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    SeaWorld’s new dive coaster to be named Emperor
    Nov 21, 2019 | 6810 views | 0 0 comments | 5 5 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Artist's rendering of SeaWorld's new dive coaster Emperor scheduled to open in summer 2020.
    Artist's rendering of SeaWorld's new dive coaster Emperor scheduled to open in summer 2020.
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    SeaWorld has announced Emperor as the name of the park’s new dive coaster scheduled to open in summer 2020. This roller coaster will be the tallest, fastest and longest dive coaster in California, as well as the only floorless dive coaster in the state. Named for the world’s largest penguin, the new coaster will mimic this species’ amazing underwater diving ability. Emperor penguins can dive to a depth of 1,800 feet. Climbing to 153 feet with feet dangling in the air, riders on Emperor will be suspended on a 45-degree angle at the crown of the ride before plunging down a 143-foot facedown vertical drop accelerating to more than 60 miles per hour. Riders will also experience inversions, barrel roll, Immelmann loop, hammerhead turn, and flat spin as they race along the nearly 2,500 feet of track. Each of the floorless ride cars will hold 18 riders in three, six-person rows. This is the first seating configuration of its kind in North America. “There will be no other coaster experience like this in California,” said Marilyn Hannes, SeaWorld San Diego’s park president. “Emperor will both thrill our coaster enthusiasts and also serve as an attraction that educates guests about the importance of animal and conservation issues.” This attraction will highlight an important new animal-conservation partnership between SeaWorld and Penguins International that will focus on penguin awareness and the conservation needs of this aquatic bird. A portion of the proceeds from sales of penguin merchandise at the Emperor retail store will be donated to Penguins International to support their important conservation, education, and research efforts. “We are excited to enter into this partnership with SeaWorld,” said David Schutt, president of Penguins International. “It’s an amazing opportunity that will help advance our penguin conservation programs at several high-priority sites and our public awareness campaigns that highlight the threats penguins face in today’s world.” The new Emperor coaster will be located adjacent to Journey to Atlantis in the southeast corner of the park in an area that is currently a parking lot and will be built by Bolliger & Mabillard, based in Switzerland.
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    Susan G. Komen 3-Day raises funds to fight breast cancer
    by DAVE SCHWAB
    Nov 20, 2019 | 10363 views | 1 1 comments | 14 14 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Susan G. Komen 3-Day participants walk the Mission Bay path at Crown Point Park. DAVE SCHWAB/PENINSULA BEACON
    Susan G. Komen 3-Day participants walk the Mission Bay path at Crown Point Park. DAVE SCHWAB/PENINSULA BEACON
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    Arriving at base camp in Crown Point at dusk on Friday, Nov. 15, Jim Hillmann from San Jose, in the midst of his Susan G. Komen 3-Day walk, reflected on why he returns year after year. “I’m here because my mom passed away from breast cancer in 2004,” Hillmann said, noting San Diego’s Komen Walk is the closest of the seven national regional walks he’s done every year for the past 12. Hillmann said the Komen walk is a transformative experience. “You come out here as a first-time walker, and it doesn’t take long before you realize, ‘I’m part of a bigger community, a community that is here to support each other,’ ” he said. “By the time you're done with three days and 60 miles, you’ve made connections, and now you start feeling the power of that community — and the synergy that comes from that.” The pink-themed, anti-breast cancer, three-day walk is no small feat, any way you look at it. “You’re required to raise $2,300 for every walk,” said Hillmann, adding, “And if you walk multiple