Sdnews rss feed
    Residents have mixed views on Slow Streets program in Pacific Beach
    by DAVE SCHWAB
    Apr 16, 2021 | 689 views | 0 0 comments | 0 0 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Diamond Street is part of the Slow Streets pilot program. PHOTO BY DAVE SCHWAB
    Diamond Street is part of the Slow Streets pilot program. PHOTO BY DAVE SCHWAB
    slideshow

    Some Pacific Beach neighbors want the brakes put on the Slow Streets pilot program on Diamond Street from Mission Boulevard to Haines Street, claiming it is adversely impacting their neighborhood and is no longer needed.

    The Slow Streets pilot program was introduced by former Mayor Kevin Faulconer to make it safer during COVID for San Diegans to walk and bike by creating more space for physical distancing and reducing congested foot traffic at parks, beaches, and outdoor trails. The program involved the City closing select streets to through traffic to optimize pedestrian and cyclist use to prioritize cost-effective transportation for essential workers during a time of economic strain and decreased transit service. This included erecting temporary barriers and signage, allowing residents to move about their neighborhood while practicing safe social distancing.

    But some PB residents, like Jennifer Sprofera on Diamond Street, argue instead that slow streets are less safe and have diminished residents’ safety, privacy and quality of life.

    “In spite of it saying ‘not a through street,’ many (drivers) still use it as such,” said Sprofera. “Because [Diamond] was such a high-traffic street, it made no sense to take that from us. It was the east-west route with protected four-way stops at each intersection and a light to cross over Ingraham. Now drivers using other streets must worry about being T-boned. And on Diamond, when crossing north to south, you must worry about crashing into a bike, scooter, skater or pedestrian in the middle of the road.”

    “Slow streets are a way to encourage walking, biking, skating and other people-powered transportation by creating spaces where driving isn't prioritized,” said Slow Streets supporter and PB resident Katie Machete. “We know that higher-speed roads are more dangerous for everyone, and we consistently hear complaints from the community about speeding in Pacific Beach. Slow Streets are one way to slow drivers down and protect our most vulnerable roadway users, which is especially important on Diamond Street adjacent to PB Middle School and the PB Rec Center.”

    “But Slow Streets offer even more benefits than just safety: over and over we hear how much people love having extra space to exercise, enjoy the outdoors, and connect with their neighbors,” continued Machete. “We hope our Slow Street in Pacific Beach can become a model for other neighborhoods as we rethink the best ways to share our roadway space.”

    Neighbor Cindy Van Voorhis agreed with Sprofera.

    “Making our streets safer and building on a sense of community are excellent motives, but this closure does not achieve these goals, and the City is putting our citizens’ lives and property at risk for this pet project with no merit,” she claimed. “Our streets are not made safer by creating a complex driving pattern with a myriad of new accident-prone opportunities in a community that ranks both fourth and fifth as the most dangerous driving zone in the city with a demographic of densely-populated highest-risk drivers and tourists.”

    Added Van Voorhis: “Diamond Street residents are not safer from criminal behavior or public nuisance because [Slow Streets] creates an increased demand on our already-challenged public and traffic safety resources. This is not eco-friendly because it will cause increased congestion.

    “Our City has not performed due diligence or good-faith efforts to explore the wide-ranging impacts this will have on our community. If this precedent is established, not one resident homeowner in this entire City will be protected from this method of haphazard unilateral drastic remapping of our communities.”
    Proponents on the other hand contend Slow Streets work effectively slowing drivers and protecting vulnerable non-motorized users while opening streets up more equitably to all users.

    PB community activist Regina Sinsky-Crosby concurred with Machete’s view that Slow Streets has successfully promoted traffic safety while encouraging public street access.

    “We have a neighborhood begging for slower streets,” she said. “To get the slow we need, we must celebrate and encourage the City to support the slow we have. The Slow Streets, the PB Pathway and our bike lanes are wonderful starts to a holistic, slow infrastructure. I hope Diamond is not only sustained but the start of more, connected, slow streets in PB.”

    Added Sinsky-Crosby: “PB has a history of telling people what they can’t do. No skateboarding. No scooters. It doesn’t work. Instead, let’s try welcoming these things by creating specific, safe and enjoyable spaces and pathways for all types of mobility and ability to be enjoyed. Diamond Street is doing just that.”

