated reported the lack of common depression as a side effect. One property of ketamine that is suitable for treating depression is its quick onset. The drug, often used as an anesthetic, begins to work instantaneously. This vastly differs from current antidepressants that are on the market, which often take weeks to reach significant levels in a patient’s body. “Current FDA-approved treatments for depression fail for millions of people because they don’t work or don’t work fast enough,” said Abagyan. “This study extends small-scale clinical evidence that ketamine can be used to alleviate depression, and provides needed solid statistical support for wider clinical applications and possibly large-scale clinical trials.” Abagyan noted that in cases where a patient may be dealing with suicidal depression, that a drug with a quick onset is paramount. “The real mechanism on how ketamine works is still unknown,” Abagyan added. “We have some hypothesis, but no real proof. What we do have is the ability to study the drug with many controls. For instance, if we were to inject some into a patient’s neck or vocal cords, it could have two different effects.” This study found that depression symptoms in those taking ketamine dropped by 50 percent. This was with an error margin less than 2 percent, compared to patients who took other drug combinations for pain. Also, those treated with ketamine reported a loss of opioid-associated side effects, such as constipation, compared to patients receiving other pain medications. The team continues to examine data regarding the pharmacological benefits of this drug, which is currently listed as a Schedule III Drug in the U.S.
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