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    The first and still the best, Paskowitz surf camps continue this summer in Pacific Beach
    Feb 21, 2019 | 2549 views | 0 0 comments | 5 5 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Legendary surfer Dorian Paskowitz started the Pacific Beach surf camps in 1972.    /   PHOTO CONTRIBUTED
    Legendary surfer Dorian Paskowitz started the Pacific Beach surf camps in 1972. / PHOTO CONTRIBUTED
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    The Paskowitzs, known as the first family of surfing, are continuing the summer surf-camp tradition their pioneering father, Dorian, started nearly 50 years ago, by holding surf camps in Pacific Beach July 14 to Aug. 3. Billed as the nation’s longest-running surf camp, Israel (Izzy) Paskowitz talked about what individuals and families may expect from one of their camps.  “Our students learn the basics right away. That’s really important,” Izzy noted adding the formula for success for the small, family-run business is simple.  As stated on their website, the objective of surf instruction is to “go at your own pace, warm water, sunny beaches, great people in the water and on the beach and delicious food. … We will teach you the correct basic skills to stand up, then you will ride waves standing on your own. We started the business of surf schools and will always maintain the best surf instructors in the world.”   Founded by legendary surfer Dorian Paskowitz in 1972 with his wife and nine children, the Paskowitz Surf Camp runs classes each summer in California, Mexico, and Montauk, N.Y. The family welcomes and teaches surfers of all ages.  During its history, Paskowitz Surf Camp has introduced countless ordinary people – and plenty of famous people from music, movies and business – to the laid-back surfing lifestyle. “We went back to our roots teaching surfing in North PB in San Diego,” said Paskowitz noting his father, Dorian, was a doctor from Galveston, Texas. Dorian was asthmatic and first experienced surfing in San Diego, which he found to be therapeutic, when manmade Mission Bay was  just a “mud flat in the ’30s.” “He was a lifeguard and started teaching surfing, before he moved to Hawaii, the epicenter of surfing. He then returned to San Diego to teach surfing at Tourmaline Surf Park in 1972,” said Izzy. “The format was always the same, teaching people to surf safely with credible instructors, the best guys on the beach.” Forty-seven years later, Paskowitz surf camps still offer individual instruction, day camps, group lessons, corporate surf seminars and weekly overnight camps in classic, tent-style campgrounds at Campland on the Bay.  Weekly surf camps accommodate 20 students with two-to-one instruction and overnight stays at Campland that Paskowitz said includes campfires, barbecues, healthy meals and lots of activities and distractions. Campland amenities include fitness centers, skateboard and basketball courts, watersport rentals and a supervised kids’ activities program. The Paskowitz family also runs a nonprofit, Surfers Healing Foundation, which has taught autistic kids surfing since 1996. Paskowitz surf camps To register for this summer’s Pacific Beach surf camps, visit paskowitz.com/camps.
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    Education Notebook: Schoolyard Dash 5K and 1-Mile Kids Run is Feb. 24
    Feb 20, 2019 | 2014 views | 0 0 comments | 5 5 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Crown Point Junior Music Academy Principal Lopez was a good sport as he was covered in powdered paint by Mrs. Tessaro-Love’s first grade class. Students earned the most pledge participation for the CPJMA jog-a-thon event that took place on Jan. 31.
    Crown Point Junior Music Academy Principal Lopez was a good sport as he was covered in powdered paint by Mrs. Tessaro-Love’s first grade class. Students earned the most pledge participation for the CPJMA jog-a-thon event that took place on Jan. 31.
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    Barnard students Fiona S. and Emma K. play the hulusi at the school’s annual Chinese New Year community festival. Barnard Mandarin Magnet Elementary School celebrated Chinese New Year with a week of festivities.
    Barnard students Fiona S. and Emma K. play the hulusi at the school’s annual Chinese New Year community festival. Barnard Mandarin Magnet Elementary School celebrated Chinese New Year with a week of festivities.
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    Pacific Beach Middle Mandarin immersion students, teachers, and volunteers planned a Spring Festival to celebrate the Lunar New Year. Activities included traditional arts and crafts, and fun contests including a table-top ping-pong tournament. Students and volunteers decorated the media center and led a New Year’s Door Decorating contest.
    Pacific Beach Middle Mandarin immersion students, teachers, and volunteers planned a Spring Festival to celebrate the Lunar New Year. Activities included traditional arts and crafts, and fun contests including a table-top ping-pong tournament. Students and volunteers decorated the media center and led a New Year’s Door Decorating contest.