    Neighbors Jessica and Mike Moore believe Slow Streets has had unintended negative consequences on Diamond Street.

    “We are not opposed to Slow Streets, we are opposed to Slow Streets on our densely congested main artery that was done inappropriately with zero input from the community,” said Jessica Moore, adding, “We’re just worried somebody is going to get hurt.”

    “Slow Streets has been in effect for 11 months,” pointed out Mike Moore. “The initial note was that this would be temporary due to an increase in pedestrian and biking activity when the boardwalk was shut down. Diverting traffic to other streets has completely disrupted the natural flow of traffic in PB.”

    Mike Moore added: “Local residents on these streets are ‘not’ happy with the closure of Diamond. [Prior to Slow Streets] we had issues with drivers speeding down our street. There were two dog deaths, a skateboarder hit and numerous car accidents. Five years ago, I worked with the City to designate four-way stops at Missouri and Fanuel and Missouri and Gresham. All other Slow Streets have been canceled throughout the city, except the Diamond closure.”

    “There’s a strong possibility that the City is in violation of California Codes 830/835,” contended Van Voorhis. “Our tax dollars are at stake in this irresponsible behavior because if an accident occurs during this closure, the City will be held liable in a court of law.”

     

     

    Comments
    (0)
    Comments-icon Post a Comment
    No Comments Yet
    Pacific Beach Woman’s Club property sold, to be redeveloped
    by DAVE SCHWAB
    Apr 15, 2021 | 7659 views | 0 0 comments | 3 3 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    The 6,200-square foot lot at 1704 Grand Ave. is a pre-World War I historic home and is 95 percent rehabbed. PHOTO BY DAVE SCHWAB
    The 6,200-square foot lot at 1704 Grand Ave. is a pre-World War I historic home and is 95 percent rehabbed. PHOTO BY DAVE SCHWAB
    slideshow

    Two high-profile historic structures – Pacific Beach Woman’s Club on Hornblend Street and an America Colonial-designed residence on Grand Avenue – are being rehabilitated for reuse by a local real estate investor.

    Escrow recently closed on the century-old PB Woman’s Club located on three parcels at 1721 Hornblend St. The buyer was Ramin Karimi, who also owns the historic 1,750-square foot, barn-style roofed home on the corner of Grand Avenue and Jewell Street.

    Karmi said he purchased the three Hornblend parcels for $1.4 million. “They (Woman’s Club) gave it to us for the lower price when we agreed to let them use the property for the next two years for twice-a-month care for the homeless there via RV showers, and for having their events there a couple of times a year.”

    Karimi has multiple options for adapting the Woman’s Club site. He is nearly done reconstructing the dwelling on Grand and Jewell.

    “The plan is to keep the building, and we have two plans, three really, and we don’t know which route we’re going yet,” Karimi said of his Hornblend property rehabilitation. He added, “We asked the City, and it’s OK with them if we use it as medical offices, splitting the building’s interior with temporary movable walls.”

    Added Karimi: “It’s in a multi-family zone. The City said we could use it as a single-family home or split it up. We can have up to six units on the site. We’re going to split it into three units, each 1,200- to 1,500-square-feet. We might keep the first level as parking and build something on top of that. We’re going to restore it (club building) and keep it the way it is.”

    Karimi’s unsure of the timetable for redeveloping the Woman’s Club, adding it will take months just to get all the permitting to do construction. “I have no idea how long it will take before we can start work,” he pointed out, adding he would consider renting the former building out for weddings and other events. The building has two bathrooms, a kitchen, and a stage.

    The 6,200-square foot lot at 1704 Grand Ave. is a pre-World War I historic home, with a cottage in the rear. It had been listed on the open market for $1 million. It was purchased in a dilapidated state with debris inside.

    The two-story, three-bedroom, and one-bath home was built by the Handley family back in the 1900s. It had been owned and lived in by family members until it was sold to Karimi.

    Of his Grand Avenue investment, Karimi noted: “That was in really bad shape. We’ve worked on it for almost a year, and we’re about 95% done. The architecture of the house, the framing, was amazingly solid, with no termites or bad wood. We didn’t change any of the structure inside.”

    The cottage structure in the back of the Grand Avenue property will be razed. “One plan is to build three units on the backside where the little cottage is now,” Karimi said. “The front of the house has already been fenced and we’re going to keep it the way it is. We plan to advertise it as a historic vacation rental so people all over the country can book it and come and enjoy a 1920s-era home in PB.”

