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    Tiger Woods commits to play at Farmers Insurance Open
    Jan 16, 2019 | 2780 views | 0 0 comments | 2 2 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Tiger Woods hits out of the rough on a fairway during his Sunday round at last year's Farmers Insurance Open. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    Tiger Woods hits out of the rough on a fairway during his Sunday round at last year's Farmers Insurance Open. / Photo by Thomas Melville
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    Tiger Woods, who capped off a dramatic comeback season with his 80th career PGA Tour victory at the Tour Championship in September, will start his 2019 campaign at Torrey Pines Golf Course. The seven-time winner of the Farmers Insurance Open has committed to play this year’s tournament Jan. 24-27, the Century Club of San Diego announced on Jan. 16. After being limited by back injuries to just two tournaments in the span of more than two full calendar years, Woods made a triumphant comeback in 2018, starting at Torrey Pines. He played 18 tournaments, securing 12 top-25 finishes and seven top-10s – including a pair of runner-up placings and his Tour Championship win, his first victory in more than five years. He finished T6 or better in The Open Championship and the PGA Championship and earned more than $5 million for just the second time in nine seasons. Woods won the Farmers Insurance Open in 1999, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008 and 2013, and earned his most recent major championship victory in a 19-hole playoff at the U.S. Open at Torrey Pines in 2008. In addition to his seven victories at the Farmers Insurance Open, the 80-time PGA TOUR winner has finished in the top 10 six other times in 16 appearances. He is the tournament’s all-time leading money winner, with $6,915,700. “We couldn’t be happier to have Tiger back in our field,” said Century Club of San Diego CEO Peter Ripa. “He really launched his fairytale comeback season right here last January, and he has enjoyed incredible success at Torrey Pines Golf Course and in our tournament over the years. It will be exciting to see him alongside many of the game’s other top players Jan. 24-27.” Until last year, Woods hadn’t played four complete rounds in the Farmers Insurance Open since his last victory here in 2013. After missing the cut during an abbreviated comeback in 2017, he advanced to the weekend last year by making birdie on his 18th hole Friday to make the cut on the number. Rounds of 70 and 72 Saturday and Sunday left him tied for 23rd. He would go on to secure top-10 finishes in the Valspar Championship, the Arnold Palmer Invitational, the Quicken Loans National, The Open Championship, the PGA Championship and the BMW Championship before his season-ending victory at East Lake. “This year as a whole was probably the most rewarding, because there was a point where I just didn't know if I would ever do this again,” Woods said before the Hero World Challenge in November.  “The expectations are much different this upcoming year. Now I know that I can do it, now it's just about managing and making sure I'm fresh for events, because I know I can win tournaments again.”  Twenty years ago, Woods captured his first title at the Farmers Insurance Open. It was his eighth victory on the PGA TOUR but carried extra significance because of the golf course on which he did it. “That was a big win for me because this was the first Tour event that my dad ever took me to, the old Andy Williams,” Woods said. “So for me that was a big deal to win a tournament my dad first took me to.” Woods joins a strong list of early commitments that includes defending champion and World No. 11 Jason Day, World No. 1 and defending FedExCup champion Justin Rose, No. 6 and San Diego native Xander Schauffele, 2017 Farmers Insurance Open winner and World No. 7 Jon Rahm, No. 8 Rory McIlroy, No. 10 Tony Finau, No. 13 Rickie Fowler, No. 15 Patrick Reed, No. 16 Marc Leishman, No. 18 Jordan Spieth, No. 19 Patrick Cantlay, No. 21 Alex Noren, No. 23 Gary Woodland and No. 30 Hideki Matsuyama.  Joining Fowler and Schauffele among San Diego products committed to the Farmers Insurance Open are Torrey Pines High School graduates Pat Perez and Jamie Lovemark, Poway product Charley Hoffman and San Diego State University alum J.J. Spaun. Joining Woods and Rahm as past tournament champions who have committed are Day (2018, 2015), Brandt Snedeker (2016, 2012), Scott Stallings (2014), Ben Crane (2010) and Nick Watney (2009). Young up-and-coming players to watch who have committed include PGA TOUR rookie and long-bomber Cameron Champ and 19-year-old Chilean sensation Joaquin Niemann. The field is not final until the commitment deadline on Friday, Jan. 18 at 5 p.m. ET. In addition to attracting some of the biggest names in the sport, the 2019 Farmers Insurance Open will also feature an array of specialty food and drink offerings showcasing the San Diego flavor and venues to entertain the 100,000-plus spectators who attend the four-day tournament. Areas open to the public include the Grey Goose 19th Hole, which will feature an elevated viewing deck that provides panoramic views of the course, a Pétanque course and specialty drinks including the signature cocktail, the “Torrey Breeze.” Other public areas of interest include the Michelob ULTRA Zone, where fans can enjoy happy hour specials starting at 3 p.m. Thursday through Saturday, and a DJ as part of the Post Party presented by Harrah’s Resort SoCal. Tickets for the 2019 Farmers Insurance Open are on sale and may be purchased at farmersinsuranceopen.com/tickets. Adult grounds tickets are $60, with upgraded VIP tickets starting at $90. With venues selling out last year, fans are encouraged to buy in advance. Discounted tickets are available for seniors, veterans, and youth 13-17. Tickets are complimentary for active duty military, reservists, retired military and dependents. Kids 12 and under are admitted free with a ticketed adult, with a maximum of four kids per adult.
