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    Pacific Beach residents fed up with ongoing pipeline project
    by DAVE SCHWAB
    Feb 19, 2018 | 2614 views | 0 0 comments | 6 6 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Northbound on the Ingraham Street bridge has been reduced to one land for months. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    Northbound on the Ingraham Street bridge has been reduced to one land for months. / Photo by Thomas Melville
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    Construction crews replace pipeline on Grand Avenue in Pacific Beach. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    Construction crews replace pipeline on Grand Avenue in Pacific Beach. / Photo by Thomas Melville
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    Some Pacific Beach residents are becoming increasingly perturbed by alleged collateral damage from an infrastructure project that has the beach community torn up from seemingly endless construction. At issue is the ongoing Pacific Beach Pipeline South and West Projects, which are replacing nearly 39,000 linear feet of water main, and nearly 6,800 feet of sewer main, with new, 16-inch PVC mains. The project, which began July 2016 and is scheduled to conclude October 2019, at a total projected cost of slightly more than $34 million, is estimated to take 55 months to complete.  TC Construction Co. is executing the construction project on Ingraham Street, which cuts across the Pacific Beach, Midway-Pacific Highway and Mission Bay Park areas. Next Door social media in Pacific Beach has been lit up lately with complaints/questions about pipeline construction and its alleged negative impacts to the community. “The pipe dig/installation schedule is ridiculous, but my real question is why the street resurfacing after the pipe installation takes so long?” asked Rick Burroughs of PB North. “It seems pretty obvious this project is lacking oversight. Ingraham through Crown Point has been torn up for years … It’s dangerous and embarrassing.” “I realized they have to change the pipes,” said Erik Eisenhardt. “But it would be nice if, when [the contractor] finished in one area, they would pave the streets and move to the next. It’s just a nightmare. All the streets are torn up.”  “The patchwork is terrible,” said Dan Bernard. “Ingraham felt like the Belmont roller coaster.” Russell Watson of PB North Shore Highlands concurred. “The worst road work I’ve ever seen,” Watson said. “The repair work is horrible. They should be doing the whole street instead of patchwork.” City spokesman Alec Phillipp discussed the pipeline project’s budget and timeline. “We are currently on schedule to have the project completed in late 2019, but this schedule is subject to change,” Phillipp said. “The project is still on budget, with the full construction contract amount being $34.2 million.” Phillips said the contractor is “currently installing pipe on Ingraham Street between the two bridges near Vacation Island, and continuing work on the north bridge.” Phillip added, “Looking forward, the contractor will continue pipe installation in West Mission Bay Drive, and install the last segment of pipe in West Point Loma Boulevard.” Not all public reaction to pipeline construction has been negative.  Crown Point Drive resident Anabelle described construction workers as “courteous, polite and very caring. They have been working in front of my house for over a month and display professionalism … accommodate our three kids constantly … offered my in-laws ear plugs … They work hard and really know what they are doing.” “All these cast-iron pipes need to be replaced in the street and on our properties and the whole city is facing the same problem,” said David Clausson in east PB. “Just so happens that time is now.” Marilyn Link in southwest PB has also been impressed by pipeline work being done on east/west side streets.  “They get in there, and get it done,” Link said. “The detours are minor … their notifications to residents have given ample warning, and the engineering and planning for such a massive project is mind boggling.” But there have been problems other than excessive dust, noise and traffic dislocation caused by ongoing pipeline replacement. D. Pierce, a seasonal resident in the 1400 block of Thomas Avenue, said, “We have yet to see a street sweeper in the past three months … The traffic barricades are in my driveway … I called the city street sweeping department and they admit that they cannot do the job when there are temporary water lines.  Obviously, the parking enforcement people didn’t get the memo.” Added Pierce, “It would be interesting to see how much money the city has collected in parking tickets based on the fact that there was no need to enforce the laws, as the streets were never swept due to the construction.” The city parking enforcement division could not be reached by Beach & Bay Press for comment by press time. PB resident Matt Phillips of Crown Point North has also taken action, and is actively collecting signatures on the 1500 block of Oliver Avenue and Haines Street demanding the removal of equipment to reclaim lost parking spaces from pipeline work. Speaking for many on pipeline construction, Sean Brew noted: “I live in Crown Point and there is a ton of major construction projects that seem endless — streets dug up, Ingraham Street bridge, a big barge in Mission Bay. It would be great to have more info on what they are doing, and when they plan to finish.”
