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    City Council votes against boardwalk ban for motorized scooters
    by DAVE SCHWAB
    May 23, 2018 | 6170 views | 0 0 comments | 6 6 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    A group of friends rides motorized scooters on the boardwalk in Mission Beach. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    A group of friends rides motorized scooters on the boardwalk in Mission Beach. / Photo by Thomas Melville
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    Shock, anger and relief for some was the local reaction to the City Council’s 6-3 vote May 22 against an emergency ordinance prohibiting motorized scooters on coastal boardwalks. District 2 Councilmember Lorie Zapf, who proposed the ordinance, was joined by District 1 Councilmember Barbara Bry and District 5 Councilmember Mark Kersey in supporting a scooter boardwalk ban.  Council members Chris Ward, Myrtle Cole, Scott Sherman, Chris Cate, David Alvarez and Georgette Gomez all turned thumbs down on the proposal. They argued either that they weren’t convinced of its necessity, or they felt the issue hadn’t yet been properly vetted. Sherman from District 7 said the problem was more about irresponsible people riding, than about the vehicles being ridden. “I am disappointed that my colleagues failed to realize the tremendous public safety problem electric scooters present on the boardwalk,” said Zapf. “I intend to continue working with the police department, the lifeguard service and community leaders to refine the proposal so that it can gather majority support on the council.” “We won’t be weighing in on the topic,” said San Diego Fire-Rescue spokesperson Monica Munoz. “We enforce the muni codes and other laws when they are enacted.” Asked if the boardwalk is considered a sidewalk, San Diego Police Department spokesperson Lt. Brent Williams, answered: “Some parts are sidewalks and already prohibited. Some parts are a Class 1 bike way. That’s what the item at City Council was about.” Of helmets, Williams said: “They are required for any rider who uses a scooter, age is not a factor. It is enforced and a number of citations have been written for this specific violation citywide.” Concerning enforcement of the 8 mph speed limit on the boardwalk, Williams said: “Scooters do go faster than 8 mph, and 8 mph is the posted limit. Enforcement of this is also done on the boardwalk, and will continue to be enforced by SDPD.” There was considerable agreement from Zapf’s constituency in Mission and Pacific beaches and Mission Bay, that motorized scooters on the boardwalk are a safety threat that needs to be addressed. “I was disgusted,” said Scott Chipman, a 43-year PB resident. “The presentation on safety issues could not have been more convincing showing case after case of dangerous conditions on the boardwalk … Multiple videos of scooter crashes causing injuries were shown. The two City Council members who have beach boardwalks in their districts pleadings were ignored. The recommendations of police and life guard chief were ignored.” Concurred Marcie Beckett, of PB, “Shame on City Council. The bay walk used to be a safe place for families to bring their little kids to ride bikes or roller skate. But not anymore due to the advent of motorized scooters zooming along without the skill or time to react to the unpredictable little ones. The City gets no revenue from the motorized scooter rentals, not even sales tax, but the taxpayers are on the hook for the cost of police enforcement, emergency response and negligence lawsuits from people who will be injured due to the reckless decision made today by City Council.” Citing numerous complaints from his staff and hotel guests, Bill Allen, Crystal Pier Hotel chairman, said: “They are left daily in our hotel driveway locked, blocking our gate access. Guests as well as those walking along the boardwalk now have to dodge riders of these in congested times… The council members who voted against this proposed ban do not represent any coastal areas and, most likely, have not walked on the boardwalk lately.” A counter perspective was offered by Circulate San Diego, a regional nonprofit promoting public and non-motorized travel. “Since the introduction of dockless bike and scooter share earlier this year, San Diegans have begun to use active transportation more than ever before,” said Maya Rosas, the group’s policy director. “Circulate San Diego supports the use of dockless bike and scooter share as a form of transportation and spoke at City Council in opposition to the proposed ban. San Diego has embraced this innovative and green technology. A vote to ban scooters in our iconic boardwalks would have been a step in the wrong direction on the City’s road to get more people walking, biking, scooting, and taking transit.” Said longtime PB community Planner Chris Olson: “Our leaders should support and promote alternative methods of transportation and find safe and effective methods to employ them. This emergency ordinance is a knee-jerk reaction to an important public safety issue, and it is the wrong approach. Yes, some people recklessly speed on scooters, skateboards, bikes, etc. But a blanket ban of motorized scooters on one section of the boardwalk is not a rational solution.” Added Olson: “This ordinance targets a method of transportation rather than the true issue, which is speed. Will they ban electric bikes next? Every time I see people on these scooters they exude gleeful revelation. Don’t take that away.”