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    Mission Bay High - Japanese Friendship Garden Series continues through April 25 at the Inamori Pavilion, Japanese Friendship Garden in Balboa Park. Experience live music in one of San Diego’s beautiful historical landmarks, while supporting music education in San Diego. Organized and produced by the music students of MBHS, all profits from the concerts will go to the Mission Bay High School music program to help the Mission Bay Preservationists travel to perform in Japan in April. For more information, go to missionbaymusic.com.   Pacific Beach Middle - A school tour will take place 8 a.m. Thursday, March 7. Sign in at the front office and gather in the library to meet Principal Kimberly Meng and IB coordinator Jennifer Sims and learn about the variety of programs offered and exciting changes coming to PBMS. A tour of the school will follow. - Zoe Levin, an eighth grader at Pacific Beach Middle, has begun a school project offering lessons and stories of the Holocaust. “With this project, through lessons and stories of the Holocaust, I hope to teach my peers the dangers of hatred and prejudice, along with the ideas of remembrance, empathy and hope,” said Levin. “I strongly believe in this project, because education given on the Holocaust is declining, and younger generations are becoming less aware of the events during this important time in history. My project aims to improve upon this within the community of PBMS and Pacific Beach as a whole.” In 2018, Levin invited a Holocaust survivor to speak at PBMS. “From this experience, I learned how one act could strongly impact a group of both my peers and teachers alike,” she said. “This year, I hope to show the documentary, ‘Not the Last Butterfly,’ to the seventh-grade class. Following the viewing, students will be given the opportunity to paint ceramic butterflies as part of The Butterfly Project (thebutterflyprojectnow.org/)." Levin noted the butterfly project “aims to create a total of 1.5 million ceramic butterflies around the world, representing each of the children murdered during the Holocaust.” Through donations, Levin has raised the fee of $180 to show the documentary, and $144 to buy the butterflies and supplies. Those interested in supporting her efforts can reach Levin at zoe.levin1@gmail.com.   Pacific Beach Elementary - A big thank you to all the local businesses who have supported FOPBE's annual fundraising auction. To buy tickets or sponsor the event, held on April 26, visit pbe.schoolauction.net/speakeasy/. Kate Sessions Elementary - On Feb. 11, Sessions offered parents a morning coffee with the San Diego Unified Police. The focus of "Coffee with the Cops" was to strengthen community relations, identify community safety concerns, and provide resources and supports for families. There was a question and answer portion at the completion of the presentation where parents were able to get information about plans that are in place in the event of a natural disaster or a lock-down situation. The police also spoke about cyber bullying and the dangers of vaping. Feedback after the coffee was that there is a need for the police to come back and speak to the fifth graders. Barnard Mandarin Magnet Elementary - Barnard Mandarin Magnet Elementary School celebrated Chinese New Year with a week of festivities. Traditional Chinese lion dancers kicked off the celebration during the Monday morning assembly on Feb. 4. On Feb. 8, students from each classroom staged spirited cultural performances for their families that highlighted different Chinese arts, including dance, song, martial arts, skits, and more. Barnard’s free, community-wide Chinese New Year festival was held on Feb. 9. Attendees enjoyed hours of entertainment, food, and games throughout the day. Barnard students were also featured performers at Balboa Park’s House of China celebration.  “I love my school’s Chinese New Year festival because I get to perform on the stage in front of so many people,” said fourth grade student Fiona S., who performed a tai chi fan dance, a lantern dance, taiko drumming, and a duet on the hulusi (a Chinese gourd instrument). “I have been practicing after school several days a week since September. The last four weeks I’ve been practicing even more. The hard work definitely paid off.” Barnard’s performance troupes took to the main stage at the Downtown Chinese New Year Festival on Feb. 16 and 17. Until then... Xīn nián kuài lè! Happy New Year. Crown Point Junior Music Academy - ASB students ran a Kindness Week from Feb. 11-15. Students came together with a fun week of spirit days, and spread kindness throughout the school. ASB fourth-grade representative, Melody Twiligar, said, “We wanted to spread kindness to all the kids at our school and just make them smile.” FOPBSS - Registration for the 2019 Schoolyard Dash 5K and 1-Mile Kids Run is open and sign up is at schoolyarddash.org.  The sixth annual Schoolyard Dash 5K and 1 Mile Kids Fun Run is a way to raise money for Pacific Beach Middle and Mission Bay High schools. Join them on Sunday, Feb. 24, to run or walk with family and friends at De Anza Cove along the Mission Bay running path. Breakfast, snacks, coffee, and drinks will follow the race and top runners will be recognized. - The next FOPBSS meeting will take place 6 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 27 at Mission Bay High School library.