    Karimi’s been active in the PB real estate market for about a decade. He said he purchases historic homes because he finds them “interesting to work on. I like to restore them like old vehicles.” Karimi added homes in his native Persia aren’t considered to be historical until they’re more than 1,500 years old.

    Comments
    (0)
    Comments-icon Post a Comment
    No Comments Yet
    City Council approves curfews at three Pacific Beach parks
    by DAVE SCHWAB
    Apr 15, 2021 | 769 views | 0 0 comments | 4 4 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Fanuel Park on Mission Bay will have a curfew from 10 a.m.-5 p.m. PHOTO BY DAVE SCHWAB
    Fanuel Park on Mission Bay will have a curfew from 10 a.m.-5 p.m. PHOTO BY DAVE SCHWAB
    slideshow

    Increasing crime in parts of Pacific Beach during the evening- and early-morning hours has prompted the beach community to recommend curfews at Fanuel Park, Pacific Beach Library grounds, and Mission Bay Youth Fields.

    That recommendation was approved by an April 6 full City Council vote.

    “The park curfews will go into effect 30 days after the mayor signs the ordinance, and signage will go up by that time,” said Brian White, past president of Pacific Beach Town Council. “This initiative is the result of a nearly two-year-long process, starting with a petition circulated in July 2019 that gathered 504 signatures in two months. Over the past two years, this proposal has been heard by numerous park advisory groups, commissions, and community groups.

    “I'm glad to see the park curfews nearing the final steps toward implementation. These parks experience elevated levels of crime during nighttime hours, and these curfews will be an added tool for residents and police to make the areas safer."

    The following nighttime curfews are now designated: PB Library, 10 p.m.-5 a.m.; Mission Bay Youth Fields, 11 p.m.-6 a.m.; and Fanuel Park, 10 p.m.-5 a.m. Fanuel Park, which is heavily used during the day especially on weekends, needs further approval from the Coastal Commission, which may take longer to initiate.

    “Also due to City budget shortfalls, local volunteer nonprofit Pacific Beach Town Council is paying for signage costs,” added White, who is working with City Parks and Rec on the details.

    PB civic volunteers agree a curfew has become necessary in designated parks.

    Lee Silber, a volunteer at the Bob McEvoy Fields on Grand Avenue, offered some insight into what happens overnight at the Mission Bay Youth Sports Fields where baseball, softball, and soccer for kids is played.

    As the person who maintains the fields and facilities, Silber noted what he finds mornings when he arrives:

    – Needles, crack pipes, human waste, broken glass, and a lot of litter. 

    – Broken equipment, vandalism, graffiti, real damage to the dugouts, scoreboards, and snack shop.

    – Bike parts, shopping carts, and other stolen items left behind. 

    “What this means is I spend a great deal of time dealing with this, which means I have less time to work on the fields,” noted Silber. “Our league has spent hundreds of dollars fixing things that were broken overnight, which is money that could have been used on the kids. This is the crux of the complaint. It’s a field for kids. And it’s not safe.”

    Silber shared one example.

    “Our games often start at 8 a.m. which means the kids arrive at 7 a.m.,” he said. “I was the first one to arrive on a Saturday at 6:30 a.m. and found a man had broken the lock to the dugout and was inside ‘sleeping’ with a needle still stuck in his arm. When I woke him up he went berserk and chased me around (I led him away from where the kids were arriving). Like many of the things that have happened at the fields, it wasn’t reported to the police because the man got on his bike and rode off. But I know we have called the police many times, too.”

    Another PB volunteer, Marcella Teran, addressed her public support for a nighttime curfew at PB Library Park.

    “Our community's crime rates are growing each year,” Teran said. “We are experiencing increasing crime especially in certain areas of  Pacific Beach during the evening and early morning hours. Three parks that are particularly impacted by criminal activity are Fanuel Park, Pacific Beach Library Park, and Mission Bay Youth Fields. 

    “Many people in the nearby neighborhoods have told me they are afraid to walk, jog, or walk their dogs in or close to these parks during the evening- and early-morning hours. I know this to be true. The night-time curfew is a subtle way to help reduce crime, and help people feel safer,” Teran said.

