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    The Map project in La Jolla has stalled, more funds needed
    by DAVE SCHWAB
    Feb 21, 2019 | 3952 views | 0 0 comments | 5 5 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    With more than 100 life-sized mosaic images of local marine life, The Map will provide interactive, identification-based learning opportunities for schoolchildren and visitors each year to Kellogg Park.        DON BALCH / VILLAGE NEWS
    With more than 100 life-sized mosaic images of local marine life, The Map will provide interactive, identification-based learning opportunities for schoolchildren and visitors each year to Kellogg Park. DON BALCH / VILLAGE NEWS
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    It’s difficult to figure out whether the restoration of The Map project, a 2,400-square-foot mosaic depicting La Jolla Shores marine life, is a monumental work of art, or a cutting-edge educational tool. Actually, it’s both. The original Map, completed in 2008, deteriorated and had to be replaced. Its replacement is presently spread across the concrete floor inside a Scripps Institution of Oceanography building. The brainchild of famed, late centenarian Scripps oceanographer Walter Munk and his wife, Mary Coakley Munk, who represents nonprofit Friends of La Jolla Shores, creation of The LithoMosaic Map is nearing completion. Once funding is found, The Map is to be returned to its previous location, the educational plaza at Kellogg Park near the playground and restrooms. But there’s a problem: More money is needed to complete the project. The Munks have donated $300,000 to the project, with $500,000 yet needed to fund its installation, which will include educational panels and landscaping. Friends of La Jolla Shores and the Walter Munk Foundation for the Oceans are spearheading the project.  The timetable for funding and replacing The Map in Kellogg Park has been pushed back now to sometime in September, following Munk’s death, at age 101, on Feb. 8. Of The Map, Julie Scarpella, project restoration spokesperson said,“It’s very durable. Every tile is cut by hand, glued down by hand, one by one. It’s done in sections anchored in cement.” The Map represents Munk’s original pioneering research on waves. “Every department of SIO has been represented in this map,” said Scarpella. “It’s for the community. It’s for the park, representing Walter and all of his work.” Birch Aquarium and local public and private schools are expected to use The Map as a field trip destination. Scuba instructors can also use it as a visual reference, introducing students to local dive sites and marine life. Once in place, a three-foot-high fence will be installed around The Map’s perimeter to prevent people from using it as a thoroughfare to get to the surf. “It’s meant to keep people in, and keep people out, and as a safety precaution for kids,” noted Scarpella of the fence. “We just want to keep it a safe environment for kids.” Bill Kellogg of the La Jolla Beach & Tennis Club will provide daily maintenance for the project once it’s finished. The Map is being fabricated by San Diegans Wick Alexander and Robin Brailsford, who invented its LithoMosaic application technique. It features local sea life, underwater topography and resulting wave refraction. Scarpella added it will be a four- to six-month process to install The Map. once funding for it is secured. With more than 100 life-sized mosaic images of local marine life, The Map will provide interactive, identification-based learning opportunities for schoolchildren and visitors each year to Kellogg Park in La Jolla Shores. Scarpella added it will be a four- to six-month process to install The Map once funding for it is secured.
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    Mayor proposes new regulations for scooters and bikes
    Feb 15, 2019 | 27783 views | 0 0 comments | 7 7 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Electric scooters near the boardwalk in Mission Beach. Using geofencing technology, operators will be required to slow their devices down to eight miles per hour on the boardwalks in Mission Beach, Pacific Beach and La Jolla beach areas. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    Electric scooters near the boardwalk in Mission Beach. Using geofencing technology, operators will be required to slow their devices down to eight miles per hour on the boardwalks in Mission Beach, Pacific Beach and La Jolla beach areas. / Photo by Thomas Melville
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    On Feb. 14, Mayor Kevin L. Faulconer released a set of proposed regulations for dockless scooters and bicycles to address public safety concerns by slowing the devices down in heavily-trafficked public spaces, establish clear rules of the road to hold operators accountable, and charge an annual fee for each device. The proposed ordinance will be discussed at the City Council’s Feb. 20 Active Transportation and Infrastructure Committee meeting. Faulconer’s proposed regulations cover six primary areas – limiting maximum speed of motorized scooters in designated zones, vehicle staging and parking, rider education, data sharing, fees and legal indemnification for the City of San Diego. The mayor’s proposed regulations include: Permit and fees: Each company wishing to operate within City limits will be issued a six-month permit and will be required to pay $150 per device annually. Operators will only be allowed to amend or renew their permit, including increasing the size of their fleet, during the permit issuance months of January and June. Companies offering an approved equity program can receive a $15 per device reduction in their annual fee. Operators will also be required to pay a “performance bond,” which can be returned in the event they cease operation in San Diego and remove their devices.  Limiting speed: Using geofencing technology, operators will be required to slow their devices down to eight miles per hour in designated high-pedestrian traffic zones around the City, including: - Boardwalks in Mission Beach, Pacific Beach and La Jolla beach areas; - Spanish Landing; - Petco Park; - Balboa Park; - NTC Park; - Mission Bay Park. In two other areas in downtown San Diego, scooters will be required to slow to three miles per hour, with riders being notified they are in a no-ride zone. Those areas are:  - North and South Embarcadero; - Martin Luther King Jr. Promenade. Staging and parking: Operators may stage their devices in groups of up to four, and there must be 40 feet between groups of staged devices. They will also be prohibited from staging in school zones and hospital zones. Additionally, users will be prohibited from ending their rides in some areas, including the beach area boardwalks, the perimeter of Petco Park and the north and south Embarcadero walks in downtown. The City will encourage residents to report misplaced or abandoned bikes and scooters through the “Get It Done” application. Operators will be notified of the reports and will have three hours to remove the devices or face potential impound and associated fees.   City indemnification: Each operator will be required to indemnify the City from liability claims and each will need to hold a liability insurance policy. Rider education: Prior to each use, companies will be required to educate riders of local and state vehicle and traffic codes and the cost of a citation for violating those laws. Each device also will need to be clearly labeled “Riding on Sidewalks is Prohibited” and include operator age requirements. “The City of San Diego is taking a smart approach to dockless mobility,” said Colin Parent, executive director of Circulate San Diego. “San Diego is ensuring access to new transportation choices, while balancing the needs of other users of the public right-of-way.”  Data sharing: The operators will provide the City with detailed monthly reports that will be useful for Climate Action Plan monitoring and mobility planning, including but not limited to: - Deployed Device Data, including fleet size and utilization rates; - Trip information, including start/end points, routes, distances and duration; - Parking information; - Reported incidents and actions taken; - Reported obstructions/hazards and actions taken; - Maintenance activities. “We welcome more mobility options and these new regulations take a common-sense approach that will allow this emerging market to grow in a responsible way,” Faulconer said. “Scooters and e-bikes are providing an opportunity for thousands of people to get around town without a car, creating less traffic and cutting greenhouse gas emissions.” “I am pleased to see the City adopt sensible regulations for dockless scooters and bicycles that prioritizes public safety and embraces the sharing economy,” said City Councilmember Chris Cate. “Resolving this issue has been one of my top priorities, and I am appreciative that my solutions will be implemented.”
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    Do you know what to do if you find a stray kitten?
    by EMILY BLACKWOOD
    Feb 13, 2019 | 15145 views | 0 0 comments | 5 5 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Photo courtesy of the San Diego Humane Society
    Photo courtesy of the San Diego Humane Society
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    Of course, your first instinct is to snuggle them, but that might not be the best idea. With kitten season approaching this spring, the San Diego Human Society wants local residents to be aware of the exact steps to take when you find a stray kitten.

