Sdnews rss feed
    Rose Creek needs more friends and volunteers; advocates want waterway made into open-space park
    by DAVE SCHWAB
    Feb 17, 2019 | 6541 views | 3 3 comments | 6 6 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Rose Creek has become a dumping ground for trash, as well as a haven for homeless encampments. / Photo by Dave Schwab
    Rose Creek has become a dumping ground for trash, as well as a haven for homeless encampments. / Photo by Dave Schwab
    slideshow
    Rose Creek is a San Diego urban stream draining into Mission Bay, which flows north-south through Rose Canyon and San Clemente Canyon and their tributary canyons. / Photo by Dave Schwab
    Rose Creek is a San Diego urban stream draining into Mission Bay, which flows north-south through Rose Canyon and San Clemente Canyon and their tributary canyons. / Photo by Dave Schwab
    slideshow
    Rose Creek isn’t getting the attention it deserves. At least not according to local environmentalists, who insist restoring and maintaining the wetlands environment there is key to preserving the health of Mission Bay.  “Rose Creek is an amazing place to visit, there’s great birds, plants, and all we’re asking is for the city to take great responsibility for the area,” said Karin Zirk, spokesperson for Friends of Rose Creek, a nonprofit whose vision is for lower Rose Creek to be turned it into an open-space park providing recreational and educational opportunities. “Rose Creek is where land meets nature,” pointed out Paula Gandolfo, a PB planner and community activist and gardener. “As we, man, increase in numbers, we’re having a bigger impact on nature. And this is the watershed where it’s happening here in San Diego.” “Rose Creek is a tremendous asset to Mission Bay,” noted Kristen Victor, who is spearheading the drive to turn Pacific Beach into a full-blown EcoDistrict promoting environmental sustainability. “I believe that future opportunities (with Rose Creek) are just flowing.” Rose Creek is a San Diego urban stream draining into Mission Bay, which flows north-south through Rose Canyon and San Clemente Canyon and their tributary canyons. The Rose Creek watershed comprises about 36 square miles. Rose Creek, however, was diverted and channelized in the first half of the 20th century. It now enters Mission Bay through an artificial channel. The wetland where the creek historically entered Mission Bay is now known as the Kendall Frost Marsh, and is studied and managed by UC San Diego. The Rose Creek Watershed Alliance was created in 2005 to create a plan to improve the watershed. The plan was accepted by the City of San Diego in 2008.  Friends of Rose Creek conducts periodic cleanups in the waterway. The city has applied for a permit to clear vegetation from the lower creek channel, in an effort to prevent flooding. Friends of Rose Creek has a “game plan” for restoring the luster of Rose Creek that includes: - Maintaining and enhancing the existing linear natural park along Rose Creek between Rose Canyon and Marian Bear Open Space Parks in the north and Mission Bay Park in the south. - Connecting the entire Rose Creek Watershed into one City administrative unit in order to manage the area in the way nature functions. - Finding the best and safest ways to link Rose Creek waterway with the new trolley stop to be constructed at Balboa Avenue nearby, by improving freeway crossings in the area making them safer for bicyclists, pedestrians and wildlife. - Eventual creation of a wetlands interpretive and research center in partnership with UC San Diego. - Aiding county, state and federal funding sources that are paying for habitat restoration and passive recreational amenities, along with stormwater projects including water-quality improvements. On a recent tour of a section of Rose Creek in Pacific Beach, Zirk, Gandolfo and Victor walked the cluttered and clogged waterway, whose problems are self-evident. The waterway is a dumping ground for trash, as well as a haven for homeless encampments. “There’s trash, lots of it, including car batteries,” noted Gandolfo during the tour. “[Friends of Rose Creek] do two big cleanups a year with I love a Clean San Diego,” said Zirk. “During the past 15 years, our average haul has been four tons of trash a year. Some years, we might pull in six tons.” Zirk addressed a different problem with the creek. “The whole area is full of invasive plant species, which constrict the waterway and prevents the water from flowing,” she said. Gandolfo noted the waterway is increasingly popular for people. “With an increase in the volume (of people) comes an increase in the waste,” she said. “And an increase in waste includes biological waste, e coli bacteria (from human waste), which ends up in this waterway and eventually, out in the ocean.” “So far, the city has tried to say they’re not responsible for this trash in Rose Creek,” said Zirk, adding there are presently only two trash cans serviced solely by volunteers for people to dispose of their trash along the waterway’s PB section. “It needs to be more accessible,” said Victor of what has to be done to improve Rose Creek, especially given that the new trolley station will undoubtedly increase the volume of both motorized and non-motorized traffic in the area. “It’s been in the PB Community Plan since the early ’90s that Rose Creek should be parkland,” contends Zirk. “The city is saying the reason why it can’t be parkland is because it’s in the Stormwater and Transportation Department. But that department doesn’t engage with the community, whereas parks and rec would engage with the community.” In the final analysis, Zirk said the creek, and volunteers working to preserve it, need help. “Won’t you join us?” she asked.
    Comments
    (3)
    Comments-icon Post a Comment
    rshimizu20
    |
    2 Hours Ago
    They should make some people that are arrested in that area do community service and clean up that area.
    Buffalo Barnes
    |
    17 Hours Ago
    North of the Garnet Ave. bridge, pictured above, is a "no man's land" of trash, hobo jungles, trash, stolen bikes and scooters, etc. dumped in the creek. Not to mention crazed and smacked out people circling the drain of addiction. Just walking through the underpass can be a sketchy situation. I live about 50 yards down from the bridge and watch the ebb and flow of homeless and residents of the area and walk my dog along the Homeless Highway (bike path) picking up trash and all manner of discarded flotsam and jetsam of the wandering lost souls.
    beets 42
    |
    17 Hours Ago
    You may be able to get a grant to restore the creek from CDFW (Calif. Dept. of Fish and Wildlife) to restore it, especially if tied in with the marsh, and more so, if the stream could (especially if it did at one time) support steelhead. They have continuing grants.

