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    Wild, wilder and wildest plans for wetlands in Mission Bay – ReWild’s proposal restores marshland habitat
    by DAVE SCHWAB
    Jan 23, 2019 | 1948 views | 0 0 comments | 2 2 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    A cattle egret finds a meal in Mission Bay. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    A cattle egret finds a meal in Mission Bay. / Photo by Thomas Melville
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    Mission Bay is a microcosm of the worldwide battle being waged to save remaining dwindling wetlands. That battle is being played out locally with ReWild Mission Bay, a project of San Diego Audubon and its partners to enhance and restore wetlands in Mission Bay’s northeast corner. ReWild Mission Bay’s proposal is to enhance and restore more than 150 acres of wetlands in the northeast corner of Mission Bay, including the enhancement of 40 acres of existing tidal wetland habitat. The project will also create approximately 100 acres of tidal marsh and mudflat habitat and 30 acres of transitional/upland habitat. The timeline for the high-profile project calls for it to be considered by the City Council sometime this year. The project would also ultimately have to be approved by the California Coastal Commission. Mission Bay’s wetlands supply habitat for hundreds of local wildlife species, protect San Diego from climate change impacts such as flooding, and improves area water quality. “What we have here is an opportunity, by doing a large-scale, meaningful wetlands project, to correct the imbalance that has long favored commerce and recreation at the expense of the environment,” said ReWild project manager Rebecca Schwartz Lesberg. “During the past century, Mission Bay has been converted from a rich natural treasure into a heavily developed recreational area,” said Julia Elkin with the California State Coastal Conservancy. “People have lost the opportunity to really experience nature along the shoreline in Mission Bay. This is an unprecedented opportunity to restore a small piece of what was lost.”  “We are excited to work with the City and all of our partners to see this vision implemented,” said Chris Redfern, executive director of San Diego Audubon, about ReWild. “This is the only way to protect the bay’s few remnant wetlands, which provide crucial habitat for wildlife, from disappearing in the coming years due to sea level rise.”  Noting society views climate change as “complicated and far away,” Schwartz Lesberg pointed out Mission Bay’s remaining wetlands is “really close on our coastline and something we can do something about.” Audubon and allies have presented three alternative proposals – wild, wilder and wildest – for Mission Bay wild lands restoration. “Wild” would provide the lowest amount of wetlands habitat, exclusively within the areas of Campland on the Bay and De Anza Cove.  “Wilder” uses soil excavated from Campland to shallow approximately 38 acres of open water to create mudflat and salt marsh providing greater resiliency to sea-level rise.  “Wildest” proposes using soil from both Campland and De Anza Point to restore mudflat and salt marsh providing the greatest resiliency to sea-level rise of all three alternatives. ReWild recently released its highly anticipated final conceptual plans in a 350-page Feasibility Study Report outlining how wetlands can be restored to protect wildlife and the communities. The three plan options presented include expanded public access and habitat restoration options, as well as cost estimates and sea level-rise modeling.  Mission Bay’s habitat has changed drastically over time. In the late 1800s, Mission Bay was a 4,000-acre mosaic of wetland habitats sprawled across the mouth of the San Diego River.  For millennia, this wetland complex supported Native American communities relying on the Bay’s natural resources, and was home to tens of thousands of migratory waterfowl and shorebirds.  However, during the past several decades, much of the natural resources of Mission Bay have been altered, beginning with “Derby’s Dike,” built in 1853, to re-route the San Diego River. That began 150 years of large-scale alteration of the bay that nearly obliterated its natural biodiversity.  Of the 4,000-acres of wetland habitats that once existed, only 40 acres – 1 percent – remain.  ReWild conceptual plans for wetlands restoration, and all of the analysis that went into them, were presented to the public during a December workshop at Mission Bay High School. For more information on ReWild Mission Bay and to access the full report, visit rewildmissionbay.org.
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    What to expect in 2019? We asked local psychics for predictions
    Jan 23, 2019 | 2832 views | 0 0 comments | 4 4 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Dr. Alexandra Andrews of the nonprofit Alexandra Institute and bookstore at 3545 Midway Drive, Suite G, in Point Loma.