    Comments
    (0)
    Comments-icon Post a Comment
    No Comments Yet
    SeaWorld fireworks reignite noise complaints from residents
    by DAVE SCHWAB
    Apr 15, 2021 | 2853 views | 5 5 comments | 5 5 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    A SeaWorld fireworks show over Mission Bay from earlier this month. PHOTO BY CHRIS MANNERINO
    A SeaWorld fireworks show over Mission Bay from earlier this month. PHOTO BY CHRIS MANNERINO
    slideshow

    The resumption of fireworks this spring at the recently reopened SeaWorld has resurrected longtime opposition to the pyrotechnic displays, which opponents insist can be harmful to both animals (especially dogs) and people.

    SeaWorld, which reopened most rides and exhibits on April 12, restarted nightly fireworks on March 26 through April 11. The fireworks shows, which had been on a long hiatus, will continue on Fridays, Saturdays, and Sundays through May 30.

    That action has prompted a new petition drive launched by a San Diego resident on Change.org. The petition, which was started a couple of weeks ago and has 3,105 signatures as of April 14, states: “The fireworks at SeaWorld constitute animal cruelty. Dogs, cats, and other companion animals don't understand that the terrifying loud bangs are a celebration. SeaWorld claims to be an organization based on animal conservation and education, yet it launches nightly fireworks terrifying and tormenting tens of thousands of animals in the San Diego area.”

    “Dogs, cats, and all animals live in terror every night for miles around,” continues the petition. “Can you imagine what the terrifying booming does to its own animals directly under the thunderous sounds in small tanks reverberating the noises? It is beyond irresponsible for an animal conservation group to be inflicting so much pain and trauma to animals. SeaWorld is notorious for its abuse and neglect of its own animals. It’s not surprising they are completely ignorant to this as well. It’s a disgusting display of ignorance and a complete disregard to animal welfare.”

    Reacting to the petition’s allegations, SeaWorld spokesperson Tracy Spahr answered: “We have always conducted our fireworks, which have been a San Diego spring and summer tradition for more than 25 years, in accordance with City of San Diego noise ordinance (San Diego policy 500-06) that regulates such demonstrations. We try to be mindful of our neighbors and their pets by making sure the program is concluded by 9 or 10 p.m., and always communicate the dates and times of our firework presentations.

    “We do understand that atmospheric conditions can cause sound to travel farther distances,” continued SeaWorld’s response. “But we have no way of telling if those conditions have been different now than from previous years. We’ve also used the same fireworks shells for the past decade and as part of our policy, we don't use any fireworks shells for the sole purpose of making noise (these are called salutes), but limit the shells to the smaller version that result in the colorful burst people can see. From our observations and noise studies, animals are said to be used to the various sounds and different noises in their environment, and are quite desensitized to them.”

    Regarding the impact of noise from fireworks on its marine park animals, SeaWorld previously asserted: “Our firework displays do not impact the animals in our park. The U.S. Department of Agriculture Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service filed a report relating to our animals and fireworks that states that ‘all animals were apparently healthy and there were no aberrant behavioral manifestations noted’ ... as a result of firework activities in the evening during summer. More than 10 years of analysis consistently demonstrate that our fireworks displays, which only last five minutes, are not having a detrimental impact on Mission Bay.”
    There are other, better alternatives to pyrotechnics, states the Change.org petition, adding: “Fireworks are available in silent options. This petition is to encourage SeaWorld to be conscientious about their animals and the tens of thousands of animals around their park that they affect on a nightly basis. Please sign this petition to make a change for their animals and ours.”

    https://www.change.org/p/seaworld-parks-and-entertainment-sea-world-fireworks

    Comments
    (5)
    Comments-icon Post a Comment
    Mike W
    |
    5 Hours Ago
    Modernize, SeaWorld! With what you spend on fireworks, you could likely invest in a synchronized drone light sky show. Lots of ooohs and aaahs without the noise and pollution...with less ongoing expense after the initial investment.
    anonymous
    |
    5 Hours Ago
    The irony of Seaworld to suggest that their purpose is that of the welfare/rehabilitation/healthy captivity of animals/mammals yet... they throw up fireworks at night that terrorize this very group!
    Barbara yashita
    |
    1 Hour Ago
    Yes, Thank you