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    Beachgoers flock to the new trend: Bird scooters
    by DAVE SCHWAB
    Feb 16, 2018 | 10490 views | 1 1 comments | 7 7 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    A Bird scooter is ridden down the boardwalk in Pacific Beach. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    A Bird scooter is ridden down the boardwalk in Pacific Beach. / Photo by Thomas Melville
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    Stephanie Michaels (left), visiting from Chicago, and Pacific Beach resident Kelley Hopkins download the Bird app so they can take a ride. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    Stephanie Michaels (left), visiting from Chicago, and Pacific Beach resident Kelley Hopkins download the Bird app so they can take a ride. / Photo by Thomas Melville
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    Bird scooters are the new thing to ride in Pacific Beach. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    Bird scooters are the new thing to ride in Pacific Beach. / Photo by Thomas Melville
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    Heard of car share and bike share? Now there’s scooter share in Pacific Beach. Black-hued “Bird” Segway Kickscooter ES1 Electric Scooters, retailing for $399, are seemingly everywhere these days along the beachfront. The 30- to 40-pound dockless electric scooters, capable of speeds up to 15 mph, are available through a scooter-share service via a smartphone app. The scooter-share startup, Bird, was begun by Travis VanderZanden, who was previously an executive with Uber and Lyft ride sharing. Launched in September 2017, tens of thousands of people have already ridden Birds from the company that started in Los Angeles, and has since spread to Venice and south to San Diego. Bird plans to branch out to dozens of other markets this year. In Pacific Beach and elsewhere along the San Diego coast, the new transportation mode played to mostly mixed reviews. But Sara Berns, executive director of Discover PB, the community’s business improvement district, views Birds differently. “Bird scooters could be a unique opportunity to offer an alternative transportation model, and last-mile commutes that align with our eco-district principles, while mitigating some of Pacific Beach’s parking and traffic issues,” said Sara Berns, executive director of Discover PB, the community’s business improvement district. “However, we want to ensure that the company and its ridership are adhering to public safety concerns, and that of our merchants. We have reached out to work with the company to help alleviate some of those issues to ensure they are not impeding on our existing business community, but rather enhancing it,” she said. “We look forward to them working with us and the community at- large.” Dan Michaels of Pacific Beach turned his thumbs down on the new alternative ride share service. “These new electric scooters for rent all over PB is getting annoying,” said Michaels on the Next Door social media site. “They are leaving them everywhere and [they’re] allowed to operate without a business license. Riders are intoxicated renting them, under age, and don't obey any laws of the road. Then when finished, they are leaving them in front of doors, ramps, etc.” Business owner Michaels pointed out PB has “fought hard to remove bike share stations (Deco renamed DiscoverBike) from the boardwalk. This company thinks they can just establish these in the same places. What can we do next to stop this before someone gets hurt,” asked Michaels. There are numerous rules in the California Vehicle Codes applying to the safe and proper use of electric scooters like Bird. Police warn they will issue citations for a range of violations, costing between $197 and $367, for non-lawful operation of such scooters. Citable scooter offenses include: a prohibition against driving while intoxicated, not having headlights and reflectors at night, not riding on the right-hand edge of roadways, exiting bike lanes without signaling, not having brakes, riders not wearing mandatory bicycle helmets, and not allowing passengers, among other restrictions. When finished, Bird users lock them in place at their end destination. Scooters employ GPS and an electric lock restricting wheel movement. If tampered with, an alarm is triggered on the vehicle locking its wheels in place and making them unridable. For more information about vehicle codes applying to Bird scooters visit, http://codes.findlaw.com/ca/vehicle-code/veh-sect-21221.html.
