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    Mission Bay family ‘puts the nut in nutritious’ with healthy Perfect Bar
    by LUCIA VITI
    Feb 19, 2019 | 9899 views | 0 0 comments | 4 4 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Along with Perfect Bar, the brand has expanded with Perfect Snacks, Perfect Bites and Perfect Kids. / Courtesy Photo
    Along with Perfect Bar, the brand has expanded with Perfect Snacks, Perfect Bites and Perfect Kids. / Courtesy Photo
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    The Perfect Bar. Bar. None. Launched by the Keith family from Mission Beach, Perfect Bar is unlike any other nutritional supplement food bar on the market. Touted as “real food that requires refrigeration,” Perfect Bar is simply delicious. Best. Taste. Ever. Healthy nut butter fats (peanuts, almonds, hazelnuts, cashews) and seeds are packed with organic superfoods, vitamins, minerals and organic honey in a myriad of flavors. The non-GMO, project verified, certified gluten-free, kosher, whole food protein is void of emulsifiers, whey, soy lecithin, hydrogenated oils and artificial preservatives and sweeteners. Organic honey binds ingredients while refrigeration keeps the bar fresh for up to six months. Co-founder and CEO Bill Keith claims to have “put the nut in nutritious,” while never compromising “taste for health, no matter how busy life gets.” The legacy of Perfect Bar began with Bud Keith, Bill’s father, a health food pioneer before health food was cliché. Dad, a self-taught naturopath, worked with Jack La Lane, formulating nutritional products and supplements while traveling – with the family homeschooled and living in a motorhome – to universities to lecture on nutrition. Bud introduced his first protein powder in the ’70s and owned and operated Healthouse, the first gym and juice bar located in Mission Beach. Bill describes the elder as one of the founding fathers of the health and wellness industry. Bud manipulated mega health and super foods into protein powders, supplements and “food on the go” to keep the family well-fed. Bar recipes included super foods like kale, carrots, sweet potatoes, spinach and lemons, and supplements mixed with freshly-ground organic peanut butter, organic honey and whole food proteins. “Dad’s concoctions were made of nutrients, proteins, vitamins and minerals made from concentrated mega food sources versus chemicals and synthetic derivates,” said Keith. “Through trial and error, Dad tinkered until we took one bite and declared, ‘It’s perfect!’ and the Perfect Bar recipe was born. We sold our bars the way other kids sold lemonade, rolling them in small batches and selling them to anyone who’d buy them.” When the patriarch fell victim to skin cancer, Bill, the oldest of 13 siblings, gathered the family now living in Northern California to find ways to sustain the family’s financial responsibilities. While tossing ideas around, one constant remained, “turning Dad’s refrigerated protein bar recipe into a business.” The family purchased a packaging machine and moved to Sacramento. Mom and Dad returned to Mission Beach where Bud wished to spend the remainder of his life. As with most businesses, the first year was “tough.” “We had a great product but I had little traction securing appointments,” said Keith. With one month of finances left, Keith met the Berkley Whole Foods Grocery team leader at a Harmony Festival who “made it her mission to put me in that single store,” for 30 days. Determined, Keith slept in his car and showered in the gym while driving between Berkley and Sacramento where family members were rolling and packaging bars. Sales exceeded expectations. Ten more stores were added. The family moved the operation to Mission Beach – to be closer to Mom and Dad – leveraging sales through “natural brands like Whole Foods and Sprouts.” Keith expanded regionally from Colorado before expanding nationally in 2009. By now, the Keith’s had been hand-rolling bars – with rolling pins – for almost seven years. Refusing to give in to automation – extruding machines of dry bars – that would shortcut quality, they opted for semi-automation by tweaking cheesecake making equipment. Trademark and rebranding the bar’s packaging to “clearly” articulate their “off the beaten path” story worked in tandem with the acquisition of an investment company and a string of “talented folks” to fill the “executive suites.” Four years later, sales landed Perfect Bar to the No. 3 best-selling national food brand bar. Food scientists continue to “create flavor extensions” from the family’s original seven flavors. Successful sales dictate successful flavors. “Flavors need to make dollars and cents,” said Keith. “While Dad taught us the how of nutrition, you just can’t take a scientific approach, it has to taste good.” The Keith’s recently launched, Perfect Snacks, Perfect Bites and Perfect Kids because “happy kids start with happy bellies.” The family has no intention of slowing down. “We’re invigorated by emails that say our bars helped patients get through chemotherapy because of how easy it is to eat (soft, cookie-dough texture) and digest,” said Keith. “We’ve even had doctors write prescriptions for Perfect Bar.” Keith describes his family’s success as emblematic of the “American dream.” “Thank God for America and the ability to do what we’ve done,” he concluded. “Dad has since passed, but his spirit lives on in our bars. The Perfect Bar story is a story of triumph over tragedy.” Perfect Bar Find your Perfect Bar locally at Sprouts, Vons, Ralphs, Gelson’s, Target, CVS, and 7-Eleven stores throughout the area. For more information, visit Perfectbar.com.
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    Rose Creek needs more friends and volunteers; advocates want waterway made into open-space park
    by DAVE SCHWAB
    Feb 17, 2019 | 9403 views | 3 3 comments | 6 6 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Rose Creek has become a dumping ground for trash, as well as a haven for homeless encampments. / Photo by Dave Schwab
    Rose Creek has become a dumping ground for trash, as well as a haven for homeless encampments. / Photo by Dave Schwab
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    Rose Creek is a San Diego urban stream draining into Mission Bay, which flows north-south through Rose Canyon and San Clemente Canyon and their tributary canyons. / Photo by Dave Schwab