cities, it’s $2,300 each walk, $16,100 for all seven.” Hillman hosts four fundraisers — a Bunko parlor game, collecting recyclables, an Oakland A’s baseball game and sales from a commemorative coin and pin —that collectively pay for all seven of his Komen walks. Hillman said, on day one of the Komen walk, which starts in Del Mar and ends in downtown San Diego three days later, that he saw a woman in tears whom he described as “overwhelmed.” “We were there to pick her up, talk with her and support her,” he added. Outfitted with a team shirt, badges, ribbons, buttons and all manner of Komen memorabilia, Hillman pointed out that it’s a real sense of accomplishment for him to walk 420 miles in seven cities over 21 days between August and the end of November. “Every time I walk, at the end, it is just as powerful as the time before,” noted Hillmann. “You’ve accomplished something. You’ve shared your story with new people; they’ve shared their stories. It never gets old for me.”  People have asked Hillman, “How can you do so many walks, and why do you keep coming back?”  To that, he responds, “Because there is so much that I can get out of it. There’s a difference you’ve made, an impact.” Should more people be doing the Komen walk? “Absolutely,” answered Hillmann. “When you see the impact you’re making you go, ‘Whoa, This is what it’s all about.’ By the end of day two, they’re ready to register. ‘Sign me up for year two.’ ” Concluded Hillman of the Komen walk experience: “It’s a life-changer.” Komen 3-Day raises $7 million This past weekend, more than 2,000 participants completed the journey of a lifetime at the Susan G. Komen San Diego 3-Day. Together, passionate women and men walked 60-miles over the course of three days in the fight for a world without breast cancer, raising $5.7 million. The Komen 3-Day is the longest distance one can go in the fight against breast cancer. These men and women each raised a minimum of $2,300 and walked 20 miles a day for three consecutive days, all while educating tens of thousands of people about breast health. The proceeds will support the mission of Susan G. Komen by funding breakthrough research and efforts to ensure all people receive the best health care they need. To date, $140.7 million has been raised in the area through the Komen San Diego 3-Day. “We cannot thank our amazing 3-Day family enough for their time and dedication to this cause,” said Carrie Stovall, Susan G. Komen vice president of events. “Every step they take and every dollar they raise gets us closer to our bold goal of reducing the current number of breast cancer deaths in the U.S. by 50 percent by 2026. San Diego has been so supportive of Susan G. Komen and it’s always an incredible experience to host the 3-Day in this city. San Diego, we thank you!” Participants of the 3-Day have trained and fundraised for several months in preparation for the event, which fosters lifelong friendships and memories while providing the community a moving opportunity to honor those who have battled and for those who continue to fight breast cancer. Participants spent the weekend walking through the San Diego area before concluding with a moving closing ceremony at Waterfront Park. “The 3-Day is all about raising money and spreading awareness,” said 12 ½ year survivor and nine-time walker Debbie Feinberg. “Even if you can’t complete the full 60 miles, you can walk one day for 20 miles or even walk portions of the weekend, it’s all worth it because, in the end, it’s the sense of community and inspiration for survivors, those battling and future generations.”
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    Juliet Gallus
    |
    November 21, 2019
    I USED HERBAL MEDICINE TO CURE MY HERPES VIRUS  I was once a victim of Herpes Virus with lot of outbreaks on my body, I was cured from the Virus by the help of Doctor Ahmed Usman with his Herbal medicine which is very active within 21 days with my Herpes result Negative, confirmed by my doctor that the virus is no longer on my blood. You too can be cured contact him on his official email; drahmedusman5104@gmail.com. He has cure for HIV, Diabetes, Cancer,