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    Celebrating Black History Month: Former San Diego Gulls winger Willie O'Ree broke NHL color barrier with Boston
    by SCOTT HOPKINS
    Feb 14, 2018 | 6473 views | 2 2 comments | 9 9 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Willie O'Ree prepares to drop a ceremonial puck before a recent San Diego Gulls game. O'Ree, a former Gulls player, was the first black player in the NHL 60 years ago. At left is current Gull Jaycob Megna and at right John McCarthy of the San Jose Barracuda. SAN DIEGO GULLS / COURTESY
    Willie O'Ree prepares to drop a ceremonial puck before a recent San Diego Gulls game. O'Ree, a former Gulls player, was the first black player in the NHL 60 years ago. At left is current Gull Jaycob Megna and at right John McCarthy of the San Jose Barracuda. SAN DIEGO GULLS / COURTESY
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    Former member of the San Diego Gulls Willie O'Ree, left, is presented a jersey by the current Gulls team during a night honoring the legendary O'Ree. The native of Fredericton, New Brunswick was the first black player in the National Hockey League when he joined the Boston Bruins in 1958. SAN DIEGO GULLS / COURTESY
    Former member of the San Diego Gulls Willie O'Ree, left, is presented a jersey by the current Gulls team during a night honoring the legendary O'Ree. The native of Fredericton, New Brunswick was the first black player in the National Hockey League when he joined the Boston Bruins in 1958. SAN DIEGO GULLS / COURTESY
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    On Jan. 18, 1958, a young hockey player was called up from the minor leagues to join the Boston Bruins of the National Hockey League, who were in Montreal for a game at the Forum, home of the Canadiens. His name was Willie O'Ree, and history was made that night. Why? O'Ree is black. And, while he only played in two games that season, the color barrier in professional hockey had been broken, giving O'Ree the honorable designation as the "Jackie Robinson of hockey." Born Oct. 15, 1935, in the coal-mining town of Fredericton, New Brunswick, O'Ree was the youngest of 13 children. Driven to succeed in both athletics and academics, he soon began to believe he could compete in sports at a pro level. As a youngster in 1949, he also received an invitation from the Atlanta Braves to their minor league baseball camp. When he deplaned in Atlanta, he recalls seeing the drinking fountains marked "White Only" and "Colored Only." While in the United States, however, O'Ree had the opportunity to meet black baseball star Jackie Robinson in Brooklyn. “I knew he broke the color barrier,” O’Ree recalls, “and when I actually met him he said, ‘There’s no black kids that play hockey.’ And I said, ‘Yeah, there’s a few.'” Robinson told him “Whatever sport you choose, work hard and do your very best. Things will work out for you.” O'Ree returned in 1961 to play 43 games for the Bruins, scoring four goals and adding 10 assists. And while those were the only games he played in the NHL, the door had opened for black players to compete at the highest level. O'Ree's greatest strengths were the speed with which he could skate and his checking ability on defense. While he was not imposing in stature at 5 feet 10 inches tall and 170 pounds, his toughness, determination and speed allowed him to make a considerable impact driving opposing players into the boards. His Boston teammates stuck up for him, but in one game Eric Nesterenko of the Chicago Black Hawks hit him in the face with the butt end of his stick, knocking out two of O'Ree's teeth and breaking his nose. O'Ree responded by hitting Nesterenko over the head with his stick, igniting a fight between the teams... with Nesterenko acquiring 15 new stitches in his head. "I was prepared for it [verbal and physical abuse] because I knew it would happen. I wasn’t a great slugger, but I did my share of fighting. I was determined that I wasn’t going to be run out of the rink,” O'Ree recalled. In 1967, general manager Max McNabb of the nascent San Diego Gulls of the Western Hockey League acquired O'Ree from the rival Los Angels Blades, and O'Ree immediately became a fan favorite as he accelerated to full skating speed in four or five strides and rushed the opponents' net. Record-size minor league crowds at the then San Diego Sports Arena roared as O'Ree won the WHL goal-scoring title with 38 in 1968-69. With his 41 assists, he totaled 79 points in 70 games. After his retirement in 1979, O'Ree settled in San Diego and today lives in La Mesa. O'Ree kept a secret during his playing career that spanned 28 years: One afternoon in the mid 1950s, a puck ricocheted off a stick and struck O'Ree in the right eye, shattering his retina. He lost 97 percent of the vision in the eye, which