    Rose Creek is a San Diego urban stream draining into Mission Bay, which flows north-south through Rose Canyon and San Clemente Canyon and their tributary canyons. / Photo by Dave Schwab
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    Rose Creek isn’t getting the attention it deserves. At least not according to local environmentalists, who insist restoring and maintaining the wetlands environment there is key to preserving the health of Mission Bay.  “Rose Creek is an amazing place to visit, there’s great birds, plants, and all we’re asking is for the city to take great responsibility for the area,” said Karin Zirk, spokesperson for Friends of Rose Creek, a nonprofit whose vision is for lower Rose Creek to be turned it into an open-space park providing recreational and educational opportunities. “Rose Creek is where land meets nature,” pointed out Paula Gandolfo, a PB planner and community activist and gardener. “As we, man, increase in numbers, we’re having a bigger impact on nature. And this is the watershed where it’s happening here in San Diego.” “Rose Creek is a tremendous asset to Mission Bay,” noted Kristen Victor, who is spearheading the drive to turn Pacific Beach into a full-blown EcoDistrict promoting environmental sustainability. “I believe that future opportunities (with Rose Creek) are just flowing.” Rose Creek is a San Diego urban stream draining into Mission Bay, which flows north-south through Rose Canyon and San Clemente Canyon and their tributary canyons. The Rose Creek watershed comprises about 36 square miles. Rose Creek, however, was diverted and channelized in the first half of the 20th century. It now enters Mission Bay through an artificial channel. The wetland where the creek historically entered Mission Bay is now known as the Kendall Frost Marsh, and is studied and managed by UC San Diego. The Rose Creek Watershed Alliance was created in 2005 to create a plan to improve the watershed. The plan was accepted by the City of San Diego in 2008.  Friends of Rose Creek conducts periodic cleanups in the waterway. The city has applied for a permit to clear vegetation from the lower creek channel, in an effort to prevent flooding. Friends of Rose Creek has a “game plan” for restoring the luster of Rose Creek that includes: - Maintaining and enhancing the existing linear natural park along Rose Creek between Rose Canyon and Marian Bear Open Space Parks in the north and Mission Bay Park in the south. - Connecting the entire Rose Creek Watershed into one City administrative unit in order to manage the area in the way nature functions. - Finding the best and safest ways to link Rose Creek waterway with the new trolley stop to be constructed at Balboa Avenue nearby, by improving freeway crossings in the area making them safer for bicyclists, pedestrians and wildlife. - Eventual creation of a wetlands interpretive and research center in partnership with UC San Diego. - Aiding county, state and federal funding sources that are paying for habitat restoration and passive recreational amenities, along with stormwater projects including water-quality improvements. On a recent tour of a section of Rose Creek in Pacific Beach, Zirk, Gandolfo and Victor walked the cluttered and clogged waterway, whose problems are self-evident. The waterway is a dumping ground for trash, as well as a haven for homeless encampments. “There’s trash, lots of it, including car batteries,” noted Gandolfo during the tour. “[Friends of Rose Creek] do two big cleanups a year with I love a Clean San Diego,” said Zirk. “During the past 15 years, our average haul has been four tons of trash a year. Some years, we might pull in six tons.” Zirk addressed a different problem with the creek. “The whole area is full of invasive plant species, which constrict the waterway and prevents the water from flowing,” she said. Gandolfo noted the waterway is increasingly popular for people. “With an increase in the volume (of people) comes an increase in the waste,” she said. “And an increase in waste includes biological waste, e coli bacteria (from human waste), which ends up in this waterway and eventually, out in the ocean.” “So far, the city has tried to say they’re not responsible for this trash in Rose Creek,” said Zirk, adding there are presently only two trash cans serviced solely by volunteers for people to dispose of their trash along the waterway’s PB section. “It needs to be more accessible,” said Victor of what has to be done to improve Rose Creek, especially given that the new trolley station will undoubtedly increase the volume of both motorized and non-motorized traffic in the area. “It’s been in the PB Community Plan since the early ’90s that Rose Creek should be parkland,” contends Zirk. “The city is saying the reason why it can’t be parkland is because it’s in the Stormwater and Transportation Department. But that department doesn’t engage with the community, whereas parks and rec would engage with the community.” In the final analysis, Zirk said the creek, and volunteers working to preserve it, need help. “Won’t you join us?” she asked.
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    rshimizu20
    |
    February 18, 2019
    They should make some people that are arrested in that area do community service and clean up that area.
    Buffalo Barnes
    |
    February 18, 2019
    North of the Garnet Ave. bridge, pictured above, is a "no man's land" of trash, hobo jungles, trash, stolen bikes and scooters, etc. dumped in the creek. Not to mention crazed and smacked out people circling the drain of addiction. Just walking through the underpass can be a sketchy situation. I live about 50 yards down from the bridge and watch the ebb and flow of homeless and residents of the area and walk my dog along the Homeless Highway (bike path) picking up trash and all manner of discarded flotsam and jetsam of the wandering lost souls.
    beets 42
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    February 18, 2019
    You may be able to get a grant to restore the creek from CDFW (Calif. Dept. of Fish and Wildlife) to restore it, especially if tied in with the marsh, and more so, if the stream could (especially if it did at one time) support steelhead. They have continuing grants.