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    Extensive upgrades to Point Loma High to begin next month
    by SCOTT HOPKINS
    Jan 15, 2019 | 5399 views | 0 0 comments | 3 3 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    This view from Chatsworth Boulevard shows what the new three-story building will look like. It will replace an outdated building that is to be demolished. At left is the current 200 Building and at right the current 300 Building, both of which are scheduled for renovation. /  Graphic: San Diego Unified School District
    This view from Chatsworth Boulevard shows what the new three-story building will look like. It will replace an outdated building that is to be demolished. At left is the current 200 Building and at right the current 300 Building, both of which are scheduled for renovation. / Graphic: San Diego Unified School District
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    A scheduled vote by the San Diego Unified School District Board of Education at its Feb. 12 meeting will award a construction contract setting in motion an ambitious modernization of buildings and other improvements on the Point Loma High campus. Following the vote, a notice to proceed will be issued by the district and work will begin. The improvements are being financed with Prop. S funds. One of the first targets on the 94-year-old campus is removal of a round building known as the 800 Building and visible from Chatsworth Boulevard. District architects and planners quickly noted several years ago the structure was outdated. The two-story edifice contains the school's valuable Media Center on the first floor and oddly-shaped classrooms on the second floor that radiate from a center room. The basement contains all of the site's electrical, telephone and computer connections known as the Main Distribution Frame. But despite all this, there are no restrooms in the structure. Moving of these will take place over the coming summer, temporarily removing the school from the electrical grid but with all services back in place for the 2019-20 school year, according to Principal Hans Becker. Teachers from the 800 Building will be moving to temporary classrooms located on the current basketball courts adjacent to the stadium, Becker said. Joining them will be teachers from the current 200 and 300 Buildings, both of which front Chatsworth Boulevard. and  are to be renovated. When that is completed, the 800 Building will be demolished. In its place a new three-story building will rise fronting Chatsworth Boulevard. The building will feature a new media center on the first floor and 10 state-of-the-art classrooms on each of the second and third floors. A multi-functional central outdoor space is also planned for student use. Also coming to Chatsworth Boulevard are new bus turnout spaces to allow for easier traffic flow plus reconfiguration of the main school parking lot on Clove Street, landscape and hardscape improvements, construction of new security enclosures, practice fields and technology upgrades. The district website shows completion of these projects in approximately 18 months. "I'm thinking realistically two school years," Becker said. "I don't see us moving in mid-year. I see delays and unexpected things, so in my mind's eye I'm thinking two years." That timetable would have staff and students occupying the new facilities in August 2021. District officials have studied predicted future student populations at PLHS and are planning these projects to serve those numbers. Current projects nearing completion are the installation of new bleachers in the main gym, installation of new security fencing along Chatsworth Boulevard and a new marquee due to be installed at the intersection of Chatsworth and Voltaire Street by the end of February. Planning for all these undertakings began several years ago with open meetings between district planning and architectural staff and the public. One of the first projects was the controversial lighting of Pete Ross Stadium. Some community members insisted the school's field would be rented out almost nightly to raise funds, causing horrendous noise and other injurious problems. A special field use agreement was adopted by the school board that limited night events at the stadium to 18 per year with lighting turned off by 7 p.m. nightly when student athletic teams are practicing. The district installed computer-aimed LED lighting that has very little spillage into nearby properties. Extra security was brought in on football game nights. Becker followed the agreement stringently, not violating the agreement once. He said  comments from nearby neighbors at mandated follow-up meetings after the first year of lighting resulted in positive feedback from the community.
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    San Diego lifeguards save Seals in dramatic rescue at Sunset Cliffs
    by DAVE SCHWAB
    Jan 11, 2019 | 16189 views | 0 0 comments | 12 12 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    A pair of San Diego Seals professional lacrosse players jumped from The Arch at Sunset Cliffs into a high surf area and had to be rescued.
    A pair of San Diego Seals professional lacrosse players jumped from The Arch at Sunset Cliffs into a high surf area and had to be rescued.
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    One of the San Diego Seals professional lacrosse players clings to a ledge after jumping from The Arch. / Photos by Jim Grant
    One of the San Diego Seals professional lacrosse players clings to a ledge after jumping from The Arch. / Photos by Jim Grant
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    Two recent rescues in wintery storm conditions underscore the need to take extraordinary care whenever surf levels are high. A man died saving his dog in the first incident, which occurred Wednesday, Jan. 9 at 1:50 p.m. at Dog Beach in Ocean Beach. The second incident occurred a day later, on Thursday, Jan. 10 about 10:45 a.m., when a pair of San Diego Seals professional lacrosse players jumped from The Arch at Sunset Cliffs into a high surf area and had to be rescued. Regarding the Jan. 10 incident, San Diego Fire Rescue spokesperson Monica Munoz said lifeguards were notified about two men in their 20s who’d jumped into the water at The Arch – a popular spot for cliff jumpers.  “One was rescued from the water by lifeguards on a rescue craft and taken to OB,” Munoz said. “The other had climbed onto a cliff ledge. Because of high surf, lifeguards and firefighters performed a cliff rescue to get the second person.” Munoz said there were no injuries to either of the two men that required their hospitalization. “It is against San Diego Municipal Code to jump into the Pacific Ocean from a height greater than five feet because it’s dangerous,” said Munoz, noting, “Especially during high surf events, it is not recommended that people get into the water, unless they are swimming near a lifeguard and have a lot of experience as a swimmer.” Of the Jan. 9 incident, Munoz, said: “SDFD Dispatch Center receive a request for help from the channel area at Dog Beach where a man had been swept into the water as he was trying to retrieve his dog from the river channel. Witnesses told lifeguards that he was found face down in the water a few minutes after he went in. “Lifeguards were able to pull him from the water using a rescue water craft,” Munoz said. “They brought him to the beach and started CPR.” The dog either came out of the water on its own or was brought out of the water by someone else, and was eventually taken to family members, noted Munoz. The Medical Examiner's Office later identified the victim as Nevada resident Gregg Owens. He was admitted to UCSD Hospital's intensive care unit where he was later pronounced dead. SDFD lifeguards estimated Owen’s age as somewhere in his 50s or 60s. San Diego lifeguards offer these beach and water safety tips: • Swim near a lifeguard; • Never swim alone; • Supervise children closely, even when lifeguards are present; • Don't rely on flotation devices, such as rafts or inner-tubes;  • If caught in a rip current, swim sideways until free, don't swim against the current's pull; • Do not swim while under the influence of illicit drugs, medications that may cause impairment or alcohol; • Protect your head, neck and spine – don't dive into unfamiliar waters – feet first, first time; • If you are in trouble, call or wave for help; • Follow regulations and lifeguard directions; • Swim parallel to shore if you wish to swim long distances; • Scuba dive only if trained and certified – and within the limits of your experience and training; • Report hazardous conditions to lifeguards or other beach management personnel; • Stay clear of coastal bluffs, they can collapse and cause injury; • Never turn your back to the ocean – you may be swept off coastal bluffs or tide pool areas by waves that can come without warning.