    Dr. Alexandra Andrews of the nonprofit Alexandra Institute and bookstore at 3545 Midway Drive, Suite G, in Point Loma.
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    Using Tarot, a local psychic foresees Trump’s re-election, a change of direction in world outlook, and future problems with over reliance on technological causing people to be more out of touch with themselves and each other. That’s what was in the cards for Jonathan Marks of Metaphysical Solutions at 1330 Garnet Ave. in Pacific Beach. Of Eastern European lineage, Marks claims his family, especially the women, have been psychic. As we gaze ahead in the new year, Beach & Bay Press talked to Marks along with two other local avowed psychics – Dr. Alexandra Andrews of the nonprofit Alexandra Institute and bookstore at 3545 Midway Drive, Suite G, in Point Loma, and Tera Brennan of Energy Arts Academy at 2180 Garnet Ave. – to divine what the future may hold. All three professed psychics share one common belief: That everyone has psychic potential, though that potential rarely manifests itself. “Everybody is spiritually attuned in their own way,” said Marks, who said he did his first psychic reading at age 13. “Everybody has the ability to be psychic, empathic, experiencing other people’s feeling through prophecy, dreams and connecting to the spirit world.” Andrews defined what being a “psychic” means. “A psychic is someone who uses their mental processes, is able to turn it on and off,” she said, adding, “It’s different than intuition. People who are psychic are able to unlock that within themselves.” Brennan, who claims to be clairvoyant, said that, as a psychic, she has taken perception to a higher level, a “higher octave,” in her own words, which she claims allows her to “see spiritual energy.” “I help people develop great meditation practice to heal themselves and to be balanced and grounded in their lives and connect with their own spirit, and find deeper peace,” she said. Getting back to his predictions, which he did by phone, Marks noted, after doing a Tarot card spread, that what he saw was that the past couple years, 2017-18, was a “deconstruction of ourselves with disappointment and setbacks,” regarding people in general worldwide. But that’s about to change, he added. “I see a lot of people experimenting, a lot of separation (from the past) with a majority of people physically moving and moving away from toxic relationships with their families or others,” said Marks adding, “People are going to be very connected into the future.“ But Marks warned: “I also think there’s going to be a lack of privacy in the future. Technology is going to be separating, disassociating, people more from other humans. This could be a big problem in the future.” Concerning politics, Marks said, “What I’m seeing is Trump being elected to a second term.” Marks also made a prediction about the current government impasse. “People have got to hang in there, “he counseled. “The shutdown will end soon. [Trump] got what he wanted, and now he’s going to move into other areas.” Andrews, as she does for everyone during a Tarot card reading, asks the person being read to shuffle the deck with their left hand (their psychic intuitive side) to “put their vibrations” into the cards. The person being read is then asked to randomly select a dozen or more cards from the deck arranged in a spread. “Your energy is going to be there,” Andrews said of the process, where she picks up on the way the cards are laid out in the spread, which suggests tendencies. Using the spread, Andrews then goes on to evaluate/interpret specific areas, as directed by the client, counseling them as to what the cards show in terms of answering their questions about relationships, careers, etc. Andrews does group and individual readings. She was also asked in the past to help out in a police homicide investigation. “[The police] brought me a bloody leather jacket that was found near the scene of a motorcycle accident,” she said. Did the police eventually find the suspect they were looking for? “Yes, they did,” Andrews replied. Beach & Bay Press asked Brennan to use her psychic abilities to gaze ahead to see what is going to happen with two high-profile issues in San Diego: homelessness and motor scooters. Following a phone conversation, and after consulting the cards, Brennan foresaw a positive outcome, ultimately, with homelessness. But, she added: “Too many people are affecting the situation. It’s getting muddied. There are too many ideas coming from an intellectual standpoint. It would be better if it was just one group. But in the end, it’s very positive. The answer will come through a creative housing solution, a creative way that maybe people aren’t totally thinking of now.” Regarding the proliferation of motor scooters, Brennan said: “We need to put a limit on that, and there’s totally going to be a limit put on that. The number of them are also going to be limited down. I see something happening very soon, in March, and again in November.” Of the impetus for dealing with the scooter situation, Brennan said, “The energy behind it, it reminds me of the energy riding the waves.” Psychic Predictions Trump re-election; Government shutdown will end soon; More people moving away from toxic relationships; More lack of privacy due to technology; Creative housing solution will happen for homeless; Number of electric scooters to be limited in March.