    The stream might better support fish if there were a greater flow of water. That would also help move water through Mission Bay. It's been reported in the past that the eastern areas of the Bay don't have enough movement of water.

    Additional water might be obtained by releasing some of the recycled water from the Miramar plant. In the past, a lot of that has gone to waste. If it's pure enough to drink, it should be pure enough for the creek (that might take an act of Congress).
    Pacific Beach couple starting a movement with buckets, grabbers and Instagram
    by DAVE SCHWAB
    Feb 16, 2019 | 4764 views | 1 1 comments | 8 8 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Natalie Sollock (above) and Charley Kausen of Pacific Beach started picking up trash in the community.
    Natalie Sollock (above) and Charley Kausen of Pacific Beach started picking up trash in the community.
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    Charley Kausen and Natalie Sollock of Pacific Beach are voluntarily picking up trash in the community and urging others to follow suit by providing an incentive to “Don’t Trash PB.” For a $15 Venmo mobile pay service “loan,” they’ll provide a branded bucket and hand-controlled extension trash “grabber” for others committing to doing their own community clean-up. “We send the person $5 back each time they send us a picture of their bucket full of garbage via email or post and tag us on Instagram,” Kausen and Sollock said in an email. “If they fill the bucket three times – the bucket, and grabber, are theirs forever. If at any time they don't want to participate, they can return the bucket and grabber and get any remaining deposit back in full.” They said the Venmo deposit is merely a way to ensure people actually use both clean-up tools provided, and not just let them sit in their garages. Discussing the origin of their clean-up project named “Don’t Trash PB,” Sollock said, “Charley was obsessive picking up trash every day on our walk to the beach, picking it up with his hands. Then we wised up and picked up a bucket and grabber.” Soon, the pair were out there showing and doing by personal example. It got attention, and results. “People started shouting at us out of their (car) windows, ‘Hey, what are you guys doing?’” said Kausen, adding others expressed interest in joining once told. “It finally dawned on us that all others needed to get involved was their own bucket and grabber,” said Sollock, adding that, by buying in bulk, they were able to bring the cost for the two pick-up tools down to about $10. “We then flocked to Instagram to help spread the word about it,” she added. The pair said a dozen or more people have taken them up on their bucket-and-grabber offer. And the word is spreading. “We don’t really have a mission statement,” said Sollock. “The whole idea was just to get people actively cleaning up in their own neighborhoods. We just wanted to provide the tools for them to do that.” To get a bucket and grabber, people can reach out to Kausen and Sollock on Instagram @donttrashpb, or email donttrashpb@gmail.com.
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    Buffalo Barnes
    |
    February 17, 2019
    I do the same thing along Rose Creek (aka-The Homeless Highway) and other areas. Banning plastic straws? Ban 'to go' cups and tops too. So MANY of them just dropped along the streets along with empty and likely stolen Amazon boxes and envelopes.
    Mayor proposes new regulations for scooters and bikes
    Feb 15, 2019 | 28231 views | 0 0 comments | 7 7 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Electric scooters near the boardwalk in Mission Beach. Using geofencing technology, operators will be required to slow their devices down to eight miles per hour on the boardwalks in Mission Beach, Pacific Beach and La Jolla beach areas. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    Electric scooters near the boardwalk in Mission Beach. Using geofencing technology, operators will be required to slow their devices down to eight miles per hour on the boardwalks in Mission Beach, Pacific Beach and La Jolla beach areas. / Photo by Thomas Melville