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    Voice of La Jolla: Omar Passons, Theresa Kim and Aja Lee
    by RON JONES
    May 20, 2018 | 8577 views | 0 0 comments | 0 0 recommendations | email to a friend | print
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    Nature therapy: Best day hikes throughout San Diego
    by BLAKE BUNCH
    May 18, 2018 | 6904 views | 0 0 comments | 10 10 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Two hikers stop at the top of the Ho Chi Minh trail leading to Black’s Beach on Tuesday, May 15. BLAKE BUNCH/VILLAGE NEWS
    Two hikers stop at the top of the Ho Chi Minh trail leading to Black’s Beach on Tuesday, May 15. BLAKE BUNCH/VILLAGE NEWS
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    Cedar Creek Falls, located in Ramona, had plenty of water flowing this April. JENNI COOK/VILLAGE NEWS
    Cedar Creek Falls, located in Ramona, had plenty of water flowing this April. JENNI COOK/VILLAGE NEWS
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    The trail leading to Cedar Creek Falls on a stormy March day, BLAKE BUNCH/VILLAGE NEWS
    The trail leading to Cedar Creek Falls on a stormy March day, BLAKE BUNCH/VILLAGE NEWS
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    Depending on rainfall, there is a stream that runs through the Santa Ysabel Open Space Parcel. BLAKE BUNCH/VILLAGE NEWS
    Depending on rainfall, there is a stream that runs through the Santa Ysabel Open Space Parcel. BLAKE BUNCH/VILLAGE NEWS
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    Although La Jolla has been clouded by the “May gray” marine layer in recent mornings, by midday the sun is out in full effect. While it may seem counter-intuitive to head inland to escape the heat, at the right time of day, the combination of fresh water and elevation breezes can spell utter relief. Possessing two of San Diego’s most frequented trails, the Ho Chi Minh and Broken Hill trails (although Broken Hill is undergoing construction), La Jollans take great pride in ownership of these astounding coastal views. With spring coming to a close, and summer right around the corner, the La Jolla Village News has provided a guide to some of the best day hikes in or near San Diego. While some of these entail a decent amount of driving, but at the end of the day, one’s satisfaction after completing these hikes can be worth much more than time or money. ‘Ho Chi Minh’ trail to Black’s Beach (1 mile) It may be seen as a right-of-passage at some point during any La Jollan’s life, Ho Chi Minh is arguably one of the more popular trails in San Diego. There is no fee to enter the trail, but it can be a bit difficult to find. Turn on to La Jolla Farms Road, continue for nearly a mile until cars/hikers/surfers begin to appear. There is a break in a wrought iron-and-wooden fence, with a falling rock sign, that opens up into a trail. Simply follow the trail passed razor ferns, across a makeshift bridge and scurry down the rope to hit the beach. If not comfortable climbing down the winding trail, it is advised to take one of the main fire roads prior to the trailhead, down to the beach. Torrey Pines State Natural Reserve trails Perhaps some of the most idyllic coastal vistas in California, the trails at Torrey Pines can be ideal for a day out with the family, a quick run to get the blood flowing, or for photographers to grab the perfect sunset shot. “A natural reserve status is assigned to an area of importance, and typically is one that contains threatened plants, animals, habitats, or unique geological formations,” the trail website reads, so be mindful of this area’s protected status. Unfortunately, two of the most popular trails, Broken Hill and North Fork trails, are closed for the next few months. Located at 12600 N Torrey Pines Road, and encompassing 3.1-square-miles, it should be noted that this location is a reserve and not a park. For more information, call 858-755-2063. Cedar Creek Falls Trail (5.2 miles) Located in Cleveland National Forest, east of Escondido, this titular highlight of this hike is the falls themselves, a perfect way to cool off during a hot day. Be forewarned, however, water levels at the falls vary substantially throughout the year. The falls typically do not run during the summer months when the pool at the base of the falls is stagnant and filled with algae. It is recommended to have at least a gallon of water for each person for this moderate hike. For more information, visit the station at the trailhead, located at 15519 Thornbush Road in Ramona, or call 760-788-0250. Also, it is necessary to purchase a permit at recreation.gov/permits ahead of time. Los Penasquitos Canyon Trail (6.8 miles) Los Peñasquitos Canyon Preserve is an urban park stretching approximately seven miles. The park encompasses some 4,000 acres of both Peñasquitos and Lopez canyons and is one of the largest urban parks in the United States.  