    The stream might better support fish if there were a greater flow of water. That would also help move water through Mission Bay. It's been reported in the past that the eastern areas of the Bay don't have enough movement of water.

    Additional water might be obtained by releasing some of the recycled water from the Miramar plant. In the past, a lot of that has gone to waste. If it's pure enough to drink, it should be pure enough for the creek (that might take an act of Congress).
    Pacific Beach couple starting a movement with buckets, grabbers and Instagram
    by DAVE SCHWAB
    Feb 16, 2019 | 4168 views | 1 1 comments | 8 8 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Natalie Sollock (above) and Charley Kausen of Pacific Beach started picking up trash in the community.
    Natalie Sollock (above) and Charley Kausen of Pacific Beach started picking up trash in the community.
    slideshow
    Charley Kausen and Natalie Sollock of Pacific Beach are voluntarily picking up trash in the community and urging others to follow suit by providing an incentive to “Don’t Trash PB.” For a $15 Venmo mobile pay service “loan,” they’ll provide a branded bucket and hand-controlled extension trash “grabber” for others committing to doing their own community clean-up. “We send the person $5 back each time they send us a picture of their bucket full of garbage via email or post and tag us on Instagram,” Kausen and Sollock said in an email. “If they fill the bucket three times – the bucket, and grabber, are theirs forever. If at any time they don't want to participate, they can return the bucket and grabber and get any remaining deposit back in full.” They said the Venmo deposit is merely a way to ensure people actually use both clean-up tools provided, and not just let them sit in their garages. Discussing the origin of their clean-up project named “Don’t Trash PB,” Sollock said, “Charley was obsessive picking up trash every day on our walk to the beach, picking it up with his hands. Then we wised up and picked up a bucket and grabber.” Soon, the pair were out there showing and doing by personal example. It got attention, and results. “People started shouting at us out of their (car) windows, ‘Hey, what are you guys doing?’” said Kausen, adding others expressed interest in joining once told. “It finally dawned on us that all others needed to get involved was their own bucket and grabber,” said Sollock, adding that, by buying in bulk, they were able to bring the cost for the two pick-up tools down to about $10. “We then flocked to Instagram to help spread the word about it,” she added. The pair said a dozen or more people have taken them up on their bucket-and-grabber offer. And the word is spreading. “We don’t really have a mission statement,” said Sollock. “The whole idea was just to get people actively cleaning up in their own neighborhoods. We just wanted to provide the tools for them to do that.” To get a bucket and grabber, people can reach out to Kausen and Sollock on Instagram @donttrashpb, or email donttrashpb@gmail.com.
    Comments
    (1)
    Comments-icon Post a Comment
    Buffalo Barnes
    |
    February 17, 2019
    I do the same thing along Rose Creek (aka-The Homeless Highway) and other areas. Banning plastic straws? Ban 'to go' cups and tops too. So MANY of them just dropped along the streets along with empty and likely stolen Amazon boxes and envelopes.
    Mayor proposes new regulations for scooters and bikes
    Feb 15, 2019 | 16535 views | 0 0 comments | 4 4 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Electric scooters near the boardwalk in Mission Beach. Using geofencing technology, operators will be required to slow their devices down to eight miles per hour on the boardwalks in Mission Beach, Pacific Beach and La Jolla beach areas. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    Electric scooters near the boardwalk in Mission Beach. Using geofencing technology, operators will be required to slow their devices down to eight miles per hour on the boardwalks in Mission Beach, Pacific Beach and La Jolla beach areas. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    slideshow