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    On Feb. 14, Mayor Kevin L. Faulconer released a set of proposed regulations for dockless scooters and bicycles to address public safety concerns by slowing the devices down in heavily-trafficked public spaces, establish clear rules of the road to hold operators accountable, and charge an annual fee for each device. The proposed ordinance will be discussed at the City Council’s Feb. 20 Active Transportation and Infrastructure Committee meeting. Faulconer’s proposed regulations cover six primary areas – limiting maximum speed of motorized scooters in designated zones, vehicle staging and parking, rider education, data sharing, fees and legal indemnification for the City of San Diego. The mayor’s proposed regulations include: Permit and fees: Each company wishing to operate within City limits will be issued a six-month permit and will be required to pay $150 per device annually. Operators will only be allowed to amend or renew their permit, including increasing the size of their fleet, during the permit issuance months of January and June. Companies offering an approved equity program can receive a $15 per device reduction in their annual fee. Operators will also be required to pay a “performance bond,” which can be returned in the event they cease operation in San Diego and remove their devices.  Limiting speed: Using geofencing technology, operators will be required to slow their devices down to eight miles per hour in designated high-pedestrian traffic zones around the City, including: - Boardwalks in Mission Beach, Pacific Beach and La Jolla beach areas; - Spanish Landing; - Petco Park; - Balboa Park; - NTC Park; - Mission Bay Park. In two other areas in downtown San Diego, scooters will be required to slow to three miles per hour, with riders being notified they are in a no-ride zone. Those areas are:  - North and South Embarcadero; - Martin Luther King Jr. Promenade. Staging and parking: Operators may stage their devices in groups of up to four, and there must be 40 feet between groups of staged devices. They will also be prohibited from staging in school zones and hospital zones. Additionally, users will be prohibited from ending their rides in some areas, including the beach area boardwalks, the perimeter of Petco Park and the north and south Embarcadero walks in downtown. The City will encourage residents to report misplaced or abandoned bikes and scooters through the “Get It Done” application. Operators will be notified of the reports and will have three hours to remove the devices or face potential impound and associated fees.   City indemnification: Each operator will be required to indemnify the City from liability claims and each will need to hold a liability insurance policy. Rider education: Prior to each use, companies will be required to educate riders of local and state vehicle and traffic codes and the cost of a citation for violating those laws. Each device also will need to be clearly labeled “Riding on Sidewalks is Prohibited” and include operator age requirements. “The City of San Diego is taking a smart approach to dockless mobility,” said Colin Parent, executive director of Circulate San Diego. “San Diego is ensuring access to new transportation choices, while balancing the needs of other users of the public right-of-way.”  Data sharing: The operators will provide the City with detailed monthly reports that will be useful for Climate Action Plan monitoring and mobility planning, including but not limited to: - Deployed Device Data, including fleet size and utilization rates; - Trip information, including start/end points, routes, distances and duration; - Parking information; - Reported incidents and actions taken; - Reported obstructions/hazards and actions taken; - Maintenance activities. “We welcome more mobility options and these new regulations take a common-sense approach that will allow this emerging market to grow in a responsible way,” Faulconer said. “Scooters and e-bikes are providing an opportunity for thousands of people to get around town without a car, creating less traffic and cutting greenhouse gas emissions.” “I am pleased to see the City adopt sensible regulations for dockless scooters and bicycles that prioritizes public safety and embraces the sharing economy,” said City Councilmember Chris Cate. “Resolving this issue has been one of my top priorities, and I am appreciative that my solutions will be implemented.”
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    Do you know what to do if you find a stray kitten?
    by EMILY BLACKWOOD
    Feb 13, 2019 | 15156 views | 0 0 comments | 5 5 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Photo courtesy of the San Diego Humane Society
    Photo courtesy of the San Diego Humane Society
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    Of course, your first instinct is to snuggle them, but that might not be the best idea. With kitten season approaching this spring, the San Diego Human Society wants local residents to be aware of the exact steps to take when you find a stray kitten.