    According to the organization’s Kitten Nursery manager Jakie Noble, nearly 3,000 0- to 8-week-old kittens were turned into the humane society last year. And there are typically two “waves” of kittens; one when the weather starts to warm up in spring and another in the fall.

    With so many kittens being born, there’s a greater chance for people to find them. So while leaving a kitten alone is probably one of the hardest things to do, it is the first step.

    “The most common mistake people make when they find kittens is they panic and remove the kittens from their environment right away,” Noble said, adding that it’s important to first assess the situation. Ask yourself if the kitten is in danger of predators, if it’s injured or if it appears to be cold or hungry.

    “If the kitten(s) are warm and quietly snuggled together, the likelihood is that the mother cat may be close by, waiting for the human to leave her nesting spot,” Noble said. “If you find a kitten alone, this could mean the mother cat is moving her litter to another nesting spot. Mom uses her mouth to pick up and move the kittens, so she can only move one kitten at a time. Be careful not to ‘steal’ a kitten she may be returning to move."

    As much as most people would love to, not everyone has enough time to sit and wait to see if the mother cat comes back. That’s when you can use what Noble calls the “flour trick.”

    “Take a small amount of flour and make a ring around the nest area. Watch from a safe distance to see if mom returns. Come back in a few hours. If you see paw prints in the flour, this is a sure sign that the mother cat is around and tending to her kittens.”

    If the mother cat does not return for her kitten(s), then it’s time to take action. If you have the availability and knowledge to take on the kittens, do so, but if you don’t, bring them to your local shelter so they can be properly evaluated and taken care of. But don’t forget about the mother cat.

    “Every effort should be made to catch/trap the mother cat too,” Noble said. “If an un-spayed cat no longer has kittens, she can immediately go back into heat and have another litter of kittens in just 60 days. The only way to break the cycle of kittens being born is to take responsibility for spaying and neutering outdoor community cats.”

    And if you do decide to take the kitten(s) in — even temporarily — Noble warns that they shouldn't be fed right away. In fact, the priority should be to get the kitten(s) warm before they eat because a cold kitten can’t successfully digest foot.

    When the kitten is warmed up, be sure you feed it the right diet, which is not cow’s milk, human food or cereal. Instead, go to your local pet supply store and buy kitten milk replacer. If you don’t have access to that, it’s important to seek assistance from our local rescue group, vet clinic or animal shelter.

    For more information about kitten care and kitten adoptions, visit sdhumane.org.