    You are correct
    Robert Burns
    |
    6 Hours Ago
    A lot of the problem is months of silence. There does not seem to be enough attention given to water (and air) pollution with pyrotechnic toxics. As for noise effects on animals, a competent, non-corrupt City would get independent expert input but that can't be expected in Enron by the Sea.
    Dashiell Riprock
    |
    3 Hours Ago
    Sea World needs to close! It is wrong and evil to profit from animal cruelty!
    Couple leads tours to ‘quirky hidden spots’ in San Diego
    by DAVE SCHWAB
    Apr 14, 2021 | 12559 views | 0 0 comments | 3 3 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Riding Hydro Bikes on Mission Bay. COURTESY PHOTO
    Riding Hydro Bikes on Mission Bay. COURTESY PHOTO
    slideshow

    Darlynne and Marc Menkin migrated from the East Coast to San Diego to re-establish themselves and ended up becoming tour guides, something neither of them had ever considered.

    Darlynne Reyes Menkin was working in broadcast news and her husband Marc had been busy discovering “quirky hidden spots” exploring the shores of North Pacific Beach and Bird Rock.

    “He would come home and tell me about all the really cool places he’d found,” said Darlynne. “Finally he said to me, ‘I think I want to do this tour guide thing.’ I said, ‘Ok, we’ll go for it.’ I’ll help you as much as I can.”

    The couple started doing walking tours on weekends for fun and enjoyed it so much they began to figure out how to earn a living from it.

    “Then a company called us asking if we’d be willing to help them put together a team-building project,” noted Darlynne. “That’s how it started.”

    Now the pair own two sister companies, Out Of The Ordinary Group Adventures for team building, and Where You Want To Be Tours covering guided walking and bicycling tours, which began in 2003.

    “We offer adventures for the public and also for private groups, which are often a family, a group of friends for an outdoor birthday adventure, or meet-up groups and companies looking for a fun team building day outside,” said Darlynne.

    “Our team-building company was actually started in 1996, and as time has gone on we’ve gotten more companies doing it such as Qualcomm, Kaiser, and Sharp,” noted Marc, adding both their companies are under one umbrella. “They go hand in hand,” he said adding, “We do scavenger hunts, one of our best sellers, in Balboa Park and elsewhere. We also do team Olympics, a cooking ‘iron chef’ as well as teaching outrigger racing and sailing. The list goes on, over 30 different team-building concepts for groups who want to play or bond, as well 15 to 20 different experiences for Where You Want To Be.”

    “During this COVID time, outside tours are best, you can easily physically distance in beach communities like La Jolla,” added Darlynne.

    Marc discussed their Hidden Gem Walking Tour.

    “South of La Jolla Village there are some great beaches, like WindanSea, and just some really unusual places, hidden, secret beaches near mansions,” noted Marc. He added, “It’s an easy two-hour, four-mile walking tour with no steep hills. We know all the great spots, on top of the cliffs and the tidepools. We’ve gotten good feedback on our secret beaches and canyons tours. We show people where they can go to take a walk or bike ride.”

    “We get very excited about being able to show these places to local people, or when they have their families in town,” noted Darlynne. “We get jazzed about empowering them.”

    Their clientele is diverse, said Darlynne.

    “It’s leisure family tours as well as corporate and local groups and companies, tourists visiting, birthday parties and school reunions,” she said. “People want to be outside.”

    Marc said they’re planning to begin bicycle and electric bike tours soon in North PB and Bird Rock. “It will be a 12- to 15-mile tour with stops along the way,” he said, adding similar tours are planned in Mission Beach and Sunset Cliffs.

    Darlynne pointed out people want something extraordinary in a group tour.

    “They don’t want canned tours,” she said. “They want something that really speaks to them, allows them to have some fun with their families, something that is different and unique – a new experience.”

    “We’re ourselves,” noted Darlynne of their success adding, “We also donate our time a lot to the military and faith-based groups.”

    “Right now we’re planning for adventures in the hospitality industry, encouraging people to participate who’ve been in the hard-hit hotel and hospitality industry,” noted Marc.

    The couple feeds off the reactions of guests on their guided tours. “We enjoy being in the moment, observing what people are learning,” Marc concluded.

     

    Info Box:

    What: Darlynne and Marc Menkin group team building, walking, and biking tours

    Contact: groupadventures.com, wheretours.com, 858-487-3418.