    On Feb. 14, Mayor Kevin L. Faulconer released a set of proposed regulations for dockless scooters and bicycles to address public safety concerns by slowing the devices down in heavily-trafficked public spaces, establish clear rules of the road to hold operators accountable, and charge an annual fee for each device. The proposed ordinance will be discussed at the City Council’s Feb. 20 Active Transportation and Infrastructure Committee meeting. Faulconer’s proposed regulations cover six primary areas – limiting maximum speed of motorized scooters in designated zones, vehicle staging and parking, rider education, data sharing, fees and legal indemnification for the City of San Diego. The mayor’s proposed regulations include: Permit and fees: Each company wishing to operate within City limits will be issued a six-month permit and will be required to pay $150 per device annually. Operators will only be allowed to amend or renew their permit, including increasing the size of their fleet, during the permit issuance months of January and June. Companies offering an approved equity program can receive a $15 per device reduction in their annual fee. Operators will also be required to pay a “performance bond,” which can be returned in the event they cease operation in San Diego and remove their devices.  Limiting speed: Using geofencing technology, operators will be required to slow their devices down to eight miles per hour in designated high-pedestrian traffic zones around the City, including: - Boardwalks in Mission Beach, Pacific Beach and La Jolla beach areas; - Spanish Landing; - Petco Park; - Balboa Park; - NTC Park; - Mission Bay Park. In two other areas in downtown San Diego, scooters will be required to slow to three miles per hour, with riders being notified they are in a no-ride zone. Those areas are:  - North and South Embarcadero; - Martin Luther King Jr. Promenade. Staging and parking: Operators may stage their devices in groups of up to four, and there must be 40 feet between groups of staged devices. They will also be prohibited from staging in school zones and hospital zones. Additionally, users will be prohibited from ending their rides in some areas, including the beach area boardwalks, the perimeter of Petco Park and the north and south Embarcadero walks in downtown. The City will encourage residents to report misplaced or abandoned bikes and scooters through the “Get It Done” application. Operators will be notified of the reports and will have three hours to remove the devices or face potential impound and associated fees.   City indemnification: Each operator will be required to indemnify the City from liability claims and each will need to hold a liability insurance policy. Rider education: Prior to each use, companies will be required to educate riders of local and state vehicle and traffic codes and the cost of a citation for violating those laws. Each device also will need to be clearly labeled “Riding on Sidewalks is Prohibited” and include operator age requirements. “The City of San Diego is taking a smart approach to dockless mobility,” said Colin Parent, executive director of Circulate San Diego. “San Diego is ensuring access to new transportation choices, while balancing the needs of other users of the public right-of-way.”  Data sharing: The operators will provide the City with detailed monthly reports that will be useful for Climate Action Plan monitoring and mobility planning, including but not limited to: - Deployed Device Data, including fleet size and utilization rates; - Trip information, including start/end points, routes, distances and duration; - Parking information; - Reported incidents and actions taken; - Reported obstructions/hazards and actions taken; - Maintenance activities. “We welcome more mobility options and these new regulations take a common-sense approach that will allow this emerging market to grow in a responsible way,” Faulconer said. “Scooters and e-bikes are providing an opportunity for thousands of people to get around town without a car, creating less traffic and cutting greenhouse gas emissions.” “I am pleased to see the City adopt sensible regulations for dockless scooters and bicycles that prioritizes public safety and embraces the sharing economy,” said City Councilmember Chris Cate. “Resolving this issue has been one of my top priorities, and I am appreciative that my solutions will be implemented.”
    Comments
    (0)
    Comments-icon Post a Comment
    No Comments Yet
    Do you know what to do if you find a stray kitten?
    by EMILY BLACKWOOD
    Feb 13, 2019 | 15022 views | 0 0 comments | 5 5 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Photo courtesy of the San Diego Humane Society
    Photo courtesy of the San Diego Humane Society
    slideshow