Offering an adventurous hike (but relatively easy), cool streams and smaller series of waterfalls, Los Penasquitos Canyon trail can often be rather crowded, so it is advised to go early in the morning or late afternoon to avoid crowds. Located at 12020 Black Mountain Road. The park closes at 7 p.m. daily. For more information, call 619-525-8213. This is a great hike for families, Three Sisters Falls Trail (4.5 miles) “Three Sisters” is a true San Diego gem, but is not to be trifled with – especially during the warmer months. It is an oft-too-frequent occurrence that people underestimate the gradient of this hike (not for beginners), as well as the loose sand that comprises it. If you’re lucky enough to get out on the trail after a heavy rain, however, it will make trudging through the heat all the more worth it. It should also be noted that this out-and-back trail has an elevation gain of 1,036 feet, which can make hiking back out a bit tiresome. Trailhead located at 14850 Boulder Creek Road in Julian. For more information, visit fs.usda.gov/recarea/cleveland. Mission Trails Regional Park Mission Trails Regional Park truly offers something for every level of hiker. From hanging out by the Old Mission Dam (not in protected areas), to trying out actual rock climbing, to quick, steep elevation, jumps, or just biking around, the park draws a vast array of sportsmen. Some favored trails are Cowles Mountain (the highest point in San Diego), Pyles Peak, Kwaay Paay Peak, South Fortuna Mountain and North Fortuna Mountains (both take several hours). From these peaks and mountainous trails, one is provided with a view of San Diego unlike any other. For more information, visit mtrp@mtrp.org, or call 619-668-3277. Located at 1 Father Junipero Serra Trail. Iron Mountain Trail (5.2 miles) Within close proximity to the popular Mt. Woodson (Potato Chip Rock) Trail, Iron Mountain offers a less-congested alternative to waiting in line to take an optical illusion photo. While the trail area is well-manicured, during peak hours there is little shade, so be sure to wear plenty of sunblock. With an elevation gain of 1,102 feet, Iron Mountain is one of the highest peaks in Poway. Apparently, on clear days, hikers can catch a glimpse of Catalina Island from the summit. Trailhead located at 14847-14909 CA-67. For more information, visit alltrails.com/trail/us/california/iron-mountain-trail—5. Santa Ysabel Open Space Preserve Actually two separate land parcels, Santa Ysabel East and West preserves allow for the introspective hiker to nearly fully escape into nature. With several shaded picnic areas off the trail, it is quite easy to get caught up in a 2.5-hour-long lunch. Although this land is still in use by cattle ranchers (they can often be found napping in/along the trail), it simply provides another facet to make it that much more of a “California” hike. Located at 29759 Old Julian Highway in Ramona.
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    La Jolla news and community briefs
    May 04, 2018 | 38405 views | 0 0 comments | 13 13 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    A rock-tumbling water wall surges into La Jolla Cove. DON BALCH/VILLAGE NEWS
    A rock-tumbling water wall surges into La Jolla Cove. DON BALCH/VILLAGE NEWS
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    Birch Aquarium’s ‘Oddities: Hidden Heroes of the Scripps Collections’ Oddities is created in partnership with the team from the Scripps Oceanographic Collections, where millions of specimens allow scientists to understand some of the amazing adaptations marine creatures have developed to survive. From super vision and invisibility to protective armor and the ability to create electricity to zap prey, real marine creatures do amazing things every day that stretch even the wildest imagination. The interactive exhibit will include examples of some of the unique creatures from all depths and highlight how they have inspired everything from cinema and pop culture to medicine and engineering. Guests will learn what it takes to collect scientific samples and have the opportunity to test out some of these unique adaptations through creature cosplay. Oddities opens June 29 and will be on display through Spring 2019. The exhibit replaces the Mexican Seas and Feeling the Heat exhibits. Oddities is included in aquarium admission, which is $18.50 for adults and $14 for children. Annual memberships are also available. Visit aquarium.ucsd.edu for more. Teen leaders host activism conference on May 6 Drawing inspiration from waves of student-led activism and protests across the nation, Jewish Family Service of San Diego (JFS) will host a free event designed to encourage local youths to take action through lobbying and advocacy. Your Voice: An Activism Conference for Teens Who Want to Change the World, will take place on Sunday, May 6 from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Farmer and the Seahorse in La Jolla. Teens of all backgrounds and faiths are invited to learn about the process of lobbying and engage with issues related to education, environment and climate change, gender equality, and hunger and food insecurity. Keynote speakers Rep. Susan A. Davis and council president pro- tem Barbara Bry, will talk to teens