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    FROM MY GARDEN – Get ready now to grow grapes in the garden
    by LINDA MARRONE
    Feb 10, 2019 | 9360 views | 0 0 comments | 11 11 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    I wired my Cabernet Sauvignon grapevine to an old fig vine that covers the garden walls. 		     
LINDA MARRONE / VILLAGE NEWS
    I wired my Cabernet Sauvignon grapevine to an old fig vine that covers the garden walls. LINDA MARRONE / VILLAGE NEWS
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    February is the month to prune back grapevines and it is also the perfect time to plant one in your garden.  About 14 years ago, I purchased a small dormant grapevine that was labeled Cabernet Sauvignon and planted it in my garden where it has flourished over the years.  Each spring, tender green leaves and tiny blossoms appear, and by summer, clusters of beautiful purple grapes form.  When fall arrives, the vines leaves decorate the garden in autumn colors of orange and gold.   A hearty and beautiful addition to the gardenscape, grapevines are long-lived, easy to grow and will produce their fruit with minimum care.  Most nurseries sell grapevines during the winter months when they are dormant and about one to two years old.  Select a variety that is self-fertile or you will need to plant more than one vine for pollination.  Also think about the type of grapes you like to eat.  While my cabernet vine and grapes are attractive, the fruit has large seeds and I use it more as a decorative element and let the birds enjoy the fruit. Vigorous growers, the vine could still take about four years to establish and begin to bear its fruit.  I was told to remove any blossoms or the early stages of grapes that appear on young sprouts the first few years after it is planted. This process will allow the central vine to grow stronger and later produce an abundance of grapes as it matures.  Plant your vine in well-drained soil that has exposure to full sun and in an area where you can give the vine support by attaching it to a trellis, arbor, or wall.   Grapes require a fair amount of water, but not a lot of fertilizer.  You do not need to fertilize your grapevine the first year after you plant it, but keep the soil from drying out in between watering during its growing season from spring through fall.  I feed my mature vine with a little organic bone meal in February for nitrogen to encourage growth and in the early spring, I fertilize it once with Eleanor's VF-11 fertilizer that seems to have the right amounts of phosphorus and potassium to form the fruit.  An occasional spray of water from the garden hose will keep aphids in check.   They seem to be the only pests that invade my vine. Pruning back the vine in February before spring arrives is important since grapes will only form on the new branches.  The side branches growing off the main vine are known as "laterals."  Shorten each lateral branch where it still has one or two "nodes."  Nodes are the little bumps that appear on the naked vine where its leaves once grew.  The nodes sprout new branches in the spring that will produce small masses of blossoms and the grape clusters will begin to form as the blossoms fade.  As the days grow warmer the grapes will grow larger, and my Cabernet grapes turn from green to red and as the end of summer nears they ripen into a rich purple hue.   The tender leaves that appear on the vine in spring can be used for stuffed grape leaves when they are about 4-5 inches across.  Grapes are usually ready for harvest by late summer and when you prune your vines branches in February, save them to create grapevine wreaths.
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    Girard Gourmet owners serve up cookies – and marriage advice – for Valentine’s Day
    by EMILY BLACKWOOD
    Feb 10, 2019 | 1142 views | 0 0 comments | 14 14 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Diana and François Goedhuys are the magic behind Girard Gourmet. 	/  EMILY BLACKWOOD / VILLAGE NEWS
    Diana and François Goedhuys are the magic behind Girard Gourmet. / EMILY BLACKWOOD / VILLAGE NEWS
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    Most people move to San Diego for the weather, a change in scenery or the fish tacos. But Diana Goedhuys had something else persuading her to leave Houston and come to the West Coast. “A proposal of marriage,” she said, laughing while sitting next to her partner in life and business, François Goedhuys. “I was on the East Coast, and he finally proposed, so it was time to come out here.” Growing up on a small farm in Belgium, François Goedhuys attended pastry school in Antwerp and went on to work as a baker in Brussels and Switzerland before he moved to the United States in 1968. Soon, he found himself owning and operating a bakery and restaurant in Houston. It was there that he met Diana Goedhuys through his son, who attended the small private school that she owned. Then in 1987, François Goedhuys packed up and moved to La Jolla, where he opened Girard Gourmet on Girard Avenue on Aug. 1 that year. About three years later, Diana Goedhuys joined him, and he realized he could use some help with his business. “I was baking day and night,” he said. So Diana Goedhuys – who had owned and ran her school for 15 years – started helping him with customers and the business side of things so he could focus on what he does best: making delicious and beautiful desserts. After almost 30 years of marriage, running a successful business and keeping up their organic garden in Julian together, they’ve got it down to a science. “There’s advantages and disadvantages I guess,” Françoise Goedhuys said, smiling. “We’re so used to each other now.” But that doesn’t mean there aren’t surprises. “Somebody will come and ask for a cookie, and I'll have a little idea of what he could do,” Diana Goedhuys said. “Then he comes and does something completely different that’s brilliant and beautiful.” “I’m always amazed at what he comes up with,” she said. Valentine’s Day Cookies Girard Gourmet is already making their popular Valentine’s Day cookies. Small cookies start at $6, the larger cookies start at $10, and both have the option to personalize. Visit the shop at 7837 Girard Ave. or go to girardgourmet.com.
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    News
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