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    Beach & Bay Press top stories in 2018: Scooter invasion, pipeline projects, Bahia Hotel expansion plans, short-term rentals, and Mission Bay’s basketball title
    by EMILY BLACKWOOD
    Jan 09, 2019 | 26680 views | 0 0 comments | 25 25 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Visitors to Pacific Beach attempt to walk on a slackline in mid-November during a beautiful sunset. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    Visitors to Pacific Beach attempt to walk on a slackline in mid-November during a beautiful sunset. / Photo by Thomas Melville
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    Mission Bay beat Foothills Christian, 52-42, at SDSU and won the CIF Open Division title, the school’s first sectional basketball championship since 2007. / THOMAS MELVILLE / BEACH & BAY PRESS
    Mission Bay beat Foothills Christian, 52-42, at SDSU and won the CIF Open Division title, the school’s first sectional basketball championship since 2007. / THOMAS MELVILLE / BEACH & BAY PRESS
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    Motorized scooters were all the rage in Mission Beach in 2018. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    Motorized scooters were all the rage in Mission Beach in 2018. / Photo by Thomas Melville
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    From short-term vacation rentals to trolley stops to RV parks to electric scooters, residents made sure their voices were heard loud and clear when it came to some of the most talked about stories of 2018. Notorious crimes, like the patio furniture thief, were finally solved, and the seemingly endless projects, like Pacific Beach Pipeline Replacement Project, continued to move forward.  January • The San Diego Park and Recreation Board’s Mission Bay Park Committee voted almost unanimously to affirm Evans Hotels’ redevelopment of Bahia Resort Hotel. Locals opposed the expansion, claiming it would decrease parking spaces and public beach access.  • The two owners and a property manager of the Casa De Las Palmas apartment complex in City Heights were charged with misdemeanor health and safety code violations. The seven refugee families who occupied the complex complained that the property had bathroom leaks, inadequate heating, insects, rodents, and improper wiring. • Iron Pig Alehouse in PB stopped serving beverages with plastic straws in an effort to be more environmentally conscious.  • Pacific Beach surfer Ryland Rubens competed in the World Junior Championships in New South Wales, Australia after winning the North America junior tour crown last year. "Competing or not, just being in the ocean is great for many aspects of life,” Rubens said. “Just to take baby steps, because nothing happens overnight."   • A study titled Part 150 was conducted to evaluate flightpath improvements and noise reductions in and around San Diego International Airport. Residents from Point Loma to La Jolla have complained about an increase in noise for the past couple of years.  February  • The Beach & Bay Press went out and sampled all the different kinds of pizzas in San Diego in honor of National Pizza Day on Feb. 9.  • Mayor Kevin L. Faulconer announced early February that San Diego Police Department Assistant Chief David Nisleit would be appointed as the City’s next police chief, replacing Chief Shelley Zimmerman, who retired in March after 35 years on the force. “It is both a privilege and an honor to become the next San Diego police chief,” Nisleit said. “Keeping San Diego one of the safest large cities in America will be one of my top priorities.” • Campland on the Bay achieved the highest occupancy and revenue level in 2017 than in any prior year since 2006. The commercial leasehold opened in 1969 as one of the first in Mission Bay Park.  • Pacific Beach broke ground for a new two-mile segment of the Coastal Rail Trail known as the Rose Creek Bikeway. The construction was part of an effort to provide a more convenient connection between the biking segments in the greater University City area and PB.   • St. Paul’s Lutheran Church and School celebrated its 75th anniversary in Pacific Beach. “The people here are phenomenal,” said James. D. (Pastor Jim) Henkell. “It’s just a neat church to be a part of.”  • Bird electric scooters started popping up in Pacific Beach, resulting in mixed reviews from residents. "These new electric scooters for rent all over PB is getting annoying,” said Dan Michaels, a Pacific Beach business owner, on the Next Door social media site. “Riders are intoxicated renting them, underage, and don't obey any laws of the road.”  • Residents were concerned that the Pacific Beach Pipeline South and West Projects were damaging streets while replacing nearly 39,000 linear feet of water main and nearly 6,800 feet of sewer main. “The patchwork is terrible,” said Dan Bernard. “Ingraham felt like the Belmont Park roller coaster.” March • Mission Bay Bucs beat Foothills Christian 52-42 and won the CIF Open Division title, the school’s first sectional basketball championship since 2007. • A protest was held by Mission Bay residents against the Bahia Resort expansion plans, which would eliminate parking along Gleason Road. Gary Cannon, a retired coastal planner and recreational paddler, called the project, "an attempt to privatize the entire Bahia Point, and to minimize the public’s ability to recreate there.” • Students of Mission Bay High joined the National School Walkout on March 14 to support tougher gun laws and school security following the mass shooting that killed 17 students at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Florida.  • After selling its housing community Luther View, Christ Lutheran Church in Pacific Beach donated $138,000 to community nonprofits such as Doors of Change, Rwandan Orphans Project, and Third Avenue Charitable Organization.  • Three PBMS Mandarin students competed in the Chinese Bridge Contest on March 6, at PBMS. Leah Markworth took first place, and Christopher Santy placed second in language, and the cultural talent award went to Liliana Capalbo. April • Mission Bay and PB residents attended the March for Our Lives rally in downtown San Diego along with thousands of other people advocating for stricter gun laws.  • The infamous Pacific Beach patio bandit was arrested after residents reported patio furniture being stolen from their front porches for several months. Jose Luis Manjarrez-Ledesma, 44, was taken into custody following a traffic stop on March 22. • Locals criticized the dockless bike and motorized scooter “invasion” at the Pacific Beach Town Council on March 21. Representatives from  Ofo, Mobike, LimeBike, and Bird defended the dockless technology, but critics said the scooters’ presence has only created chaos and dangerous situations.  • Pacific Beach civic leaders pushed to move the Tuesday Farmers Market from Bayard Street to Garnet Avenue at the Metropolitan Transit System board meeting.    • MBHS distinguished student Alessandra Garcia was one of nine girls from the United States selected to join the “Girls On Ice: Cascades Expedition team.” She climbed Mt. Baker, an active volcano in the Cascade Mountain range, and studied mountaineering skills, glaciology, and designed biological experiments.    May • The YMCA and San Diego Unified School District held a “ribbon-tying” ceremony to debut the new shared multipurpose field at Pacific Beach Middle School. • SeaWorld's new roller coaster, Electric Eel opened and took the title of Mission Bay’s tallest and fastest roller coaster.  • Paradise Point Resort & Spa in Mission Bay announced its $24 million renovation that includes a remodel of the 44-acre island hotel’s 462 California bungalow-style guest rooms by the award-winning international firm Perkins + Will.  • Members of Team Survivor Sea Dragons collectively celebrated their 10-year anniversaries of surviving cancer with a 26.2-mile fundraising dragon boat paddle around Mission Bay.  • Pioneering surf legends Larry Gordon and Skeeter Malcolm were honored with memorial benches at Tourmaline Surfing Park. Mayor Kevin Faulconer proclaimed May 10, 2018, as “Gordon and Smith Day in the City of San Diego." • Councilmember Lorie Zapf announced she would ask the City Council to endorse an emergency ordinance prohibiting motorized scooters on sidewalks and the boardwalk from Crystal Pier in Pacific Beach to the jetty in South Mission Beach. The City Council members voted against the ban because they either weren’t convinced of its necessity, or they felt the issue hadn’t yet been properly vetted. • I Love A Clean San Diego empowered 1,049 elementary school students, teachers, and volunteers to be a wave of change at Mission Beach for the 25th annual Kids’ Ocean Day.  • Belmont Park’s Giant Dipper was repainted in its original rich coats of red, black and gold.  