had to be removed years later. Doctors urged him to hang up his skates. Eight weeks later he was back on the ice where he switched from left wing to right wing so he could see the puck better, yet fearing his career would end if his handicap were discovered. Eventually, the NHL took note of O'Ree's historic status and in 1998 invited him to be the director of youth development for its Diversity Task Force, a nonprofit program for minority youth that provides equipment and ice time so inner-city kids might learn and play hockey in its "Hockey is for Everyone" program. On Jan. 19, 2008, the Boston Bruins and NHL honored O'Ree at TD Garden marking the 50th anniversary of his debut. Those in attendance included a busload of O'Ree's friends from his native Fredericton. The next month, ESPN aired a special program on O'Ree in honor of Black History Month. Last month marked the 60th anniversary of O'Ree's first game, and O'Ree once again returned to Boston to be honored. "It’s wonderful and I was thrilled," O'Ree recalled. "When I was in Boston [last month] it took me back to when I first came to the Bruins and the training camp in 1957. I kind of fell in love with the team and the entire Bruins organization." NHL Commissioner Gary Bettman noted O'Ree has impacted more than 40,000 children in his 20-year NHL ambassador career. "Willie has a resolve and an inner strength that allows him to do what he believes and not let anything get in his way," Bettman said. O'Ree has received many other awards including the Order of Canada, the highest civilian award for a Canadian citizen. The love affair between San Diego hockey fans and Willie O'Ree has continued to grow over the decades. When not on the road as part of his NHL commitment, O'Ree, now 82 years old, can be found enjoying a San Diego Gulls game at the Valley View Casino Center. Always upbeat, he never denies an autograph request. While his number 20 jersey has hung from the arena rafters for several years, the Gulls recently honored O'Ree at a Diversity Night-themed game. He conducted the ceremonial puck drop to a standing ovation from over 8,500 fans. O'Ree has overcome much in his life and, through hard work and determination, earned his status as a local legend and hero. QUOTABLE:  FROM HOCKEY LEGEND WILLIE O'REE “Racist remarks from fans were much worse in the U.S. cities than in Toronto and Montreal. I particularly remember a few incidents in Chicago. The fans would yell, ‘Go back to the South’ and ‘How come you’re not picking cotton?’ Things like that. It didn’t bother me. Hell, I’d been called names most of my life. I just wanted to be a hockey player, and if they couldn’t accept that fact, that was their problem, not mine. “In the penalty box, stuff would be thrown at me and they’d spit at me. I never fought one time because of racial remarks. But I said, ‘If I’m going to leave the league, it’s because I don’t have the skills or the ability to play anymore. I’m not going to leave it ’cause some guy makes a threat or tries to get me off my game by making racial remarks towards me." "We have approximately 32 cities in the Hockey is For Everyone program, and the first thing I say is to these boys and girls is to stay in school and get an education. Education is the key. You can’t go anywhere today in the world without an education."  "You need to set goals for yourselves, and you need to work towards your goals and believe and feel good about yourself and like yourself." "If you think you can then you can, and if you think you can’t, you’re right."     
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    Doug 1974
    |
    February 14, 2018
    I remember watching O'Ree when he played with the old L.A. Blades of the WHL and the writer is correct, O'Ree was an amazingly fast skater. It's too bad he was born a generation too early as he would have been a big NHL star once the league expanded.
    Scott Hopkins
    |
    February 15, 2018
    Good point, Doug. The players in the old Western Hockey League probably would be NHLers today with 31 teams. Back in the day, the NHL consisted of only six teams, leaving very few roster spots for players like Willie. But then we may never have had the privilege of seeing him play in San Diego!
    Pacific Beach entrepreneur has it made in the shades
    by SAVANAH DUFFY
    Feb 14, 2018 | 4109 views | 0 0 comments | 7 7 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    A model shows off sunglasses from Blenders Eyewear.
    A model shows off sunglasses from Blenders Eyewear.
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    Hanging out on the beach with Natty Ice Lime sunglasses.
    Hanging out on the beach with Natty Ice Lime sunglasses.
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    Modeling the Sunshine Wild and Fifth Ave Flash sunglasses from Blenders Eyewear.