    Fibroid,

    Painful joints,

    Hepatitis, Heart disease and Liver disease. 
    Former homeless man finding purpose and friendship at Fanuel Park
    by DAVE SCHWAB
    Nov 17, 2019 | 7268 views | 3 3 comments | 17 17 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Matthew Israel Christian at Fanuel Street Park in Pacific Beach.
    Matthew Israel Christian at Fanuel Street Park in Pacific Beach.
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    Once homeless, Matthew Israel Christian has found a new home — and purpose — in a most unlikely spot: Fanuel Street Park in Pacific Beach. Christian (name legally changed), a New Jersey native, routinely spends his daytime hours cleaning the park on the bay at 4000 Fanuel St. A cross between goodwill ambassador and landscaper, Christian daily sifts playground sand to remove debris, rakes lawns and picks up trash.  Speaking with the very Christian Matthew about Fanuel Park, you quickly grasp the park means a lot more to him than most. “I do feel at ease here, at home,” he said. “It’s a great energy place. It’s very peaceful. If you show up on a day like this where the bay is glistening, kids are happy, and everything seems like it’s right in the world — that’s when you realize this place is special.”  Added Matthew: “I like this kind of work. It's kind of Zen-like where a person can just forget about their problems.” Would Matthew like being compensated for his volunteerism? “I don’t know if I feel comfortable getting paid for this, to be honest with you,” he replied. Matthew takes park uncleanliness personally. “To see the sand being inundated with tree debris, it’s kind of like having a beautiful home and having it fall to disrepair,” he said. “It doesn’t make any sense.” Matthew keeps a scrapbook of cards people have sent him appreciating his clean-up efforts. “If it wasn’t for these people, I don’t know if I could have gotten through being homeless,” he confided. “It’s about hope versus hopelessness. There are people who care. There are a lot of kind people.” Of being unsheltered, Matthew said: “I was homeless sleeping on the sidewalk for 4 1/2 years. That bothered the heck out of my back. I felt like a pariah just because I had financial problems. You’re just trying to find a place, like when it’s raining. It’s very lonely at night. It’s not easy.” By his admission, Matthew has been financially challenged nearly all his life. “My jobs have been mostly driving jobs or lower-skilled manual labor,” he admits, while noting, “I’m 53 years old. I have no criminal record. I’m a normal person coming from a working-class family.” As his friends will attest, Matthew is one of the more atypical unsheltered people you’re ever  likely to run across. “I’ve known Matthew since I moved to PB three years ago,” said Johanna Schnell. “He is a positive, sincere volunteer at the park, focused on keeping the children safe. It goes deeper than sweeping and sifting. When people see Matthew taking care of the park, everyone benefits. His presence truly makes a difference. The park shines brighter when he’s around.”  “He’s just a nice human being,” said Carlee Gee. “He is unassuming, kind, just doing the best he can.”’ “Sometimes, I would bring him food or a backpack of clothes,” said Dorothy Gison. “He gave that backpack to a friend, didn’t use it. He’s very kind, approachable. He’s never asked for money or anything. His neighbors want to help him. We just don’t know how.” “Matthew is a truly special man,” said Peter S., who met Matthew when he moved from Connecticut to PB in 2016 and has since befriended him, offering him both work and lodging. “He has a beautiful soul and a heart of gold… he consistently gives to others less fortunate than himself.” Regarding Matthew’s situation, Peter S. said, “Matthew is challenged in ways that are difficult to define. He’s unable to hold a job, which pays near enough to support him. He has difficulty accepting help.” Nonetheless, Peter S. noted, “Matthew has proved himself 100% trustworthy, takes care of my home when I travel, has a wonderful relationship with my son, drives my car and is a true friend and de facto member of my family.” Of Matthew’s future, Peter noted: “Matthew should be paid to do what he and the community love, caring for Fanuel Street Park. Government ought to find a grant or position that can pay him enough to be on his own for contributing so wonderfully to our neighborhood.” Matthew proposed his own solution for enhancing city parks maintenance. “I’m hoping they’ll start an adopt-a-park program where people could do raking, sweeping or picking up litter,” he said. “It could be like an army of volunteers making our parks cleaner and safer for kids. It would be a great example.” Regarding his status, Matthew said, “Maybe this is my lot in life. I’m not crazy. Right now I have housing. I’m able to contribute and make a difference. I guess I have to count my blessings. I have faith in the creator, the savior.”  Asked the purpose of life, Matthew answered, “To be a blessing to yourself … and a blessing to other people.” Matthew tithes at least 10% of the money he makes or people give him, to worthy charities.  “That’s what life’s about … being part of the solution,” he concluded. “That’s what’s taught in scripture, being a steward of wherever you are on the planet.” Want to help? Neighbors and Pacific Beach residents can come together to help Matthew Israel Christian at gofundme.com/f/matthew317.
    Comments
    (3)
    Comments-icon Post a Comment
    Juliet Gallus
    |
    November 19, 2019
    I USED HERBAL MEDICINE TO CURE MY HERPES VIRUS  

    I am here to testify of the good work of Doctor Ahmed Usman. I was once a victim of Herpes Virus with lot of outbreaks on my body, I was cured from the Virus by the help of Ahmed Usman with his great Herbal medicine which is very active within 21 days with my Herpes result Negative. The doctors confirmed that the virus is no longer on my blood. You too can be cured contact him on his official email; drahmedusman5104@gmail.com. He has cure for HIV, Diabetes,