about the challenges of growing up in today’s world and explain how young people can use their voices to make a difference. The day’s activities will include mentor-led mock-lobbying sessions, hands-on service projects and networking opportunities. Attendees will also have the chance to speak with representatives for Rep. Scott Peters, assemblymembers Lorena Gonzalez Fletcher and Shirley Weber, as well as Councilmember Myrtle Cole. Food & Wine Festival, Kentucky Derby celebration Get your seersucker suits and big hats ready. On Saturday, May 5, the Junior League of San Diego will welcome 1,200 guests to its 18th annual Food & Wine Festival, taking place from noon until 5 p.m. at Ellen Scripps Browning Park above the picturesque La Jolla Cove. This must-attend annual event offers attendees the ultimate culinary experience with tastes and sips from local restaurant and beverage purveyors, as well as live music and a festival party with a televised viewing of the 144th Kentucky Derby. The festival experience will feature more than 50 of San Diego’s finest vendors, including We Olive, Viewpoint Brewing, Truluck's Seafood, The Oceanaire Seafood Room, Quady Winery, True Food Kitchen, Fallbrook Winery, Farmer & the Seahorse, La Valencia, and many more. San Diego Cetacean Society educational event On May 9, at p.m. The San Diego Chapter of the American Cetacean Society is pleased to have Tom Norris, founder, resident, and chief scientist of Bio-Waves, Inc., present on “Acoustic Methods for Research and Monitoring of Cetaceans.” Norris will talk about some of the passive acoustic methods and technologies that his company has developed and uses to research, monitor, and conduct mitigation of human activities on marine mammals. The presentation will be held at Sumner Auditorium at Scripps Institution of Oceanography,  8595 La Jolla Shores Drive. La Jolla Solar Experience Join your community forum for a powerful Q&A with nationally certified energy practitioners and nonprofit experts. Learn the latest technologies, how solar works, if solar will work for your home, battery storage and integration, available state and federal incentives and much more. Held May 5 from 11 a.m. to noon. at the La Jolla Community Center, 6811 La Jolla Blvd. Complimentary lunch provided. Learn how solar works If solar will work for your home’s latest technologies, battery integration with solar, how much solar and batteries cost financing options available incentives and how to choose a solar provider seminar. Following the seminar, join in for a solar home tour and check out a system and battery up close. An address will be sent to seminar RSVPs prior to the event via email. Learn more and RSVP at sdsolarexperience.org
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    La Jolla news and community briefs
    Apr 22, 2018 | 34016 views | 0 0 comments | 18 18 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    A bodyboarder squeezes into a mini barrel as his friend films near Marine St. on April 20. BLAKE BUNCH/VILLAGE NEWS
    A bodyboarder squeezes into a mini barrel as his friend films near Marine St. on April 20. BLAKE BUNCH/VILLAGE NEWS
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    UC San Diego study: Anyone Can Be an Innovator Students given incentives to innovate are just as skilled as the self-motivated, research finds. What are the traits of an innovator? Is it an inherent or learned quality? Existing theories and empirical research on how innovation occurs largely assume that it is an ingrained quality of the individual and that only people with this innate ability seek and attain jobs that require it; however recent research from the University of California San Diego’s School of Global Policy and Strategy shows this isn’t the case. Economist Joshua S. Graff Zivin and professor of management Elizabeth Lyons tested these previously held notions by creating a contest for UC San Diego’s engineering and computer science students. The competition, outlined in their National Bureau of Economic Research working paper, was designed to answer the question: Are persuaded innovators less capable than those who naturally gravitate to innovative activities? The mobile application contest was advertised through various medium on campus and attracted around 100 students. In order to differentiate between self-selected innovators and “induced” innovators, a random subset of eligible students who did not sign up by the contest deadline were offered a monetary incentive of $100 to participate. In total, 190 students signed up. Submissions between the two groups were evaluated by technology industry participants who acted as judges for the contest and who had no knowledge of which group the proposals came from. The judges evaluated each application across four categories; functionality, user-friendliness, novelty and potential commercial value. Though induced participants were less likely to be drawn from majors that provide the most relevant skills for the competition, such as electrical engineering and computer science, and had lower cumulative GPAs, their