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    Mission Bay family ‘puts the nut in nutritious’ with healthy Perfect Bar
    by LUCIA VITI
    Feb 19, 2019 | 9888 views | 0 0 comments | 4 4 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Along with Perfect Bar, the brand has expanded with Perfect Snacks, Perfect Bites and Perfect Kids. / Courtesy Photo
    Along with Perfect Bar, the brand has expanded with Perfect Snacks, Perfect Bites and Perfect Kids. / Courtesy Photo
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    The Perfect Bar. Bar. None. Launched by the Keith family from Mission Beach, Perfect Bar is unlike any other nutritional supplement food bar on the market. Touted as “real food that requires refrigeration,” Perfect Bar is simply delicious. Best. Taste. Ever. Healthy nut butter fats (peanuts, almonds, hazelnuts, cashews) and seeds are packed with organic superfoods, vitamins, minerals and organic honey in a myriad of flavors. The non-GMO, project verified, certified gluten-free, kosher, whole food protein is void of emulsifiers, whey, soy lecithin, hydrogenated oils and artificial preservatives and sweeteners. Organic honey binds ingredients while refrigeration keeps the bar fresh for up to six months. Co-founder and CEO Bill Keith claims to have “put the nut in nutritious,” while never compromising “taste for health, no matter how busy life gets.” The legacy of Perfect Bar began with Bud Keith, Bill’s father, a health food pioneer before health food was cliché. Dad, a self-taught naturopath, worked with Jack La Lane, formulating nutritional products and supplements while traveling – with the family homeschooled and living in a motorhome – to universities to lecture on nutrition. Bud introduced his first protein powder in the ’70s and owned and operated Healthouse, the first gym and juice bar located in Mission Beach. Bill describes the elder as one of the founding fathers of the health and wellness industry. Bud manipulated mega health and super foods into protein powders, supplements and “food on the go” to keep the family well-fed. Bar recipes included super foods like kale, carrots, sweet potatoes, spinach and lemons, and supplements mixed with freshly-ground organic peanut butter, organic honey and whole food proteins. “Dad’s concoctions were made of nutrients, proteins, vitamins and minerals made from concentrated mega food sources versus chemicals and synthetic derivates,” said Keith. “Through trial and error, Dad tinkered until we took one bite and declared, ‘It’s perfect!’ and the Perfect Bar recipe was born. We sold our bars the way other kids sold lemonade, rolling them in small batches and selling them to anyone who’d buy them.” When the patriarch fell victim to skin cancer, Bill, the oldest of 13 siblings, gathered the family now living in Northern California to find ways to sustain the family’s financial responsibilities. While tossing ideas around, one constant remained, “turning Dad’s refrigerated protein bar recipe into a business.” The family purchased a packaging machine and moved to Sacramento. Mom and Dad returned to Mission Beach where Bud wished to spend the remainder of his life. As with most businesses, the first year was “tough.” “We had a great product but I had little traction securing appointments,” said Keith. With one month of finances left, Keith met the Berkley Whole Foods Grocery team leader at a Harmony Festival who “made it her mission to put me in that single store,” for 30 days. Determined, Keith slept in his car and showered in the gym while driving between Berkley and Sacramento where family members were rolling and packaging bars. Sales exceeded expectations. Ten more stores were added. The family moved the operation to Mission Beach – to be closer to Mom and Dad – leveraging sales through “natural brands like Whole Foods and Sprouts.” Keith expanded regionally from Colorado before expanding nationally in 2009. By now, the Keith’s had been hand-rolling bars – with rolling pins – for almost seven years. Refusing to give in to automation – extruding machines of dry bars – that would shortcut quality, they opted for semi-automation by tweaking cheesecake making equipment. Trademark and rebranding the bar’s packaging to “clearly” articulate their “off the beaten path” story worked in tandem with the acquisition of an investment company and a string of “talented folks” to fill the “executive suites.” Four years later, sales landed Perfect Bar to the No. 3 best-selling national food brand bar. Food scientists continue to “create flavor extensions” from the family’s original seven flavors. Successful sales dictate successful flavors. “Flavors need to make dollars and cents,” said Keith. “While Dad taught us the how of nutrition, you just can’t take a scientific approach, it has to taste good.” The Keith’s recently launched, Perfect Snacks, Perfect Bites and Perfect Kids because “happy kids start with happy bellies.” The family has no intention of slowing down. “We’re invigorated by emails that say our bars helped patients get through chemotherapy because of how easy it is to eat (soft, cookie-dough texture) and digest,” said Keith. “We’ve even had doctors write prescriptions for Perfect Bar.” Keith describes his family’s success as emblematic of the “American dream.” “Thank God for America and the ability to do what we’ve done,” he concluded. “Dad has since passed, but his spirit lives on in our bars. The Perfect Bar story is a story of triumph over tragedy.” Perfect Bar Find your Perfect Bar locally at Sprouts, Vons, Ralphs, Gelson’s, Target, CVS, and 7-Eleven stores throughout the area. For more information, visit Perfectbar.com.