    Of course, your first instinct is to snuggle them, but that might not be the best idea. With kitten season approaching this spring, the San Diego Human Society wants local residents to be aware of the exact steps to take when you find a stray kitten.

    According to the organization’s Kitten Nursery manager Jakie Noble, nearly 3,000 0- to 8-week-old kittens were turned into the humane society last year. And there are typically two “waves” of kittens; one when the weather starts to warm up in spring and another in the fall.

    With so many kittens being born, there’s a greater chance for people to find them. So while leaving a kitten alone is probably one of the hardest things to do, it is the first step.

    “The most common mistake people make when they find kittens is they panic and remove the kittens from their environment right away,” Noble said, adding that it’s important to first assess the situation. Ask yourself if the kitten is in danger of predators, if it’s injured or if it appears to be cold or hungry.

    “If the kitten(s) are warm and quietly snuggled together, the likelihood is that the mother cat may be close by, waiting for the human to leave her nesting spot,” Noble said. “If you find a kitten alone, this could mean the mother cat is moving her litter to another nesting spot. Mom uses her mouth to pick up and move the kittens, so she can only move one kitten at a time. Be careful not to ‘steal’ a kitten she may be returning to move."

    As much as most people would love to, not everyone has enough time to sit and wait to see if the mother cat comes back. That’s when you can use what Noble calls the “flour trick.”

    “Take a small amount of flour and make a ring around the nest area. Watch from a safe distance to see if mom returns. Come back in a few hours. If you see paw prints in the flour, this is a sure sign that the mother cat is around and tending to her kittens.”

    If the mother cat does not return for her kitten(s), then it’s time to take action. If you have the availability and knowledge to take on the kittens, do so, but if you don’t, bring them to your local shelter so they can be properly evaluated and taken care of. But don’t forget about the mother cat.

    “Every effort should be made to catch/trap the mother cat too,” Noble said. “If an un-spayed cat no longer has kittens, she can immediately go back into heat and have another litter of kittens in just 60 days. The only way to break the cycle of kittens being born is to take responsibility for spaying and neutering outdoor community cats.”

    And if you do decide to take the kitten(s) in — even temporarily — Noble warns that they shouldn't be fed right away. In fact, the priority should be to get the kitten(s) warm before they eat because a cold kitten can’t successfully digest foot.

    When the kitten is warmed up, be sure you feed it the right diet, which is not cow’s milk, human food or cereal. Instead, go to your local pet supply store and buy kitten milk replacer. If you don’t have access to that, it’s important to seek assistance from our local rescue group, vet clinic or animal shelter.