June • Locals celebrated Go Skateboarding Day on June 21 with skate sessions, barbecues, and competitions. “There is a strong community of skaters,” Paul (Pablo) Smith, owner of Soul Grind Skate Shop in Pacific Beach, said, “but each person has a different style, does unique tricks, and follows a certain brand to express themselves.” • San Diego Mayor Kevin Faulconer announced that construction to replace the West Mission Bay Drive bridge will start in July. The $110 million project would replace the current four-lane bridge, built in the 1950s, with two separate three-lane structures. • The Pacific Beach Planning Group voiced its environmental concerns for the new Balboa Avenue Transit Center. Those concerns included mobility and traffic congestion and mitigation, as well as proposed zoning changes to create higher residential zoning onsite.  • More than 200 students graduated from Mission Bay High School on June 13.  • PB patio thief Jose Luis Ledesma Manjarrez pleaded guilty to five felony counts of grand theft. He was later sentenced to a year in jail. • Mayor Kevin Faulconer released his much anticipated new regulations on short-term vacation rentals that included charging cost-recoverable fees to administer licenses and enforce code violations, establishing a “Good Neighbor” policy, hiring additional staff for complaints about nuisance properties and implementing a per-night fee that would generate an estimated $3 million annually.  July • Mission Beach residents spoke against being "carved out" of the mayor’s rental plan at a special meeting of Mission Beach Precise Planning Board.  • More than 500 volunteers removed 1,493 pounds of trash from beaches after July 4th as a part of the Surfrider Foundation San Diego’s annual post-Fourth of July “Morning After Mess” beach series. • The City Council voted in favor of stricter regulations allowing primary-residence-only rentals with a six-month maximum, which came as a disappointment to local short-term rental industry members who insisted it will negatively impact San Diego tourism.  • San Diego was named the most scenic West Coast city in an Expedia poll. • A 130,000-square-foot International Arrivals facility opened at the San Diego Airport’s Terminal 2 in an effort to allow the airport to accommodate the increase in international passengers resulting from recently added overseas flights. • RV residents rallied at South Shores Park in Mission Bay to demand an end to City policy allowing ticketing and impounding of their vehicles. One of the City ordinances prohibits parking an RV anywhere on City streets and lots between 2 a.m. and 6 a.m. • People complained on NextDoor that homeless who frequent meals served at Pacific Beach Methodist Church are doing drugs and having sex in public parks. • U.S. Rep. Scott Peters (CA-52) defended his co-sponsorship of the Keeping Families Together Act, which would have immediately halted separating families at the U.S.-Mexico border, as the right thing to do. August • The water off La Jolla was 78.8 degrees, according to measurements taken by research scientists at Scripps Institution of Oceanography, a record-setting warm for San Diego. It was nine degrees above the typical temperature for this time of year. • City Council voted 4-2 against putting a proposed Aquatic Safety and Junior Lifeguard Center in Mission Bay Park on the November election ballot. “It’s a long process,” said Corey McClelland, volunteer CEO/board chair of the nonprofit Prevent Drowning Foundation of San Diego. “We’ve been in it for five years, and we’re not going to go away. It’s sorely needed for the students, the lifeguards and San Diego.” • Residents claimed the Neighborhood Parking Protection Ordinance meant to curb abuse by oversized and non-motorized vehicles taking advantage of free residential parking isn’t being enforced in PB.  • Pacific Beach residents raised concerns about severely trimmed trees in the public right-of-way on Garnet Avenue west of Ingraham Street. The City said its staff had not trimmed the trees.  