success was statistically indistinguishable from those that were innately drawn to the competition. Whether innovators can be created, and how they fare relative to those who self-select into innovative activities, also has important implications for public and private policy, according to the authors. “If individuals are being held back by accurate beliefs about their ability to perform, as our results suggest, then efforts to help individuals overcome the psychological barriers that inhibit their participation could potentially enhance innovative output across a wide range of settings,” said Graff Zivin. “This shows that psychological barriers, if overcome, could meaningfully contribute to the innovation process.” Contest entries were scored from 1-5 on each category for a total score maximum of 20. The developers of the top three applications were awarded prize money. “We selected students at UC San Diego’s Jacobs School of Engineering since these students have technical capabilities to produce impactful inventions,” Lyons said. “In addition, engineers are frequently the targets of interventions to increase innovative activity.” To further explore the psychological factors of innovation, the researchers randomly offered encouragement to subsets of both the induced and self-selected contest participants in order to examine the importance of confidence-building interventions on each sample. While encouragement had no impact on performance on average and was not differentially important for the induced sample, the authors did find surprising results based on student GPA. Students with above-median GPAs performed significantly worse when they received additional encouragement, whereas students with below- median GPAs performed significantly better when they received additional encouragement. “More work is needed to understand the precise mechanisms that explain the effects of encouragement, but they introduce a small nuance to our conclusions,” said Lyons, whose current research projects include using data to analyze firm hiring and organization. “While our work clearly suggests that innovators can be created through inducement subsidies, whether they will also benefit from the confidence-building encouragement of the sort that is standard management practice in many firms may well depend on both their technical capabilities and intrinsic motivation to succeed.” Debby Buchholz Appointed Managing Director of La Jolla Playhouse The Board of Trustees of La Jolla Playhouse announced today the appointment of Debby Buchholz as the Playhouse’s new managing director. Buchholz has served as the Playhouse’s General Manager since 2002 and will begin her duties in this new role on May 1. “Debby Buchholz’s integrity, professionalism and visionary leadership in the field are unmatched. Her deep institutional knowledge, along with her passionate support for our artistic mission, makes her the ideal partner for artistic director Christopher Ashley,” said La Jolla Playhouse Board Chair Lynelle Lynch. “The Board looks forward to celebrating this new leadership team that will continue to strengthen La Jolla Playhouse’s place at the forefront of the American theatre landscape.” “Debby’s extraordinary leadership – both locally in the San Diego community and nationally through her work with LORT, the largest professional theatre association in the country – are an invaluable asset to the organization. For the past ten years, I have witnessed Debby’s incredible dedication to the Playhouse, as well as her unflagging enthusiasm for the work we do on stage and off, and I couldn’t be more pleased to partner with her in this new role,” noted Ashley. In partnership with the Artistic Director, the managing director is responsible for directing overall strategic planning, financial management, marketing, development, production management and labor relations for the organization." San Diego Center for Jewish Culture hosts political commentator Sally Kohn The San Diego Center for Jewish Culture (SDCJC) has announced it is hosting popular political commentator Sally Kohn for a one-night, non-denominational, secular speaking event at the Lawrence Family Jewish Community Center (JCC) Jacobs Family Campus in La Jolla on May 3 from 7 to 8 p.m.  The event is appropriately titled "Community Divided, Humanity United," a message Kohn advocates in her soon-to-be-released book “The Opposite of Hate: A Field Guide to Repairing Our Humanity." The event is generously funded by the County of San Diego’s Community Enhancement program. "We are thrilled to be partnering with Sally for this poignant night focused entirely on unification, a sentiment the San Diego Center for Jewish Culture advocates strongly in everything we do,” said Brian Garrick, JCC’s cultural arts programs director. “The goal is to bring together diverse, and often marginalized, groups for an honest conversation about the ‘epidemic of incivility’ as well as real-world solutions to curb hate. Sally’s message of compassion and kindness is something that everyone needs to hear.”  