    For more information about kitten care and kitten adoptions, visit sdhumane.org.

    Comments
    (0)
    Comments-icon Post a Comment
    No Comments Yet
    Grigolite making a splash with Bucs’ water polo
    by DAVE THOMAS
    Feb 08, 2019 | 7743 views | 0 0 comments | 13 13 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Mission Bay junior Jesse Grigolite takes a shot. / Courtesy photo
    Mission Bay junior Jesse Grigolite takes a shot. / Courtesy photo
    slideshow
    Given the skills and conditioning it takes to play water polo, not everyone is cut out for it. But one local girl churning up success in the pool is Mission Bay High junior Jesse Grigolite. Seeing time as an attacker and sprinter, Grigolite has been quite a find for water polo coach Lyndsay Sutterley. “Jesse is an invaluable athlete to her team,” Sutterley said. “Her teammates can rely on her offensively and defensively. Teammates know they can count on her, in and out of the pool. Everyone on the team not only adores her, but respects her. She knows how to bring the team up and motivate those around her.” Grigolite carries a 4.5 grade point average. She is also the vice president of the Climate Kids club and a member of the school’s Eco club. Beach & Bay Press recently caught up with Grigolite for an email Q&A. BBP: How did you get interested in water polo? Grigolite: I originally went into my winter season of freshman year with the intention of playing soccer for Mission Bay. Once in the pool, I knew this wasn’t an opportunity that I could turn a blind eye to. However, the game, coaching staff, and my teammates were the determining factors that made me stick with this sport and come to love it so much. Mission Bay provides a welcoming environment to all beginners and pushes each player to become better. B&BP: What do you see as your biggest contributions? Grigolite: Personally, I see the whole team as one unit so it is hard to pick out individual contributions. However, if I had to pinpoint my personal strengths, I think they would consist of drawing positioning ejections, endurance in the water, providing consistent effort in all I do and being able to ask questions. In addition, I try to offer some guidance in the water as far as driving and defense for the less experienced players, but our coaches Lyndsay and John as well as our captains help a great deal with that also. B&BP: Outside of water polo, what do you enjoy? Grigolite: For the summer, I work as an intern for San Diego Junior Lifeguard Program and I have the intention to be an ocean lifeguard next year. I am also on the Mission Bay surf team. In addition, I am apart of Eco Club, which has done great work reducing Pacific Beach’s single-use-plastics and volunteers in various ways throughout our community. I also help to run Mission Bay’s Climate Kids club as the vice president; our mission is to educate children as well as the community about the crisis of climate change. B&BP: Any advice for any girls thinking about coming out for the team? Grigolite: If any young girls have interest in trying out for the program I would highly encourage them to. It is not only great exercise and a fun game, but it provides an opportunity to build friendships and meet new people on campus. It is the opportunity to become a part of something bigger than you. B&BP: Do you see yourself doing water polo in college? Grigolite: I would be ecstatic to go to the academic school of my choice and play club. This would be a great balance for me and allow me the opportunity to keep getting to do something that makes me very happy. Editor’s note: If you know of a MBH winter sports athlete who would make a good feature story, please email: hoopsthomas@yahoo.com
    Comments
    (0)
    Comments-icon Post a Comment
    No Comments Yet
    News
    Former Secretary of State Madeleine Albright to serve as UC San Diego commencement speaker
    T he University of California San Diego announced today that author, businesswoman, professor and former Secretary of State Madeleine K. Albright will deliver the keynote address at the UC San Dieg...
    Published - Thursday, February 14
    full story
    News and community briefs for Ocean Beach and Point Loma
    CRAFT BEER, GIRL SCOUT COOKIES ON MENU FOR COOKIES ON TAP For the fifth consecutive year, adult fans of Girl Scout Cookies will pair them with local craft beers during National Girl Scout Cookie We...
    Published - Wednesday, February 13
    full story
    Obituary: Gustaf Arrhenius, oceanographer at Scripps Institution of Oceanography