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    Beach & Bay Press top stories in 2018: Scooter invasion, pipeline projects, Bahia Hotel expansion plans, short-term rentals, and Mission Bay’s basketball title
    by EMILY BLACKWOOD
    Jan 09, 2019 | 18054 views | 0 0 comments | 18 18 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Visitors to Pacific Beach attempt to walk on a slackline in mid-November during a beautiful sunset. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    Visitors to Pacific Beach attempt to walk on a slackline in mid-November during a beautiful sunset. / Photo by Thomas Melville
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    Mission Bay beat Foothills Christian, 52-42, at SDSU and won the CIF Open Division title, the school’s first sectional basketball championship since 2007. / THOMAS MELVILLE / BEACH & BAY PRESS
    Mission Bay beat Foothills Christian, 52-42, at SDSU and won the CIF Open Division title, the school’s first sectional basketball championship since 2007. / THOMAS MELVILLE / BEACH & BAY PRESS
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    Motorized scooters were all the rage in Mission Beach in 2018. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    Motorized scooters were all the rage in Mission Beach in 2018. / Photo by Thomas Melville
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    From short-term vacation rentals to trolley stops to RV parks to electric scooters, residents made sure their voices were heard loud and clear when it came to some of the most talked about stories of 2018. Notorious crimes, like the patio furniture thief, were finally solved, and the seemingly endless projects, like Pacific Beach Pipeline Replacement Project, continued to move forward.  January • The San Diego Park and Recreation Board’s Mission Bay Park Committee voted almost unanimously to affirm Evans Hotels’ redevelopment of Bahia Resort Hotel. Locals opposed the expansion, claiming it would decrease parking spaces and public beach access.  • The two owners and a property manager of the Casa De Las Palmas apartment complex in City Heights were charged with misdemeanor health and safety code violations. The seven refugee families who occupied the complex complained that the property had bathroom leaks, inadequate heating, insects, rodents, and improper wiring. • Iron Pig Alehouse in PB stopped serving beverages with plastic straws in an effort to be more environmentally conscious.  • Pacific Beach surfer Ryland Rubens competed in the World Junior Championships in New South Wales, Australia after winning the North America junior tour crown last year. "Competing or not, just being in the ocean is great for many aspects of life,” Rubens said. “Just to take baby steps, because nothing happens overnight."   • A study titled Part 150 was conducted to evaluate flightpath improvements and noise reductions in and around San Diego International Airport. Residents from Point Loma to La Jolla have complained about an increase in noise for the past couple of years.  February  • The Beach & Bay Press went out and sampled all the different kinds of pizzas in San Diego in honor of National Pizza Day on Feb. 9.  • Mayor Kevin L. Faulconer announced early February that San Diego Police Department Assistant Chief David Nisleit would be appointed as the City’s next police chief, replacing Chief Shelley Zimmerman, who retired in March after 35 years on the force. “It is both a privilege and an honor to become the next San Diego police chief,” Nisleit said. “Keeping San Diego one of the safest large cities in America will be one of my top priorities.” • Campland on the Bay achieved the highest occupancy and revenue level in 2017 than in any prior year since 2006. The commercial leasehold opened in 1969 as one of the first in Mission Bay Park.  • Pacific Beach broke ground for a new two-mile segment of the Coastal Rail Trail known as the Rose Creek Bikeway. The construction was part of an effort to provide a more convenient connection between the biking segments in the greater University City area and PB.   • St. Paul’s Lutheran Church and School celebrated its 75th anniversary in Pacific Beach. “The people here are phenomenal,” said James. D. (Pastor Jim) Henkell. “It’s just a neat church to be a part of.”  • Bird electric scooters started popping up in Pacific Beach, resulting in mixed reviews from residents. "These new electric scooters for rent all over PB is getting annoying,” said Dan Michaels, a Pacific Beach business owner, on the Next Door social media site. “Riders are intoxicated renting them, underage, and don't obey any laws of the road.”  • Residents were concerned that the Pacific Beach Pipeline South and West Projects were damaging streets while replacing nearly 39,000 linear feet of water main and nearly 6,800 feet of sewer main. “The patchwork is terrible,” said Dan Bernard. “Ingraham felt like the Belmont Park roller coaster.” March • Mission Bay Bucs beat Foothills Christian 52-42 and won the CIF Open Division title, the school’s first sectional basketball championship since 2007. • A protest was held by Mission Bay residents against the Bahia Resort expansion plans, which would eliminate parking along Gleason Road. Gary Cannon, a retired coastal planner and recreational paddler, called the project, "an attempt to privatize the entire Bahia Point, and to minimize the public’s ability to recreate there.” • Students of Mission Bay High joined the National School Walkout on March 14 to support tougher gun laws and school security following the mass shooting that killed 17 students at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Florida.  • After selling its housing community Luther View, Christ Lutheran Church in Pacific Beach donated $138,000 to community nonprofits such as Doors of Change, Rwandan Orphans Project, and Third Avenue Charitable Organization.  • Three PBMS Mandarin students competed in the Chinese Bridge Contest on March 6, at PBMS. Leah Markworth took first place, and Christopher Santy placed second in language, and the cultural talent award went to Liliana Capalbo. April • Mission Bay and PB residents attended the March for Our Lives rally in downtown San Diego along with thousands of other people advocating for stricter gun laws.  • The infamous Pacific Beach patio bandit was arrested after residents reported patio furniture being stolen from their front porches for several months. Jose Luis Manjarrez-Ledesma, 44, was taken into custody following a traffic stop on March 22. • Locals criticized the dockless bike and motorized scooter “invasion” at the Pacific Beach Town Council on March 21. Representatives from  Ofo, Mobike, LimeBike, and Bird defended the dockless technology, but critics said the scooters’ presence has only created chaos and dangerous situations.  • Pacific Beach civic leaders pushed to move the Tuesday Farmers Market from Bayard Street to Garnet Avenue at the Metropolitan Transit System board meeting.    • MBHS distinguished student Alessandra Garcia was one of nine girls from the United States selected to join the “Girls On Ice: Cascades Expedition team.” She climbed Mt. Baker, an active volcano in the Cascade Mountain range, and studied mountaineering skills, glaciology, and designed biological experiments.    May • The YMCA and San Diego Unified School District held a “ribbon-tying” ceremony to debut the new shared multipurpose field at Pacific Beach Middle School. • SeaWorld's new roller coaster, Electric Eel opened and took the title of Mission Bay’s tallest and fastest roller coaster.  • Paradise Point Resort & Spa in Mission Bay announced its $24 million renovation that includes a remodel of the 44-acre island hotel’s 462 California bungalow-style guest rooms by the award-winning international firm Perkins + Will.  • Members of Team Survivor Sea Dragons collectively celebrated their 10-year anniversaries of surviving cancer with a 26.2-mile fundraising dragon boat paddle around Mission Bay.  • Pioneering surf legends Larry Gordon and Skeeter Malcolm were honored with memorial benches at Tourmaline Surfing Park. Mayor Kevin Faulconer proclaimed May 10, 2018, as “Gordon and Smith Day in the City of San Diego." • Councilmember Lorie Zapf announced she would ask the City Council to endorse an emergency ordinance prohibiting motorized scooters on sidewalks and the boardwalk from Crystal Pier in Pacific Beach to the jetty in South Mission Beach. The City Council members voted against the ban because they either weren’t convinced of its necessity, or they felt the issue hadn’t yet been properly vetted. • I Love A Clean San Diego empowered 1,049 elementary school students, teachers, and volunteers to be a wave of change at Mission Beach for the 25th annual Kids’ Ocean Day.  • Belmont Park’s Giant Dipper was repainted in its original rich coats of red, black and gold.  June • Locals celebrated Go Skateboarding Day on June 21 with skate sessions, barbecues, and competitions. “There is a strong community of skaters,” Paul (Pablo) Smith, owner of Soul Grind Skate Shop in Pacific Beach, said, “but each person has a different style, does unique tricks, and follows a certain brand to express themselves.” • San Diego Mayor Kevin Faulconer announced that construction to replace the West Mission Bay Drive bridge will start in July. The $110 million project would replace the current four-lane bridge, built in the 1950s, with two separate three-lane structures. • The Pacific Beach Planning Group voiced its environmental concerns for the new Balboa Avenue Transit Center. Those concerns included mobility and traffic congestion and mitigation, as well as proposed zoning changes to create higher residential zoning onsite.  • More than 200 students graduated from Mission Bay High School on June 13.  • PB patio thief Jose Luis Ledesma Manjarrez pleaded guilty to five felony counts of grand theft. He was later sentenced to a year in jail. • Mayor Kevin Faulconer released his much anticipated new regulations on short-term vacation rentals that included charging cost-recoverable fees to administer licenses and enforce code violations, establishing a “Good Neighbor” policy, hiring additional staff for complaints about nuisance properties and implementing a per-night fee that would generate an estimated $3 million annually.  July • Mission Beach residents spoke against being "carved out" of the mayor’s rental plan at a special meeting of Mission Beach Precise Planning Board.  • More than 500 volunteers removed 1,493 pounds of trash from beaches after July 4th as a part of the Surfrider Foundation San Diego’s annual post-Fourth of July “Morning After Mess” beach series. • The City Council voted in favor of stricter regulations allowing primary-residence-only rentals with a six-month maximum, which came as a disappointment to local short-term rental industry members who insisted it will negatively impact San Diego tourism.  • San Diego was named the most scenic West Coast city in an Expedia poll. • A 130,000-square-foot International Arrivals facility opened at the San Diego Airport’s Terminal 2 in an effort to allow the airport to accommodate the increase in international passengers resulting from recently added overseas flights. • RV residents rallied at South Shores Park in Mission Bay to demand an end to City policy allowing ticketing and impounding of their vehicles. One of the City ordinances prohibits parking an RV anywhere on City streets and lots between 2 a.m. and 6 a.m. • People complained on NextDoor that homeless who frequent meals served at Pacific Beach Methodist Church are doing drugs and having sex in public parks. • U.S. Rep. Scott Peters (CA-52) defended his co-sponsorship of the Keeping Families Together Act, which would have immediately halted separating families at the U.S.