    Cancer,

    Fibroid,

    Painful joints, Hepatitis,

    Heart disease and Liver disease. 
    Laurie C
    |
    November 18, 2019
    Yes, Matthew has helped us with yard work over the years. He is a dedicated hard worker and a pleasure to be around. He inspires me to be kinder and more gentle with others. Welcome back, Matthew.
    MarioSG
    |
    November 17, 2019
    Matthew is a great man, he cares deeply for the park and the community. We've known him for 3 years and he is an example of integrity and hard work. He treats our kids with respect in the park and everyone loves him. I hired him a few times and has always done a great job! I hope this article helps him take the next step in his life.
    Pacific Beach artist turns seasoned surfboards into precious paintings
    by VICTORIA DAVIS
    Nov 16, 2019 | 15740 views | 0 0 comments | 19 19 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Pacific Beach native JohnMichael Becker is a surfboard street artist.
    Pacific Beach native JohnMichael Becker is a surfboard street artist.
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    The kitchen, an art studio. The street, a gallery. At least, that’s the case for JohnMichael (Mike) Becker, a Pacific Beach native, and surfboard street artist. “It’s a lot more intimate working outside where people can watch,” said Mike, who makes a business out of taking old, unusable surfboards and turning them into works of art. “People are more likely to come up to you and ask about what you’re working on and why.” While his most common workspace is on the north side, anyone cruising along La Jolla Cove will likely catch a glimpse of Mike hard at work, taking acrylic paints to board and creating scenes of sailboats in the sunset, sharks coasting near the shores and sea turtles gliding above coral reefs. Mike often takes requests on the spot from passerby-turned-customers, as well as lets his younger audiences help with painting the coral reefs. “I’ll let the kids grab the brush and dab a little on the reefs and they get super excited,” said Mike, who was also recruited last year to paint the mural on the side of Ohana Café on Pearl Street. “My nephews and nieces have done parts of my paintings as well.” Mike, who typically charges between $500 and $700 for his boards depending on size, has also been brought a handful of snapped boards. For one, he turned the board’s break into a massive shark bite. “The great whites have been out here since I was a kid,” said Mike. “They’re residents. That’s why I paint them as well.” Mike, age 59, also paints more abstract and unconventional scenes on boards, such as Eddie Van Halen with his Frankenstrat above an exploding a volcano. Mike’s artistic inspirations stem not only from growing up in Pacific Beach during the ’60s and ’70s – swimming with the bat rays in Mission Bay at Crown Point – but also derives from Mike and his wife Julie Becker living in the Hawaii countryside for 20 years, “embraced by the islands, the people and the ‘Aloha’ culture.” “He has always looked for different things to paint on, like shells and old picture frames,” said Julie. “When Mike started doing surfboards, that’s when things went crazy. Everyone wanted one. But I can’t say I’m surprised because he’s been an amazing artist from the beginning.” Mike, who has been “doodling in the books” since Crown Point Jr. Elementary, added, “I used to give everything I made away as gifts to people. It was Julie who inspired me to turn this into a business.” When Mike and Julie moved back to Pacific Beach four years ago to be closer to family, Mike was quick to turn his home on Pacific Beach Drive into both an art studio and a place friends, family and perfect strangers could come to purchase painted boards, shells, motorcycle helmets, and picture frames. Mike puts his painted surfboards out on the front lawn with a window sign that reads, ‘Surf art for sale.’” Anyone is also welcome to walk through the house and into the back yard where mike sands and primes the boards before painting. “We live right next to a stop sign and so people have to stop their cars anyway,” said Julie, an artist herself who creates leather purses made from cowboy boots and denim pockets, all hand-sewn with dental floss. “I’ve seen people just sitting in their cars looking over here. We’ve even gotten visits from park rangers who just want to watch Mike work.” Mike added, “If I can create a little window that people can look in for a few seconds a day, if not longer, and the painting eases whoever is looking at it, then I’m doing my job. If you look at my work and it makes your heart smile, I’m doing what I’m supposed to do here.”
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    Rickaroons are naturally delicious energy bars made in Pacific Beach
    by VICTORIA DAVIS
    Nov 15, 2019 | 7467 views | 1 1 comments | 12 12 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Chocolate Blonde, with dark chocolate and coconut, is Rickaroons’ bestseller.
    Chocolate Blonde, with dark chocolate and coconut, is Rickaroons’ bestseller.