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    Rose Creek needs more friends and volunteers; advocates want waterway made into open-space park
    by DAVE SCHWAB
    Feb 17, 2019 | 9403 views | 3 3 comments | 6 6 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Rose Creek has become a dumping ground for trash, as well as a haven for homeless encampments. / Photo by Dave Schwab
    Rose Creek has become a dumping ground for trash, as well as a haven for homeless encampments. / Photo by Dave Schwab
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    Rose Creek is a San Diego urban stream draining into Mission Bay, which flows north-south through Rose Canyon and San Clemente Canyon and their tributary canyons. / Photo by Dave Schwab
    Rose Creek is a San Diego urban stream draining into Mission Bay, which flows north-south through Rose Canyon and San Clemente Canyon and their tributary canyons. / Photo by Dave Schwab
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    Rose Creek isn’t getting the attention it deserves. At least not according to local environmentalists, who insist restoring and maintaining the wetlands environment there is key to preserving the health of Mission Bay.  “Rose Creek is an amazing place to visit, there’s great birds, plants, and all we’re asking is for the city to take great responsibility for the area,” said Karin Zirk, spokesperson for Friends of Rose Creek, a nonprofit whose vision is for lower Rose Creek to be turned it into an open-space park providing recreational and educational opportunities. “Rose Creek is where land meets nature,” pointed out Paula Gandolfo, a PB planner and community activist and gardener. “As we, man, increase in numbers, we’re having a bigger impact on nature. And this is the watershed where it’s happening here in San Diego.” “Rose Creek is a tremendous asset to Mission Bay,” noted Kristen Victor, who is spearheading the drive to turn Pacific Beach into a full-blown EcoDistrict promoting environmental sustainability. “I believe that future opportunities (with Rose Creek) are just flowing.” Rose Creek is a San Diego urban stream draining into Mission Bay, which flows north-south through Rose Canyon and San Clemente Canyon and their tributary canyons. The Rose Creek watershed comprises about 36 square miles. Rose Creek, however, was diverted and channelized in the first half of the 20th century. It now enters Mission Bay through an artificial channel. The wetland where the creek historically entered Mission Bay is now known as the Kendall Frost Marsh, and is studied and managed by UC San Diego. The Rose Creek Watershed Alliance was created in 2005 to create a plan to improve the watershed. The plan was accepted by the City of San Diego in 2008.  Friends of Rose Creek conducts periodic cleanups in the waterway. The city has applied for a permit to clear vegetation from the lower creek channel, in an effort to prevent flooding. Friends of Rose Creek has a “game plan” for restoring the luster of Rose Creek that includes: - Maintaining and enhancing the existing linear natural park along Rose Creek between Rose Canyon and Marian Bear Open Space Parks in the north and Mission Bay Park in the south. - Connecting the entire Rose Creek Watershed into one City administrative unit in order to manage the area in the way nature functions. - Finding the best and safest ways to link Rose Creek waterway with the new trolley stop to be constructed at Balboa Avenue nearby, by improving freeway crossings in the area making them safer for bicyclists, pedestrians and wildlife. - Eventual creation of a wetlands interpretive and research center in partnership with UC San Diego. - Aiding county, state and federal funding sources that are paying for habitat restoration and passive recreational amenities, along with stormwater projects including water-quality improvements. On a recent tour of a section of Rose Creek in Pacific Beach, Zirk, Gandolfo and Victor walked the cluttered and clogged waterway, whose problems are self-evident. The waterway is a dumping ground for trash, as well as a haven for homeless encampments. “There’s trash, lots of it, including car batteries,” noted Gandolfo during the tour. “[Friends of Rose Creek] do two big cleanups a year with I love a Clean San Diego,” said Zirk. “During the past 15 years, our average haul has been four tons of trash a year. Some years, we might pull in six tons.” Zirk addressed a different problem with the creek. “The whole area is full of invasive plant species, which constrict the waterway and prevents the water from flowing,” she said. Gandolfo noted the waterway is increasingly popular for people. “With an increase in the volume (of people) comes an increase in the waste,” she said. “And an increase in waste includes biological waste, e coli bacteria (from human waste), which ends up in this waterway and eventually, out in the ocean.” “So far, the city has tried to say they’re not responsible for this trash in Rose Creek,” said Zirk, adding there are presently only two trash cans serviced solely by volunteers for people to dispose of their trash along the waterway’s PB section. “It needs to be more accessible,” said Victor of what has to be done to improve Rose Creek, especially given that the new trolley station will undoubtedly increase the volume of both motorized and non-motorized traffic in the area. “It’s been in the PB Community Plan since the early ’90s that Rose Creek should be parkland,” contends Zirk. “The city is saying the reason why it can’t be parkland is because it’s in the Stormwater and Transportation Department. But that department doesn’t engage with the community, whereas parks and rec would engage with the community.” In the final analysis, Zirk said the creek, and volunteers working to preserve it, need help. “Won’t you join us?” she asked.