    Modeling the Sunshine Wild and Fifth Ave Flash sunglasses from Blenders Eyewear.
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    If you live in San Diego, you probably recognize a few required living essentials: sunscreen, swimsuits, sandals and, according to San Diego State University graduate and entrepreneur Chase Fisher, you must have “a good pair of shades.” But sunglasses that are both affordable and of good quality can be hard to come by – a challenge met with enthusiasm by Fisher’s Pacific Beach-based business. Since 2012, his sunglasses company Blenders Eyewear has been selling “fresh, vibrant, comfortable” shades and goggles in store and online. According to Fisher, it’s the active lifestyle of San Diego that inspires the product. Their motto, “Founded on Fun. Designed for Adventure. Priced to Party,” says it all. Blender Eyewear’s sunglasses are priced between about $20 and $65 and are made to be light-weight with maximum comfortability. The polycarbonate lenses, all of which are UV-protected, can bend without breaking so they’re convenient to wear for any occasion. “We try to get the best stuff at the best price we can, and bring the best value,” Fisher said. Fisher says he was inspired to open the business by the gear he saw others wearing when he surfed competitively in his home town of Santa Barbara. The active San Diego lifestyle also inspired the products But the true “ah-ha” moment, as Fisher puts it, was when he was in a night club sporting $5 neon green sunglasses. According to him, his cheap glasses attracted as much attention as they would have if they’d been expensive name brand glasses, sparking his business idea for quality shades that wouldn’t require customers to “spend their entire bank account.” Blenders offers a diverse line of styles to fit everyone’s taste, from the bold tropical patterned Kate Forest sunglasses with blue and green lenses to the more subtle Surfliner sunglasses with the light blue rims and black lenses. Often times, the most popular sunglasses will sell out quickly, but being out of stock doesn’t tend to pose a problem, says customer success manager Lexi Horn. A different pair rises up immediately to become the new favorite. “I’m really confident in our brand,” she says. On each pair of sunglasses is the company’s logo: a pair of stripes “//,” which symbolizes “life in forward motion.” “It’s following your passion, whatever that might be,” said Fisher about the logo’s meaning. “We try to design our glasses around any possible lifestyle.” The company promotes fun and adventure, but sunglasses sales aren’t without their challenges. According to Fisher, it’s a competitive market with continuously shifting trends that are difficult to keep up with. With production timelines taking between 90 and 120 days, he says the changes in popular styles aren’t something that can be easily planned for. Horn adds that the company commonly has to “fix things on the fly,” but that the customers have remained loyal through the adjustments. For the Blenders Eyewear team, the rewards of the business outshine the challenges. “For me, the most filling thing is just adding value to people’s lives,” says Fisher. “I think our product really allows people to express themselves.” The future of Blenders Eyewear will include a new kids line, limited edition projects, and an expansion of both the snow goggles and sunglasses line, according to Fisher. The Blenders Eyewear office is located in Pacific Beach at 1940 Garnet Ave. It is open from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. during weekdays and closed on weekends. Blenders Eyewear Where: 1940 Garnet Ave. No. 240. Hours: 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. weekdays, closed weekends. Info: blenderseyewear.com.
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    Ocean Beach woman’s vision and hard work creates successful Annie Margot Designs
    by LUCIA VITI
    Feb 13, 2018 | 3952 views | 1 1 comments | 10 10 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Ocean Beach resident Annie Margot St. Lifer with her eclectic collection of African Mud Cloth-embellished, Levi-denim jackets.
    Ocean Beach resident Annie Margot St. Lifer with her eclectic collection of African Mud Cloth-embellished, Levi-denim jackets.