-Mexico border, as the right thing to do. August • The water off La Jolla was 78.8 degrees, according to measurements taken by research scientists at Scripps Institution of Oceanography, a record-setting warm for San Diego. It was nine degrees above the typical temperature for this time of year. • City Council voted 4-2 against putting a proposed Aquatic Safety and Junior Lifeguard Center in Mission Bay Park on the November election ballot. “It’s a long process,” said Corey McClelland, volunteer CEO/board chair of the nonprofit Prevent Drowning Foundation of San Diego. “We’ve been in it for five years, and we’re not going to go away. It’s sorely needed for the students, the lifeguards and San Diego.” • Residents claimed the Neighborhood Parking Protection Ordinance meant to curb abuse by oversized and non-motorized vehicles taking advantage of free residential parking isn’t being enforced in PB.  • Pacific Beach residents raised concerns about severely trimmed trees in the public right-of-way on Garnet Avenue west of Ingraham Street. The City said its staff had not trimmed the trees.  September • Residents voiced safety concerns after the Pacific Beach Library changed their rules to better accommodate the homeless population. “We are a public building serving everyone regardless of their circumstances,” said Misty Jones, San Diego Public Library director. “We have a code of conduct across-the-board for everyone. You can’t be under the influence. You can’t interfere with other library users or staff doing their jobs.” • Share San Diego turned in 62,000 signatures advocating to overturn a 6-3 City Council vote in July for an ordinance limiting short-term rental hosts to primary residences only, with one additional dwelling unit on the same parcel. • RV residents who sued the City to end its policy of ticketing and impounding their vehicles, won a partial victory in court. U.S. District Judge Anthony J. Battaglia ruled that the vehicle habitation ordinance “is both vague on its face and is being arbitrarily and discriminatorily applied.” • I Love A Clean San Diego mobilized 7,000 volunteers at 106 cleanup sites to remove an estimated 130,000 pounds of trash and debris, including a disco ball, 641 golf balls, a snowboard, and fake eyelashes. • A judge sided with McKellar McGowan’s plans to turn the two-acre, long-abandoned Mission Beach Elementary School site into condominiums after Mission Beach Citizens for Responsible Development sued in an effort to overturn the City Council’s 6-2 vote in 2016 approving the project. October • The Beach & Bay Press went out and sampled all the different kinds of tacos in San Diego in honor of National Taco Day on Oct. 4.  • A vacation-rental coalition gained the number of valid signatures required to put their measure — overturning the council vote favoring residents and allowing primary-residence-only rentals with a six-month maximum — on a future ballot. • Gov. Jerry Brown signed a bill absolving adults from being required to wear helmets on electric scooters on city streets. • Campland attended a Pacific Beach Planning Group meeting and pled its case for remaining an affordable bay front campground. It could be a casualty in the City’s ongoing three-year analysis of the 120-acre De Anza Special Study Area, part of developing a De Anza Cove Amendment to the Mission Bay Park Master Plan.  • Troy Horton and Kirra Barth were crowned Homecoming King and Queen at Mission Bay High School. “He is a man about Pacific Beach,” special needs teacher Amanda Logan said of Horton. “He’s Mr. Pacific Beach. He is known, not just on the school campus, but at the little league field, and all around town • San Diego City Council voted 5-3 to ban the use and distribution of styrofoam citywide. • Pacific Beach resident and realtor Kara Kay announced she would be competing on the CBS-produced competitive reality TV series “Survivor: David vs. Goliath.” November • San Diego City Council voted 8-1 to rescind a short-term vacation rental ordinance it passed in July. The re-vote was forced by a successful drive by a vacation-rental coalition to put the measure on a future election ballot. • ReWild Mission Bay released the final conceptual plans for how wetlands can be feasibly restored to protect wildlife and communities. The plans include expanded public access and habitat restoration options, as well as cost estimates and sea-level rise modeling. • The “Pacific Beach Pipeline Replacement Project,” ramped up again, causing traffic disruptions in the coastal communities. • The City Council’s Public Safety and Livable Neighborhoods Committee unanimously endorsed Mayor Faulconer’s proposed new regulations for electric scooters that limit maximum speed in designated zones, encourage rider education, data sharing, operating fees and legal indemnification for the City.  • Mayor Faulconer announced that more than $40 million in infrastructure investments will be made over the next few years in Mission Bay Park, including upgrades to playgrounds, restrooms, and trails as well as environmental projects. • The City announced its preliminary plans to improve Capehart Dog Park in PB, which would cost an estimated $612,000. • Democrat Dr. Jennifer Campbell defeated Republican incumbent Lorie Zapf by a wide margin in the Nov. 6 election for City Council District 2, which encompasses the Peninsula as well as Pacific and Mission beaches, MidwayPacific Highway, Bay Ho, Bay Park and Morena.  December • Mayor Kevin Faulconer sanctioned forming a new joint-powers entity to purchase electrical power to achieve 100 percent renewable energy citywide by 2035.  • A new mobility board was created by the City of San Diego combining two previously existing bicycle advisory and parking advisory boards under the same roof. District 3 Councilmember Chris Ward, who spearheaded the creation of the new mobility board, said: “Innovation in transit and increasing competition for the public right-of-way has fundamentally shifted the way we move ourselves around, meaning the decisions we make will have greater impacts on the quality of life of all San Diegans.” • More than 400 SantaCon participants journeyed through Pacific Beach bars wearing holiday-themed outfits. They donated more than 200 toys and raised more than $2,000 for the Toys for Tots. program.