    Comments
    (0)
    Comments-icon Post a Comment
    No Comments Yet
    News
    San Diego libraries manufacturing protective gear for healthcare workers
    Continuing efforts to make City resources available in the fight against COVID-19, Mayor Kevin L. Faulconer today announced the San Diego Public Library is producing hundreds of protective face shi...
    Published - Friday, April 10
    full story
    COLUMN – A note to our readers and advertisers
    While we must grudgingly accept the new normal within our community for at least the next few weeks, we are determined to make the best of it. So, please be aware that San Diego Community Newspaper...
    Published - Friday, April 10
    full story
    $1 million granted to San Diego children, seniors impacted by COVID-19
    The San Diego Foundation on April 9 announced $1 million in additional rapid response grants to local nonprofit organizations providing food security and financial assistance to seniors, children, ...
    Published - Thursday, April 09
    full story
    COLUMN – Worried about your immune system? Try these 5 natural remedies
    Body aches, fever, chills and nasal congestion, common symptoms of the flu, can stop you in your tracks, leaving you bedridden for days.   “Complications arising from these illnesses can become ser...
    Published - Thursday, April 09
    full story
    Realtors, civic groups, and schools all still working, albeit remotely
    From schools to planning groups to real estate, everyone is moving forward remotely to observe mandated COVID-19 social-distancing requirements. VIRTUAL HOME TOURS Real-estate agents are using inte...
    Published - Thursday, April 09
    full story
    LETTER TO EDITOR – Reader enjoys La Jolla Village News
    Dear Editor and Publisher: Thank you for the La Jolla Village News I obtained from the CVS at The Shops at La Jolla Village mall. I enjoyed the children's activity page called "Newspaper Fun" with ...
    Published - Thursday, April 09
    full story
    Ocean Beach author pens World War II-era novel
    A. Lee Brown, a retired professor emeritus who hails from Ocean Beach, has added something new to his portfolio: A World War II-era fictional novel titled “The Varsity: America’s Underage Warriors,...
    Published - Wednesday, April 08
    full story
    COLUMN – Community newspapers have your back
    We're in the midst of a global pandemic, but its impact on America’s communities is local. First responders are our neighbors helping our neighbors, rushing to addresses just down the street and ta...
    Published - Wednesday, April 08
    full story
    Point Loma Village and other restaurants and shops still open for business
    While you’re sheltering in place, Point Loma Village and other small businesses want patrons to know they remain open for take-out and delivery of food and other essential services.   - “We are obv...
    Published - Wednesday, April 08
    full story
    How sheltering in place puts domestic abuse victims at risk 
    With Californians ordered to shelter in place to stop the spread of Coronavirus, non-essential workers are trying to stay safe at home. For people who are never really safe at home, because of dome...
    Published - Wednesday, April 08
    full story
    LETTER TO EDITOR – Excellent edition of La Jolla Village News
    Editor: After reading your April 3 issue of La Jolla Village News, I called your office to say how excellent I thought it was. Given that your publication is primarily news and information-oriented...
    Published - Wednesday, April 08
    full story
    Bill Walton and friends will Bike for Humanity to benefit coronavirus victims
    Basketball Hall-of-Famer and San Diego native Bill Walton is teaming up with community leaders and Events.com to host an inter-galactic initiative, Bike for Humanity, on Saturday, April 25, from 9-...
    Published - Tuesday, April 07
    full story
    San Diego region secures $7.1M in state funds for COVID-19 homeless response
    Continuing to take swift action to shelter and house San Diegans amid the COVID-19 pandemic, on April 7 Mayor Kevin L. Faulconer and the City Council secured $3.7 million in state emergency funding...
    Published - Tuesday, April 07
    full story
    Restaurants and businesses that are open for takeout/delivery in the La Mesa and College areas
    Here is a list of some of the restaurants and businesses that are open for takeout/delivery in the La Mesa and College areas. For updated information on businesses, visit their website, social medi...
    Published - Tuesday, April 07
    full story
    Current Issues(Archives)
    La Jolla Village News, April 16th, 2021
    download La Jolla Village News, April 16th, 2021
    La Jolla Village News, April 16th, 2021
    Beach & Bay Press, April 16th, 2021
    download Beach & Bay Press, April 16th, 2021
    Beach & Bay Press, April 16th, 2021
    Mission Times Courier, April 9th, 2021
    download Mission Times Courier, April 9th, 2021
    Mission Times Courier, April 9th, 2021
    College Times Courier, April 9th, 2021
    download College Times Courier, April 9th, 2021
    College Times Courier, April 9th, 2021