A political commentator and columnist for CNN and previously a contributor to Fox News, Kohn is known for her ability to make friends across the political aisle. Hyatt Regency La Jolla at Aventine to host 27th annual Mama’s Day tasting extravaganza The 27th annual Mama’s Day, benefiting Mama’s Kitchen, is scheduled for Friday, May 11 from 6:30 to 9:30 p.m. at the Hyatt Regency La Jolla at Aventine located at 3777 La Jolla Village Drive. The fundraising event, held the Friday evening before Mother’s Day features more than 50 chefs offering distinctive tastes ranging from San Diego’s finest restaurants to our city’s top-of-the-line hotels and catering companies who graciously prepare delicious samples for nearly 600 attendees. Mama’s Day is often touted as the original San Diego tasting event and helps to raise critical funds for Mama's Kitchen's mission to deliver three hot, nutritional meals a day, seven days a week and free of charge to local women, men and children vulnerable to hunger due to HIV, cancer or other critical illnesses. Last year, Mama’s Day raised $178,900, which provided 56,794 home-delivered meals to Mama’s Kitchen’s clients. This year, the event aims to raise $215,000 which will provide 73,000 meals to San Diego’s critically ill neighbors. Guests will enjoy food, live music from Bonnie Foster Productions, and fun throughout the evening while dining on distinctive dishes graciously prepared and served by executive chefs from the region’s top restaurants. At this San Diego tasting event, guests are also encouraged to bid on an extensive silent auction or purchase a chance to win fabulous prizes in an opportunity drawing to help raise critical funds for those most vulnerable to hunger in San Diego County. Presented by Nordstrom and hosted by Sycuan, Mama’s Day pre-sale tickets are available for just $150 per person and $175 at the door. Premium VIP tickets are available for $250 each and include early access at 5:30 p.m. to an exclusive VIP dining area and pre-party featuring a private cooking presentation by this year’s culinary host and longtime Mama’s Kitchen supporter, Emmy award-winning chef and author, Sam “The Cooking Guy” Zien, as well as a performance from the San Diego Gay Men’s Chorus. VIP guests will also enjoy a full hosted bar for two hours. Tickets may be purchased online at mamaskitchen.org. Sponsorships are available, and there are opportunities for chefs and restaurants to participate. For more information, contact Geraldine Zamora at 619-233-6262 or geraldine@mamaskitchen.org. Rotary’s Quintessential Craft Beer & Wine Festival on April 28 to benefit multiple charities San Diegans are invited to attend La Jolla Golden Triangle Rotary’s 5th Annual Quintessential Craft Beer & Wine Festival on Saturday, April 28 from 1 to 5 p.m. at the Nobel Athletic Fields on 8810 Judicial Drive near Interstate 805. This dog-friendly event features access and unlimited samples from more than 30 local and regional breweries, distilleries, and wineries as well as other local vendors. This year, the breweries include Abnormal Beer Co, Ballast Point, Karl Strauss, Kilowatt, Second Chance, and many more. Be sure to also check out Malahat Spirits & Blinking Owl Distillery. Tickets cost $30 in advance, $40 at the door and $15 for active duty military. One hundred percent of the proceeds benefit 45 local and international humanitarian projects stewarded by nearly 100 members of the La Jolla Golden Triangle Rotary Club. Among the many beneficiaries of funds raised by the La Jolla Golden Triangle Rotary Quintessential Festival are The Preuss School UCSD, VA Hospital, Ronald McDonald House and projects benefitting local active military and their families. International efforts include the Rotary Jalalabad School in Afghanistan, and humanitarian projects in India, Africa, Israel and recently, the provision of blankets for refugees arriving under emergency conditions in Macedonia. For more information, visit lajollagtrotary.org. ‘Breakpoint’ authors to speak at DG Wills Books Eminent ecologist Jeremy B.C. Jackson and award-winning journalist Steve Chapple will discuss their timely new book “Breakpoint: Reckoning with America’s Environmental Crises” on Sunday, May 6 at 2 p.m. at D.G.Wills Books, located at 7461 Girard Ave. “Breakpoint” provides an insightful look at the American environmental crisis and emerging solutions from the heartland to the coasts in the era of global climate change. Jeremy B. C. Jackson and Steve Chapple traveled the length of the Mississippi River interviewing farmers, fishermen, scientists, and policymakers to better understand the mounting environmental problems ravaging the United States. Along their journey, which quickly expands to California, Florida, and New York, the pair uncovered surprising and profound connections between ecological systems and environmental crises across the country. Artfully weaving together independent research and engaging storytelling, Jackson and Chapple examine the looming threats from recent hurricanes and fires, industrial agriculture, river mismanagement, extreme weather events, drought, and rising sea