September • Residents voiced safety concerns after the Pacific Beach Library changed their rules to better accommodate the homeless population. “We are a public building serving everyone regardless of their circumstances,” said Misty Jones, San Diego Public Library director. “We have a code of conduct across-the-board for everyone. You can’t be under the influence. You can’t interfere with other library users or staff doing their jobs.” • Share San Diego turned in 62,000 signatures advocating to overturn a 6-3 City Council vote in July for an ordinance limiting short-term rental hosts to primary residences only, with one additional dwelling unit on the same parcel. • RV residents who sued the City to end its policy of ticketing and impounding their vehicles, won a partial victory in court. U.S. District Judge Anthony J. Battaglia ruled that the vehicle habitation ordinance “is both vague on its face and is being arbitrarily and discriminatorily applied.” • I Love A Clean San Diego mobilized 7,000 volunteers at 106 cleanup sites to remove an estimated 130,000 pounds of trash and debris, including a disco ball, 641 golf balls, a snowboard, and fake eyelashes. • A judge sided with McKellar McGowan’s plans to turn the two-acre, long-abandoned Mission Beach Elementary School site into condominiums after Mission Beach Citizens for Responsible Development sued in an effort to overturn the City Council’s 6-2 vote in 2016 approving the project. October • The Beach & Bay Press went out and sampled all the different kinds of tacos in San Diego in honor of National Taco Day on Oct. 4.  • A vacation-rental coalition gained the number of valid signatures required to put their measure — overturning the council vote favoring residents and allowing primary-residence-only rentals with a six-month maximum — on a future ballot. • Gov. Jerry Brown signed a bill absolving adults from being required to wear helmets on electric scooters on city streets. • Campland attended a Pacific Beach Planning Group meeting and pled its case for remaining an affordable bay front campground. It could be a casualty in the City’s ongoing three-year analysis of the 120-acre De Anza Special Study Area, part of developing a De Anza Cove Amendment to the Mission Bay Park Master Plan.  • Troy Horton and Kirra Barth were crowned Homecoming King and Queen at Mission Bay High School. “He is a man about Pacific Beach,” special needs teacher Amanda Logan said of Horton. “He’s Mr. Pacific Beach. He is known, not just on the school campus, but at the little league field, and all around town • San Diego City Council voted 5-3 to ban the use and distribution of styrofoam citywide. • Pacific Beach resident and realtor Kara Kay announced she would be competing on the CBS-produced competitive reality TV series “Survivor: David vs. Goliath.” November • San Diego City Council voted 8-1 to rescind a short-term vacation rental ordinance it passed in July. The re-vote was forced by a successful drive by a vacation-rental coalition to put the measure on a future election ballot. • ReWild Mission Bay released the final conceptual plans for how wetlands can be feasibly restored to protect wildlife and communities. The plans include expanded public access and habitat restoration options, as well as cost estimates and sea-level rise modeling. • The “Pacific Beach Pipeline Replacement Project,” ramped up again, causing traffic disruptions in the coastal communities. • The City Council’s Public Safety and Livable Neighborhoods Committee unanimously endorsed Mayor Faulconer’s proposed new regulations for electric scooters that limit maximum speed in designated zones, encourage rider education, data sharing, operating fees and legal indemnification for the City.  • Mayor Faulconer announced that more than $40 million in infrastructure investments will be made over the next few years in Mission Bay Park, including upgrades to playgrounds, restrooms, and trails as well as environmental projects. • The City announced its preliminary plans to improve Capehart Dog Park in PB, which would cost an estimated $612,000. • Democrat Dr. Jennifer Campbell defeated Republican incumbent Lorie Zapf by a wide margin in the Nov. 6 election for City Council District 2, which encompasses the Peninsula as well as Pacific and Mission beaches, MidwayPacific Highway, Bay Ho, Bay Park and Morena.  December • Mayor Kevin Faulconer sanctioned forming a new joint-powers entity to purchase electrical power to achieve 100 percent renewable energy citywide by 2035.  • A new mobility board was created by the City of San Diego combining two previously existing bicycle advisory and parking advisory boards under the same roof. District 3 Councilmember Chris Ward, who spearheaded the creation of the new mobility board, said: “Innovation in transit and increasing competition for the public right-of-way has fundamentally shifted the way we move ourselves around, meaning the decisions we make will have greater impacts on the quality of life of all San Diegans.” • More than 400 SantaCon participants journeyed through Pacific Beach bars wearing holiday-themed outfits. They donated more than 200 toys and raised more than $2,000 for the Toys for Tots. program.