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    rshimizu20
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    February 18, 2019
    They should make some people that are arrested in that area do community service and clean up that area.
    Buffalo Barnes
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    February 18, 2019
    North of the Garnet Ave. bridge, pictured above, is a "no man's land" of trash, hobo jungles, trash, stolen bikes and scooters, etc. dumped in the creek. Not to mention crazed and smacked out people circling the drain of addiction. Just walking through the underpass can be a sketchy situation. I live about 50 yards down from the bridge and watch the ebb and flow of homeless and residents of the area and walk my dog along the Homeless Highway (bike path) picking up trash and all manner of discarded flotsam and jetsam of the wandering lost souls.
    beets 42
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    February 18, 2019
    You may be able to get a grant to restore the creek from CDFW (Calif. Dept. of Fish and Wildlife) to restore it, especially if tied in with the marsh, and more so, if the stream could (especially if it did at one time) support steelhead. They have continuing grants.

    The stream might better support fish if there were a greater flow of water. That would also help move water through Mission Bay. It's been reported in the past that the eastern areas of the Bay don't have enough movement of water.

    Additional water might be obtained by releasing some of the recycled water from the Miramar plant. In the past, a lot of that has gone to waste. If it's pure enough to drink, it should be pure enough for the creek (that might take an act of Congress).
    Pacific Beach couple starting a movement with buckets, grabbers and Instagram
    by DAVE SCHWAB
    Feb 16, 2019 | 4764 views | 1 1 comments | 8 8 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Natalie Sollock (above) and Charley Kausen of Pacific Beach started picking up trash in the community.
    Natalie Sollock (above) and Charley Kausen of Pacific Beach started picking up trash in the community.
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    Charley Kausen and Natalie Sollock of Pacific Beach are voluntarily picking up trash in the community and urging others to follow suit by providing an incentive to “Don’t Trash PB.” For a $15 Venmo mobile pay service “loan,” they’ll provide a branded bucket and hand-controlled extension trash “grabber” for others committing to doing their own community clean-up. “We send the person $5 back each time they send us a picture of their bucket full of garbage via email or post and tag us on Instagram,” Kausen and Sollock said in an email. “If they fill the bucket three times – the bucket, and grabber, are theirs forever. If at any time they don't want to participate, they can return the bucket and grabber and get any remaining deposit back in full.” They said the Venmo deposit is merely a way to ensure people actually use both clean-up tools provided, and not just let them sit in their garages. Discussing the origin of their clean-up project named “Don’t Trash PB,” Sollock said, “Charley was obsessive picking up trash every day on our walk to the beach, picking it up with his hands. Then we wised up and picked up a bucket and grabber.” Soon, the pair were out there showing and doing by personal example. It got attention, and results. “People started shouting at us out of their (car) windows, ‘Hey, what are you guys doing?’” said Kausen, adding others expressed interest in joining once told. “It finally dawned on us that all others needed to get involved was their own bucket and grabber,” said Sollock, adding that, by buying in bulk, they were able to bring the cost for the two pick-up tools down to about $10. “We then flocked to Instagram to help spread the word about it,” she added. The pair said a dozen or more people have taken them up on their bucket-and-grabber offer. And the word is spreading. “We don’t really have a mission statement,” said Sollock. “The whole idea was just to get people actively cleaning up in their own neighborhoods. We just wanted to provide the tools for them to do that.” To get a bucket and grabber, people can reach out to Kausen and Sollock on Instagram @donttrashpb, or email donttrashpb@gmail.com.
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    Buffalo Barnes
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    February 17, 2019
    I do the same thing along Rose Creek (aka-The Homeless Highway) and other areas. Banning plastic straws? Ban 'to go' cups and tops too. So MANY of them just dropped along the streets along with empty and likely stolen Amazon boxes and envelopes.
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