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    Chic. Funky. Cool. One-of-a-kind designer jackets, presented by Annie Margot Designs, are splashing their way through San Diego. Spearheaded by fashion designer Annie Margot St. Lifer, this eclectic collection of African Mud Cloth-embellished, Levi-denim jackets are replete with color, swank and fashion pizzazz. An array of “100 percent handmade,” tailored denim overlays weave trendy with vintage, showcasing the young designer’s extraordinary talent. In less than a year, St. Lifer’s one-time hobby turned business venture has” blossomed into a reality right before my eyes.” Humbled by her own success, the Ocean Beach resident admits that “my dream evolved into a successful assembly line of artisan professionals who are dedicated to supporting each other.” Encouraged by “the environment” and “fellow artisans” the former New Yorker describes her journey as a step-by-step process that began with kudos. Within weeks of arriving in the coastal city, the “artisan shop gal” immersed herself in San Diego’s “maker’s culture,” a scene she describes as “big,” to learn everything she could about the local artisan ethos. “San Diego’s a small big city that hosts a large maker’s scene,” she said. “Artisans support artisans and local makers support each other. After creating my first jacket for fun, everyone encouraged me to pursue designing more.” St. Lifer designed her first jacket with a “deconstructed Banjara belt that I found in a flea market in Santa Cruz.” An instant hit, she fabricated more with vestiges from thrifting excursions – Afghan beads, Indian elephant designs and reconstructed handbags – “found in my closet.” Encouraged by the positive feedback, she tested her next batch on Instagram. When the entire inventory sold out within 48 hours, the budding fashionista knew she found her niche. The Maryland native quickly put her passion into action. Always “obsessed” with thrifting, St. Lifer continued her “treasure hunts” in Goodwill and Salvation Army stores, consignment shops, flea and farmer’s markets and second-hand boutique stores. “The magic really begins with thrifting through every consignment shop imaginable,” she continued. “Thrifting’s a passion. I’ve accumulated quite the unique collection of statement pieces – vintage band tee’s, ’80s denims, designer handbags, fabrics and textiles.” While honeymooning in Thailand, she “fell in love” with the country’s myriad of colored and patterned textiles and fabrics. African Mud Cloth became the lightbulb moment for making her brand “cohesive.” African Mud Cloth, a popular textile from Mali Africa, is made with fermented mud, a time-consuming process described as strange and cumbersome. The fabric contains a tapestry of colorful, detailed patterns popular in fashion, design and art. “African Mud Cloth speaks to my heart,” she said. “The hearty cloth is funky, versatile and beautiful. The colors are simple but the textile’s filled with intricate details. Pillows and throws are often made from huge pieces of this fabric. African Mud Cloth won’t fall off the trending bandwagon. It’s too classic and timeless.” St. Lifer’s refusal to use anything but vintage Levi jackets, makes production “more difficult because I don’t have a lot of inventory all at once.” However, St. Lifer has no plans to change jacket brand because “Levi’s a classic, great, American denim brand.” “Every Annie Margot Design jacket is a quality, handmade product,” she explained. “And I wouldn’t have it any other way.” While surprised by her instant success, St. Lifer’s not shocked. Annie Margot Designs has been “years in the making.” Touting a fashion and merchandising degree from West Virginia University, the Mountaineer has been thrifting since college, garnering ideas, inspirations and all things vintage. She moved to the Big Apple in 2009 to pursue a career in fashion, landing a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity as an intern in Fendi’ s Visual Merchandising Department. The tour-de-force turned employee became an assistant store manager within six years. New York City became a haven for collecting “precious possessions.” “I’m surprised, proud and excited by my success,” she said. “But I’m not shocked. I’ve put a lot of everything into Annie Margot Designs. My visions to create became distracted by life until I moved to San Diego. Despite working for an extraordinary company like Fendi in New York, here I focus on what I wanted to do among my people - other artisans. “I learned who I was in Morgantown,” she concluded. “In New York City I became her. Now I’m building my dream in Ocean Beach. Every stage along the way has made me more comfortable with who I am; designer Annie Margot St. Lifer – that’s who I am!” Annie Margot Designs also include zip pouches. Embellished jeans will soon follow. Custom orders are available. Annie Margot Designer jackets can be purchased in Ocean Beach’s Often Wander at Noon and Costal Natives; La Jolla’s Totem Boutique and Trilogy Sanctuary, as well as online at www.anniemargotdesigns.com.
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    Gail Cohen
    |
    February 14, 2018
    Gorgeous, great story.
    News
    Pacific Beach entrepreneur has it made in the shades
    If you live in San Diego, you probably recognize a few required living essentials: sunscreen, swimsuits, sandals and, according to San Diego State University graduate and entrepreneur Chase Fisher,...