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    La Jolla Village News’ Year in Review: Children’s Pool upgrades, scooters, illegal ivory, and short-term rentals  
    by EMILY BLACKWOOD
    Jan 05, 2019 | 8490 views | 0 0 comments | 21 21 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    La Jolla Shores recently came in at No. 22 on TripAdvisor’s ‘Top 25 Beaches’ in the U.S. Pacific Beach received some notice as well, ranking No. 20. A vast majority of beaches on the annual list were located in the Southeast, with Clearwater Beach, Fla., taking the No. 1 position. Several other Florida beaches were on this list as well... and, to be expected, three Hawaiian beaches. THOMAS MELVILLE / VILLAGE NEWS
    La Jolla Shores recently came in at No. 22 on TripAdvisor’s ‘Top 25 Beaches’ in the U.S. Pacific Beach received some notice as well, ranking No. 20. A vast majority of beaches on the annual list were located in the Southeast, with Clearwater Beach, Fla., taking the No. 1 position. Several other Florida beaches were on this list as well... and, to be expected, three Hawaiian beaches. THOMAS MELVILLE / VILLAGE NEWS
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    Tiger Woods his out of the rough on hole No. 4  during his round on Sunday, Jan. 28 at the Farmers Insurance Open at Torrey Pines in La Jolla. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    Tiger Woods his out of the rough on hole No. 4 during his round on Sunday, Jan. 28 at the Farmers Insurance Open at Torrey Pines in La Jolla. / Photo by Thomas Melville
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    There was a lot up for debate in 2018. Whether it was trying to get a handle on the seemingly overnight invasion of dockless scooters and bikes, or fighting for more balance within the mayor’s proposal for short-term rentals, residents of La Jolla won a few battles. And those victories were intertwined with the completion of some long-overdue projects like upgrades to the Children’s Pool Plaza, and White Sands Retirement Community’s multi-million dollar renovation.  All in all, it was a good year.  January  • The trial began for the former Marine accused of killing two UC San Diego students in a 2015 crash. Jason Riley King was driving drunk when he struck a car carrying five UC San Diego students; Anne Baldock, 24 and Madison Cornwell, 23, died instantly, and the three other students were injured but survived. The trial lasted 10 days, and the jury ultimately acquitted him of murder and convicted him of two counts of gross vehicular manslaughter while intoxicated. • A La Jolla couple was charged with misdemeanor safety code violations after residents of an apartment complex they maintained reported the building had bathroom leaks, inadequate heating, insects, rodents, and improper wiring. • Tiger Woods made his 2018 debut at the Farmers Insurance Open at historic Torrey Pines Golf Course, the host site of the 2008 and 2021 U.S. Opens. • La Jollan Fernando Aguerre was credited with playing a major role in making surfing a part of the summer Olympics, which will be held in Tokyo in 2020. • Pura Vida Bracelets, a La Jolla-based company that caught the eye of celebrities like Ellen Degeneres and David Beckham, was sued for fraud by a former employee. She claimed that the bracelets were actually produced in El Salvador, not in Costa Rica like the company insinuates.  • Construction began for the viaduct that will carry the Blue Line along Genesee Avenue as part of an 11-mile extension of the trolley line from downtown to University City. • A study titled part 150 was conducted to evaluate flightpath improvements and noise reductions in and around San Diego International Airport. Residents from the Point to La Jolla have complained about an increase in noise for the past couple of years.  • The Dan McKinney Family YMCA completed its $21 million expansion and renovation project, which included a three-story play structure and slides, a wellness center, a steam room and other amenities.  • UC San Diego was named the No. 1 surf college in the U.S. by Surfer Magazine.  February • UC San Diego launched its bike-share program with Spin, a leading bike-share company that offered a fleet of orange-colored smart-bikes with GPS tracking. • Mayor Kevin L. Faulconer announced that San Diego Police Department Assistant Chief David Nisleit would be appointed as the City’s next police chief, replacing Chief Shelley Zimmerman, who retired in March after 35 years on the force. • The La Jolla Village News went out and sampled all the different kinds of pizzas in La Jolla in honor of National Pizza Day on Feb. 9.  • La Jolla Shores came in at No. 22 on TripAdvisor’s "Top 25 Beaches’ in the U.S." list.  • The annual Fourth of July fireworks display at La Jolla Cove was cancelled due to ongoing fundraising problems. "It’s really been part of our tradition,” said Deborah Marengo who spearheaded the event. "So, it’s just really sad to see that go.” • A petition to end the "Films of Woody Allen" course at UC San Diego, due to his allegations of rape, was nixed by the school’s academic senate. They voted to continue offering the course because removing it would "undermine both the value of free inquiry and the associated rights of faculty to engage in such inquiry by choosing their course content.” March • La Jolla Parks and Beaches, Inc. voted against allowing dockless scooters in the community, even though the item wasn’t on the meeting agenda. “How do we stop this invasion of our sidewalks?” asked Sally Miller of LJPB. • La Jolla High reflected on its own safety issues following the aftermath of the Parkland school mass shooting in Florida. Things like fixing broken blinds and hard-to-lock doors in classrooms were among some of the suggestions.  • The La Jolla Town Council hosted a meeting of the newly formed San Diego Coalition of Town Councils’ STVR Working Group where members discussed recommendations for tightening rules and enforcement governing the placement and operations of short-term vacation rentals.  • San Diego Judge Randa Trapp heard arguments for both sides as to whether or not assessed property under the La Jolla Maintenance Assessment District would receive any special benefit “over and above that” received by the general public.  • The University of California San Diego received $4.6 million in charitable gifts from more than a dozen descendants of Edward W. Scripps to fund the placement of the railing on the Ellen Browning Scripps Memorial Pier and the reconstruction and modernization of the Center for Coastal Studies.   April  • La Jolla Parks and Beaches, Inc. announced that the City waived the summer construction moratorium to hasten construction on the Children’s Pool Plaza beautification project, which includes walkway improvements, double-seat walls, shade trees, and gazebo repairs.  • James Niebling announced he would be resigning as president of the La Jolla Village Merchants Association. “I have truly enjoyed giving back to La Jolla by the Sea as a board director for the past seven years,” he said.  • Daniel Dorado, the owner of La Jolla Italian restaurant Voce Del Mare, pleaded not guilty Monday to 14 felony counts of sexually assaulting four women. • Renowned actor, author, and activist George Takei spoke on his experience in the Japanese-American internment camps from World War II and his life as a pop culture icon and entertainer at UC San Diego. • Residents voiced concerns for a loophole in the city’s development regulations that makes it so developers can acquire permits to tear down and rebuild a new home in as little as a day. "We’re concerned about developers, flippers, coming in, developing homes of large bulk and scale, out of character with the neighborhood, out of character with the community plan,” said Sharon Wampler. • Representatives from three dockless bike companies – Limebike, Ofo and Mobike – attempted to justify their business models before the La Jolla Village Merchants Association. Attendees argued that the bikes are being used illegally and without proper notification.  • White Sands Retirement Community completed its $20 million renovation, which started in 2016 and included updates of its main lobby and chapel, a new elevator, bistro and bar, and a newly reimagined library.   May  • A judge turned down a request to dismiss the embezzlement case against Cindy Greatrex who is accused of stealing $67,935 from the La Jolla Park & Recreation Inc. Board while she was its president. She pleaded not guilty. • La Jolla Village Merchants Association elected Alisha Hawrylyszyn Frank, a life coach with Fiercely Optimistic, as its new president.  • A red tide offshore San Diego brought a spectacular display of bioluminescence to beaches.  • Jewish Family Service of San Diego raised a record-setting $1.25 million at its annual Heart & Soul Gala at the Hyatt Regency La Jolla at Aventine. June • New ballot initiative “Yes! For a Better San Diego” proposed a 42-year increase in the city's visitor tax to fund the convention center expansion, homelessness programs, create new jobs, continue road repaving and other infrastructure improvements.  • The Center for World University Rankings named the University of California San Diego the globe’s 20th best university out of 2,000 universities worldwide.  • In partnership with Friends of Rose Canyon, University City Girl Scout Troop 4176 caught almost 200 crayfish Rose Canyon as part of their Girl Scout Bronze Award project.  • District 1 Councilmember Barbara Bry pushed for a styrofoam ban. "It’s a known carcinogen and pollutant,” she said of the chemicals found in styrofoam. • Holocaust survivor Rose Schindler received a high school diploma from La Jolla Country Day for her years of preaching a message of positivity and endurance in the presence of evil to schools throughout San Diego County. • District 1 Councilmember Barbara Bry supported the scooter boardwalk ban the City Council voted down. Bry agreed to form a City Council committee to explore the creation of a permit and fee system for dockless companies operating citywide.  • Mayor Kevin Faulconer released his much anticipated new regulations on short-term vacation rentals that included charging cost-recoverable fees to administer licenses and enforce code violations, establishing a “Good Neighbor” policy, hiring additional staff for complaints about nuisance properties and implementing a per-night fee that would generate an estimated $3 million annually.  July  • U.S. Rep. Scott Peters (CA-52) defended his co-sponsorship of the Keeping Families Together Act, which would have immediately halted separating families at the U.S.-Mexico border, as the right thing to do.  • A random survey found La Jollans overwhelmingly favored a visionary proposal by contractor Tom Grunow to restore the La Jolla Cultural Zone by “greening” it and making it more walkable. “This is a good idea that will invigorate La Jolla's Cultural District, improve the usability of the Rec Center, and help ease our parking shortage,” said landscape architect Jim Neri. • The La Jolla MAD decision was reversed. San Diego Judge Randa Trapp revisited her previous ruling on the MAD’s unconstitutionality, and the second time around, she determined the benefits association “had no standing in the case.” • La Jollans were mostly delighted by the City Council’s July 16 vote defeating Mayor Kevin Faulconer’s more lenient short-term rental proposal. A landmark counterproposal that favored stricter regulations allowing primary-residence-only rentals with a six-month maximum, was co-authored by Council members Barbara Bry of District 1 and Lorie Zapf of District 2. • Work began on three reservoirs connected with La Jolla Heights Natural Park near La Jolla Country Club, and residents spoke up about their concerns regarding truck traffic, noise, dirt and potential loss of native habitat and open space.  • San Diego was named the most scenic West Coast city in an Expedia poll. • La Jolla’s serial lobster poacher pleaded guilty to charges that he violated a court order by unlawfully removing 12 spiny lobsters from the South La Jolla State Marine Reserve. Xuan Lam Hoang was ordered to serve 45 days in custody and placed on three years of probation. August  • Mayor Kevin Faulconer and City Council president pro tem Barbara Bry reopened Doyle Community Park in University City following a period of much-needed equipment upgrades and park enhancements. • La Jolla was named one of "America’s 25 Best Beach Towns" by Fodor’s Travel.  • The water off La Jolla was 78.8 degrees, according to measurements taken by research scientists at Scripps Institution of Oceanography, a record-setting warm for San Diego. It was nine degrees above the typical temperature for that time of year. • Susan Botticelli was named the new board of advisors chair of the La Jolla YMCA.  • A new state-of-the-art Robotics Lab was delivered to the French American School in La Jolla.  • Consideration of Children’s Pool’s proposed historical designation was an action item on La Jolla Parks and Beaches, Inc.’s August agenda, which would "make the facility eligible for both public and private grant money to fix it up,” according to architectural historian Diane Kane.  September • The Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego’s director and CEO defended the institution against a claim by international architects and historians who’ve branded work, which will destroy the museum’s post-modern entryway, as “a tremendous mistake.” The addition — which will quadruple its current gallery space from 10,000 to about 40,000 square feet — was scheduled to begin in October.  • The San Diego Airport Authority launched a new mobile app that provided members of the public an easy-to-use, no-cost option for submitting an aircraft noise complaint.  • San Diego-based Climate Action Campaign held a forum on Community Choice Energy at the University of California San Diego. This model, which was approved by the state in 2002, could ultimately provide ratepayers with the option to choose where their power comes from.  • I Love A Clean San Diego mobilized 7,000 volunteers at 106 cleanup sites removed an estimated 130,000 pounds of trash and debris including a disco ball, 641 golf balls, a snowboard, and fake eyelashes. • Barbara Beltaire, owner of the Barbarella Restaurant & Bar in La Jolla, and known for her seasonal supernatural Halloween decorations, retired to devote her full attention to her new children’s charity, I Love You So So Much. "It is 100 percent individual gift donations to foster care, the elderly and canine companions,” said Beltaire.  October • La Jolla realtor Kara Kay announced she will be competing on the CBS-produced competitive reality TV series “Survivor: David vs. Goliath.” • San Diego Fire-Rescue Department Chief Colin Stowell announced James Gartland as the new lifeguard division chief. “We have some of the best public safety professionals in the country so it should come as no surprise that we hired one of our own to lead our lifeguard division,” said Mayor Kevin L. Faulconer.  • Peter Ogle, head coach of the La Jolla Country Day School’s girls volleyball team, retired after 41 years. His combination of caring and intensity led the team to 733 wins, 380 losses, three Coastal League championships, seven CIF championships, four Southern California Regional championships, and three state championships. • City Council voted 5-3 to ban the use and distribution of styrofoam citywide. • La Jolla Shores Association celebrated Scripps oceanographer Walter Munk’s 101st birthday. Munk is world renowned for showing why one side of the moon always faces the Earth, pioneering research on the relationship between winds and ocean circulation, and much more.  • Extra City pickup was added in La Jolla Shores to alleviate overflowing trash, but Janie Emerson, chair of the La Jolla Shores Association, said, "the city still has not moved two trash cans that have been causing the problem.” • Casa de Mañana resident Len Sandberg, 90, won the 148-pound-and-under Powerlifting Bench Press World Championship at Harrah’s Resort and Casino in Laughlin, Nev. November • A judge turned down a prosecution motion for the removal of Cindy Greatrex from any community boards as a condition of bond while she awaits an embezzlement trial for grand theft in the loss of $67,935 while she was president of the La Jolla Park & Recreation Inc. Board.  • City Council voted 8-1 to rescind a short-term vacation rental ordinance it passed in July. The re-vote was forced by a recently successful drive by a vacation rental coalition to put the measure on a future election ballot. • Two years after Ure Kretowicz conceded the public’s right to access the cobblestone beach below his property at 7957 Princess St., a group of neighbors surrounding Kretowicz’s property started campaigning against restoring public access there.  • The City of San Diego said previously reported problems with overflowing trash in La Jolla Shores have been properly addressed and resolved. “Trash containers some believed had not been moved, were in fact relocated in late September,” said City PIO Paul Brencick Sr., adding the City’s Environmental Services Department. • Criminal charges have been filed against the Carlton Gallery at 1144 Prospect St., its owner, and an employee for trafficking more than 300 pieces of ivory and items containing ivory.  • La Jolla’s Tiare Thompson won her first World Surf League’s Live Like Zander Junior Pro surf competition. December • A celebration was held for the improved Children’s Pool Plaza. La Jolla Parks and Beaches and Casa de Mañana co-hosted the event that honored the 8-year-old project. “This has been a precious space in La Jolla since 1931,” said Ann Dynes, chair of La Jolla Parks and Beaches, Inc. "It’s also become a precious space to a lot of our visitors. Now it has been revamped to accommodate all of the visitors.” • La Jolla Parks and Beaches, Inc. heard from landscape architect Jim Neri about plans to recreate a historic belvedere at Windansea off Neptune Place near Rosemont Street that was destroyed in the early ’80s.
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