levels that are pushing the country toward the breaking point of ecological and economic collapse. Yet, despite these challenges, the authors provide optimistic and practical solutions for addressing these multidimensional issues to achieve greater environmental stability, human well-being, and future economic prosperity. With a passionate call to action, they look hopefully toward emerging and achievable solutions to preserve the country’s future. “Moving, poignant, and timely, ‘Breakpoint’ is both a stark reminder of the urgent environmental challenges facing the planet and a hopeful call to action to those in power. This is boots-on-the-ground science at its finest," said actor and environmentalist Leonardo DiCaprio. “‘Breakpoint’ is a stunning book of ecological anthropology from consummate storytellers. The human narratives they bring to light allow us to understand and appreciate how America farmed, drilled, degraded, and overheated the land of the free and the home of the brave. It is fair, compelling, and heartbreaking, as good as anything written by Margaret Mead or Claude Levi Strauss,” said Paul Hawken, author of “Drawdown: The Most Comprehensive Plan Ever Proposed to Reverse Global Warming.” Jeremy B. C. Jackson is an emeritus professor at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography and senior scientist emeritus at the Smithsonian Institution. Steve Chapple is an award-winning author and writer of the national newspaper column “Intellectual Capital.” His previous books include “Kayaking the Full Moon” and “Let the Mountains Talk, Let the Rivers Run.” For more information, visit dgwillsbooks.com.
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    News
    Belmont Park to offer $5 deals after 5 p.m.
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    New spa brings traditional Thai massage therapy to Pacific Beach
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    Charlie Mossy, Bishop’s lacrosse defender and football lineman
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    Published - Sunday, May 06
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    Nikita Nair, inspired by childhood movie, becomes La Jolla Country Day School fencing ace
    Nikita Nair, a fencer for La Jolla Country Day School, didn’t really want to be a princess. But she did become interested in sword-fighting because of the movie “Princess Bride.” “I’ve always been ...
    Published - Saturday, May 05
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    Wayfarer Bread & Pastry to open in Bird Rock this summer
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    Published - Saturday, May 05
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    La Jolla Parks and Beaches revisit what do with dockless bikes: Branded bike racks?
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    Published - Saturday, May 05
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    After 33 years as SD staple, Saffron Thai finally arrives in La Jolla
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    Learn to make free libraries, pancakes, and Spam musubi at How-to Festival in Pacific Beach
    Those looking to do creative things, like fashioning their own Little Free Library, should attend the How-To Festival from 11 to 3 p.m. Saturday, May 26 at Pacific Beach Library, 4275 Cass St. Sche...
    Published - Friday, May 04
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    Education Notebook: Friends of Pacific Beach Secondary Schools Auction and Fundraiser on May 18
    Friends of Pacific Beach Secondary Schools - Friends of Pacific Beach Secondary Schools Auction and Fundraiser will take place 5 to 10 p.m. Friday, May 18 at the Soledad Club. It will be an evening...
    Published - Friday, May 04
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    Mayor allocates funding for fighting flies in Mission Beach
    Mayor Kevin Faulconer has allocated $70,000 in this year’s city budget to stop a continuing fly problem in Mission Beach. Trash in the beach area causes thousands of flies to swarm, pestering touri...
    Published - Thursday, May 03
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    Jazz Jedi Council to perform ‘May the Forth Be With You’ at Dizzy’s
    “Star Wars” fans won’t want to miss a special show, “May the Forth Be With You,” taking place at Dizzy’s on May 4. Presented by violinist Jamie Shadowlight, the night will feature music from the “S...
    Published - Thursday, May 03
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    Current Issues(Archives)
    The Peninsula Beacon, May 24th, 2018
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    The Peninsula Beacon, May 24th, 2018
    La Jolla Village News, May 18th, 2018
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    La Jolla Village News, May 18th, 2018
    Beach & Bay Press, May 17th, 2018
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    Beach & Bay Press, May 17th, 2018
    The Peninsula Beacon, May 10th, 2018
    download The Peninsula Beacon, May 10th, 2018
    The Peninsula Beacon, May 10th, 2018