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    Rickaroons were created by Rick LeBeau.
    Rickaroons were created by Rick LeBeau.
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    From whole-wheat to gluten-free, to totally flourless, Pacific Beach’s energy bar company Rickaroons has spent six years trying to perfect an all-natural macaroon recipe that still tastes all good. “You don’t have to convince someone to eat an apple because it’s gluten-free,” said Grant LeBeau, son of Rickaroons creator Rick LeBeau, and co-founder of the company. “It’s the same for us. Rickaroons have ingredients that happen to be gluten-free. “We’re not an imitation of another product. We didn’t try to reverse engineer bread by putting in 50 filler ingredients to get to a bread-like product. Rickaroons are just naturally gluten-free and naturally delicious.” Rickaroons officially began business in 2013 when Grant and Rick began selling their energy bars — made with shredded coconut, coconut palm nectar, cocoa beans, dark chocolate chips, sunflower lecithin, and blended almonds — at local farmers markets. But the original “Rickaroon” was created 12 years before when Rick set out to make a gluten-free cookie for his girlfriend, who at the time was battling multiple sclerosis. “This was back before we had all these gluten-free options and the doctor said she had to cut out gluten from her diet,” said Grant, who was in middle school at the time. “She told my dad, ‘If you love me, you’ll make me a chocolate chip cookie that I can eat.’” Rick — who was also a vegan triathlete — had a cookie business with his girlfriend called “Ultimate Naturals.” The two shared a love for baked goods and his girlfriend’s request for a wheatless cookie became the foundation of Rick’s Rickaroons. Though Ultimate Naturals was not able to be sustained through the 2008 recession, Rick says he, “never stopped improving the recipe for Rickaroons.” “I would make them as often as I would run out, which was usually every couple of weeks,” said Rick. “And I always had the intention of starting up the cookie company again.” In 2012, Rick and Grant joined forces after Grant graduated from college and collaborated with Grant’s sisters, Stevie and Christina Schweighart to help oversee sales, marketing, graphic design, and accounting. Rick, the team’s only baker, began coming up with new flavors like Megaroons, with chia seeds and cacao nibs, Mocha, with dark chocolate espresso, Peanut Butter Protein with peanut butter, pumpkin seed protein and dark chocolate, as well as Mint To Be. “That one’s my favorite,” said Grant. “It’s our answer to a Thin Mint Girl Scout cookie. But our Chocolate Blonde with dark chocolate and coconut, that’s been the best seller since day one.” “I love them all,” added Rick. “Whichever one I’m eating is my favorite.” The Chocolate Blonde, originally called “The Origaroon” was the prototype Rick gave to his girlfriend as her own, custom-made chocolate chip cookie. While she was able to see Rickaroons gain speed up until 2015, Rick’s girlfriend eventually passed away. Rick and Grant make sure Rickaroons stays connected to its roots, participating in fundraisers such as the Susan G. Koman: Race for the Cure, San Diego County Credit Union Walk MS, and Walk MS: San Diego. Rickaroons is also available at more locations than just on Amazon or the company website. Megaroons, Mint To Bes, and Mochas can all be found at Jimbo’s Naturally!, Ocean Beach People’s Organic Food Market, Juice Kaboose, and Cardiff Seaside Market. Each box of Rickaroons holds 12 cookies and is priced at $25. Currently, Rickaroons is also working on a nut-free and chocolate-free line of cookies. “It’s funny how there are so many different groups of people that end up gravitating naturally towards Rickaroons,” said Grant. “We’ve had women tell us that we were their food-of-choice during pregnancy and for breast-feeding because our cookies are higher in plant fat and lower in sugar. So, it’s fun hearing who we end up being supported by and who we end up working for.” Grant added: “Like it says on our site, this all starting for ‘love for a strong woman and a healthy lifestyle.’ We’re excited to continue to share our family’s recipe and mission to feed the world in a way that’s good for the planet, good for their bodies and good for their taste buds.” Are Rickaroons a dessert or a healthy snack? Both. Rickaroons were created by Rick LeBeau as a clean-burning energy food for pre or post workouts. Since LeBeau is both a lifelong health-conscious athlete and a lifelong dessert connoisseur, Rickaroons turned out to be a delicious dessert as well. So eat Rickaroons any time of day and feel good about the dietary choice you've made. For more information, visit rickaroons.com.
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    Catt Fields White
    |
    November 19, 2019
    We love picking up Rickaroons at the Little Italy Mercato farmers market every Saturday!

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