    Published - Wednesday, February 14
    full story
    Cliff collapse at Sunset Cliffs near Ladera Street stairs
    It was reported on Feb. 13 that there was a partial cliff collapse at Sunset Cliffs near Ladera Street, and that the stairs leading down to Garbage Beach below have been closed. Peninsula Beacon fr...
    Published - Tuesday, February 13
    full story
    David Wells donates to military veterans' cause
    Former Major League Baseball and Point Loma High star David Wells is passionate about helping veterans of the U.S. military who are in need of medical and/or mental health assistance and cannot aff...
    Published - Tuesday, February 13
    full story
    Ocean Beach winery wins big at national competition
    Some say size matters. That bigger is better. But that doesn’t seem to be the case when it comes to producing super-premium wine. San Diego’s diminutive Gianni Buonomo Vintners in Ocean Beach was r...
    Published - Tuesday, February 13
    full story
    Flawless setting is just the beginning at Himitsu sushi restaurant
    Too many years ago to remember (much less admit), an ex kindly invited me out for a many-splendored evening of wine, rice and monkey brain. That last part drew a flinch of ignorance, as primates ar...
    Published - Monday, February 12
    full story
    Pop Pie Co. to take over Nati’s restaurant in Ocean Beach
    Nati’s is no more. The homespun, iconic Ocean Beach restaurant business, which opened in 1960, is being sold. “We are in escrow,” confirmed Marilyn Thomas, Nati’s current co-owner and operator, alo...
    Published - Monday, February 12
    full story
    Mathnasium of La Jolla: Making sense out of Math
    Kids are flexing their mathematical muscles at the Mathnasium of La Jolla. Mathnasium is one of more than 800 franchised math-only learning centers specializing in teaching kids math in a way that ...
    Published - Monday, February 12
    full story
    Body of man who fell off Crystal Pier recovered near La Jolla
    Lifeguards recovered a body off the coast of La Jolla on Sunday morning. Officials report that the body is that of Taylor Watts, 27, who fell off the Crystal Pier in Pacific Beach on Jan. 21. Watts...
    Published - Monday, February 12
    full story
    Point Loma Fish Shop is right at home on the Peninsula
    Seattle lays claim to the world’s largest private residential yacht, the 2014 NFL championship and approximately 154 percent of the nation’s total annual rainfall. It also boasts Pike Place Market,...
    Published - Monday, February 12
    full story
    Pile driving will be noisy during Shelter Island boat launch project
    The contractor on the Shelter Island boat launch improvement project has started conducting pile driving activities at the Shelter Island boat launch, which will continue through the end of March. ...
    Published - Monday, February 12
    full story
    Have you explored the top 11 hidden gems of Liberty Station?
    Liberty Station is well-known for being a culinary and cultural hub, but did you know the neighborhood holds secrets that most locals don’t even know about? In addition to its well-known landmarks ...
    Published - Monday, February 12
    full story
    Empanadas and alfajores: Paraná Empanadas to open kiosk in Westfield UTC
    It is a true thing of beauty to watch a small business grow. More than 10 years ago, Paraná Empanadas began purveying their authentic Argentinian (with a few twists) empanadas at the Ocean Beach, O...
    Published - Sunday, February 11
    full story
    LJHS has the only wrestling program in the area
    After a combined 297 years of existence among La Jolla’s three high schools, how can it be that only La Jolla High has a wrestling program? It’s a unique situation, and the demanding sport provides...
    Published - Sunday, February 11
    full story
    St. Paul’s Lutheran Church and School celebrates 75 years in Pacific Beach
    Right from the start, St. Paul’s Lutheran Church and School in Pacific Beach, celebrating its 75th anniversary this year, was built on its solid relationships among members sharing their faith. “Th...
    Published - Sunday, February 11
    full story
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    download Beach & Bay Press, February 8th, 2018
    Beach & Bay Press, February 8th, 2018
    The Peninsula Beacon, February 1st, 2018
    download The Peninsula Beacon, February 1st, 2018
    The Peninsula Beacon, February 1st, 2018