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    New state laws that took effect on Jan. 1 – Surfing is officially state sport, no helmets for adult e-scooter riders, pet stores must sell only rescue animals
    by DAVE SCHWAB
    Jan 02, 2019 | 42620 views | 0 0 comments | 27 27 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Surfers at Tourmaline Beach. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    Surfers at Tourmaline Beach. / Photo by Thomas Melville
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    The new year brings many changes, including new laws addressing everything from surfing to gender identification, to cutbacks on plastic straws and the types of animals that can be sold in pet stores. Here are a few new laws: • Dogs, cats and rabbits sold in pet stores are now required to be obtained only from animal shelters or rescue groups. • People applying for a license or identity card can select their own gender, female, male or non-binary. Those choosing "No binary" will receive a card with an "X" gender category.  • Surfing has been designated as California’s official state sport. • Kids meals in most restaurants must now have a milk- or water-based beverage as the default choice and a parent must request a soda for the child. • People over age 18 will no longer need to use a helmet to use a motorized scooter. • New rules will dictate how divorcing couples determine custody of the family pet. • State parks must now make clear on their websites if dogs are allowed. • Repeat offenders for DUI, or those who receive a first DUI offense and have caused injuries, must install a breathalyzer on their engine ignition for 12 to 48 months. • Twelve years is now the minimum age for prosecution in juvenile court, unless a minor younger than 12 has committed murder or rape. • A defendant under the age of 16 can no longer be tried as an adult sending them to prison instead of a juvenile detention facility. • Authorized California car dealers must place a paper plate with a number and expiration date on every vehicle they sell, whether new or used. • Images of body cameras on police officers, and any other audio recording acquired by a police agency, are required to be disclosed to the public within 45 days after a police shooting or excessive force causes death or injury to a person. • Courts will no longer be able to suspend, restrict or delay issuing a minor's driver's license for one year for truancy or for being under the guardianship of the state. • The exemption from smog verification for vehicles that have been purchased new will extend from six to eight years. During the two years of this exemption, the vehicle owner will not have to do the smog check but pay $25.  • The DMV must include at least one question on 20 percent of knowledge tests (written exams) on traffic laws about California's unsecured load code. • Anyone convicted of a misdemeanor domestic violence offense is prohibited from possessing a firearm for the rest of their lives. • Gun owners with a concealed carry license must undergo a minimum of eight hours of training, and demonstrate proficiency and safety on the shooting range. • Employers must make reasonable efforts to provide a room or place for breastfeeding that is not a bathroom. • Restaurants statewide are required to give out single-use straws only upon request of customers. It applies to full-service dining establishments but exempts fast-food restaurants. Restaurants violating the law could be fined $25 daily for violations, or a maximum of $300 per year. • Cities and counties can now authorize and regulate the sale of homemade foods.
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    Share photos of king tides as they hit coast in December and January
    Dec 19, 2018 | 52452 views | 1 1 comments | 45 45 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Visitors at Sunset Cliffs take photos of huge waves. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    Visitors at Sunset Cliffs take photos of huge waves. / Photo by Thomas Melville
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    This season's king tides will occur on the California coast Dec. 22 and 23, as well as Jan. 20 and 21. What are king tides? While the term "king tide" isn't a scientific term, it is used to describe an especially high tide event, when there is alignment of the gravitational pull between sun and moon. When king tides occur during floods or storms, water levels can rise higher and have the potential to cause great damage to the coastline and coastal property. King tides: occur naturally and regularly; are predictable and expected; and are not an everyday occurrence. Take and share king tides photos at coastal.ca.gov/kingtides/index.html. Use your smart phone to participate in the project by taking and uploading photos of king tides through the “King Tides Photo Upload” form. Start by choosing where you'll go to take your photos and then look at the map online to find out what time and how high your king tides will be. (Take your photos as near to high tide time as you can.) The most important thing to remember is to be safe. Take extra precautions when you walk on slippery areas or near big waves, and always be conscious of your surroundings and the weather conditions. Don't turn your back on the ocean. Please be aware that shore birds may be taking refuge in areas above the tide line – don't flush them out in the process of getting your shot. Some of the most powerful images are taken in areas that are subject to flooding and erosion, and of places where high water levels can be gauged against familiar landmarks (such as cliffs, rocks, roads, buildings, bridge supports, sea walls, staircases, and piers). In addition to uploading your photos, you can also share them on social media using #kingtides.