    According to the organization’s Kitten Nursery manager Jakie Noble, nearly 3,000 0- to 8-week-old kittens were turned into the humane society last year. And there are typically two “waves” of kittens; one when the weather starts to warm up in spring and another in the fall.

    With so many kittens being born, there’s a greater chance for people to find them. So while leaving a kitten alone is probably one of the hardest things to do, it is the first step.

    “The most common mistake people make when they find kittens is they panic and remove the kittens from their environment right away,” Noble said, adding that it’s important to first assess the situation. Ask yourself if the kitten is in danger of predators, if it’s injured or if it appears to be cold or hungry.

    “If the kitten(s) are warm and quietly snuggled together, the likelihood is that the mother cat may be close by, waiting for the human to leave her nesting spot,” Noble said. “If you find a kitten alone, this could mean the mother cat is moving her litter to another nesting spot. Mom uses her mouth to pick up and move the kittens, so she can only move one kitten at a time. Be careful not to ‘steal’ a kitten she may be returning to move."

    As much as most people would love to, not everyone has enough time to sit and wait to see if the mother cat comes back. That’s when you can use what Noble calls the “flour trick.”

    “Take a small amount of flour and make a ring around the nest area. Watch from a safe distance to see if mom returns. Come back in a few hours. If you see paw prints in the flour, this is a sure sign that the mother cat is around and tending to her kittens.”

    If the mother cat does not return for her kitten(s), then it’s time to take action. If you have the availability and knowledge to take on the kittens, do so, but if you don’t, bring them to your local shelter so they can be properly evaluated and taken care of. But don’t forget about the mother cat.

    “Every effort should be made to catch/trap the mother cat too,” Noble said. “If an un-spayed cat no longer has kittens, she can immediately go back into heat and have another litter of kittens in just 60 days. The only way to break the cycle of kittens being born is to take responsibility for spaying and neutering outdoor community cats.”

    And if you do decide to take the kitten(s) in — even temporarily — Noble warns that they shouldn't be fed right away. In fact, the priority should be to get the kitten(s) warm before they eat because a cold kitten can’t successfully digest foot.

    When the kitten is warmed up, be sure you feed it the right diet, which is not cow’s milk, human food or cereal. Instead, go to your local pet supply store and buy kitten milk replacer. If you don’t have access to that, it’s important to seek assistance from our local rescue group, vet clinic or animal shelter.

    For more information about kitten care and kitten adoptions, visit sdhumane.org.

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