    Gustaf Arrhenius, an oceanographer at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California San Diego whose varied research considered the earliest life on Earth and origins of the so...
    Published - Wednesday, February 13
    full story
    Seany Foundation hosts wellness retreat to raise money for children facing cancer
    Like so many kids, Kristen Gascon and Tiana Lacerva met when they were 8 years old during summer camp, but unlike many kids, they were both battling cancer. “Honestly, it was one of the best things...
    Published - Wednesday, February 13
    full story
    City rescinds ban on vehicle-habitation; local leaders ask ‘Now what?’
    Peninsulans reacted to the City Council’ s recent unanimous vote to repeal a 1983 ordinance prohibiting residents from living in a vehicle on streets within city limits. “While I don’t believe anyo...
    Published - Wednesday, February 13
    full story
    PLNU’s annual Writer’s Symposium spotlights restorative narratives
    Every spring for the last 24 years, Point Loma Nazarene University has hosted reporters like George Plimpton, authors like Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, poets like Nikki Giovani and screenwriters such as De...
    Published - Wednesday, February 13
    full story
    UC San Diego student, arrested for allegedly stealing women’s panties, fails to show for arraignment
    A UC San Diego student, who was arrested on suspicion of stealing $223 worth of women's underwear at a dorm laundry room, failed to show up for arraignment and the City Attorney's office said on Mo...
    Published - Tuesday, February 12
    full story
    Eat, drink and love on Valentine’s Day in Ocean Beach and Point Loma
    Sure, everyone enjoys a romantic excursion to some faraway land every now and then, but there’s a special kind of magic in the air when you take your date on a stroll through the neighborhood or to...
    Published - Tuesday, February 12
    full story
    CIF playoff pairings announced for Point Loma teams
    Following conclusion of the regular winter season, the San Diego CIF section announced playoff pairings for four Point Loma team sports, while girls water polo playoffs came to an end. In boys socc...
    Published - Tuesday, February 12
    full story
    Point Loma Association plans a canopy of lights for Rosecrans
    There is a new project by the Point Loma Association to brighten the community: anchor lights. Plans are in the works by the PLA, which is committed to improving Point Loma’s quality of life throug...
    Published - Tuesday, February 12
    full story
    Complaints of drug dealing prompt police patrols at Robb Field
    Residents complaining of flagrant illegal drug dealing and use at Robb Field in Ocean Beach, recently prompted increased foot patrols in the popular recreational area, which police claim has gotten...
    Published - Tuesday, February 12
    full story
    This OB pig wants to surf and become an emotional support animal
    Betito is one motivated pig. This summer, he wants to learn how to surf (and simultaneously get over his slight fear of water), finish taking his remaining classes to become a certified emotional s...
    Published - Monday, February 11
    full story
    Ravive Health & Vitality expands services in Point Loma
    You can revive at Ravive, a holistic wellness center that just expanded in Point Loma Village. Noting his business name is “a play on words, branding you’ll remember,” Howard Flamm, clinic director...
    Published - Monday, February 11
    full story
    New Congenital Heart Disease Program at UC San Diego Health treats patients with complex needs
    Cristi Walker was born with congenital heart disease. In essence, half of a functional heart. Her condition required multiple surgeries throughout childhood. “It was tough growing up. I had to real...
    Published - Monday, February 11
    full story
    Current Issues(Archives)
    The Peninsula Beacon, February 14th, 2019
    download The Peninsula Beacon, February 14th, 2019
    The Peninsula Beacon, February 14th, 2019
    La Jolla Village News, February 8th, 2019
    download La Jolla Village News, February 8th, 2019
    La Jolla Village News, February 8th, 2019
    Beach & Bay Press, February 8th, 2019
    download Beach & Bay Press, February 8th, 2019
    Beach & Bay Press, February 8th, 2019
    The Peninsula Beacon, January 31st, 2019
    download The Peninsula Beacon, January 31st, 2019
    The Peninsula Beacon, January 31st, 2019