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    San Diego Strike Force to hold tryouts in San Diego
    The San Diego Strike Force, the newest entry into the 10-team Indoor Football League, will hold tryouts on Saturday, Jan. 5 in Pasadena and Saturday, Jan. 12 in San Diego. The Jan. 5 tryout will ta...
    Published - Friday, January 04
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    San Diego breweries collaborate to support Springboard West Music Festival
    This month, a group of San Diego brewers announced its unique craft beer collaboration called Springboard Pale Ale to support Springboard West Music Festival happening in Ocean Beach in January. Pa...
    Published - Friday, January 04
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    Column: A parent's guide to school choice in San Diego
    Think about the school your children currently attend. Are you happy with it? Are your kids learning and growing in ways that make you proud? If so, sign them up again for next year, and tell your ...
    Published - Friday, January 04
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    New Year’s resolutions for pet owners
    The New Year is here and if you’re making resolutions, make this the year you put Fido and Fluffy at the top of your list so 2019 gets off to a “pawsitive” start. Need an extra incentive? If you li...
    Published - Friday, January 04
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    Mission Bay makes title game at Torrey Pines Holiday Basketball Classic
    Mission Bay advanced against Torrey Pines on a buzzer beater by Boogie Ellis as the Bucs won the quarter final game, 64-63, in the National Division of the Torrey Pines Holiday Basketball Classic i...
    Published - Thursday, January 03
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    Top baby names in San Diego County in 2018
    The County Health and Human Services Agency records all births in the region. Last year, a total of 41,555 babies were born in San Diego County: 21,313 boys and 20,242 girls. Here are the top baby ...
    Published - Thursday, January 03
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    Point Loma-based Pacific Records set to drop new releases
    Point Loma-based music label Pacific Records is coming off a banner year, with 2018 seeing numerous and diverse releases, which ranged from boy band hit makers O-Town to legendary rocker Lemmy Kilm...
    Published - Thursday, January 03
    full story
    7 easy tips to make your new year healthier
    Many people start off the new year with resolutions aimed at creating a healthier version of themselves. As we know, all too often those resolutions start to fade away as the calendar starts marchi...
    Published - Thursday, January 03
    full story
    SDHS reminds pet parents to take care of animals during freeze warning
    With a freeze warning in effect across San Diego until Thursday morning, San Diego Humane Society reminds pet owners to take extra care of their pets during cold weather. San Diego Humane Society r...
    Published - Wednesday, January 02
    full story
    Rumors of store closings unfounded, except for Ace Hardware at Liberty Station
    With the recent sale of Liberty Station, rumors are rampant about stores closing, moving, going out of business, etc. I have had several calls about which rumor is true and which isn’t. So let’s pu...
    Published - Wednesday, January 02
    full story
    Pointer boys basketball starts strong
    Pointer boys basketball head coach Josh Aros has seen his team run to an early-season record of 10-4 and has high hopes to have his squad land atop the Eastern League standings when the regular sea...
    Published - Wednesday, January 02
    full story
    Current Issues(Archives)
    The Peninsula Beacon, January 17th, 2018
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    The Peninsula Beacon, January 17th, 2018
    La Jolla Village News, January 11th, 2019
    download La Jolla Village News, January 11th, 2019
    La Jolla Village News, January 11th, 2019
    Beach & Bay Press, January 10th, 2019
    download Beach & Bay Press, January 10th, 2019
    Beach & Bay Press, January 10th, 2019
    The Peninsula Beacon, January 3rd, 2019
    download The Peninsula Beacon, January 3rd, 2019
    The Peninsula Beacon, January 3rd, 2019