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    Massive Mavericks Beach Club riding waves of anticipation
    by PAIGE FULFER
    Feb 21, 2018 | 471 views | 0 0 comments | 1 1 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Located on a 15,000-square-foot property, Mavericks Beach Club will provide both daytime and nighttime amusement for PBers.
    Located on a 15,000-square-foot property, Mavericks Beach Club will provide both daytime and nighttime amusement for PBers.
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    The community said goodbye to Pacific Beach Bar and Grill a few years ago, and it’s about time to welcome a new and improved entertainment venue to Garnet Avenue. Located on a 15,000-square-foot property, Mavericks Beach Club will provide both daytime and nighttime amusement for PBers. “We’ve created Mavericks to pay homage to California’s largest surf break and one of the world’s top surfing destinations. Mavericks captures and celebrates California’s infectious beach and surf culture,” said Eric Lingenfelder of Verant Group. He has teamed up with Mark Cirillo and David Cohen to bring the new neighborhood attraction to life. After purchasing the former PB Bar and Grill in spring 2015, the building was completely torn down for a full remodel. With a brand new design and architecture plan headed by Bluemotif Architecture, Mavericks’ two-story party playground is filled with ample space for dancing, dining, and drinking. Visitors can expect outdoor games, cocktails, food, flat screen TVs, sports, a dance club, and plenty of open-air seating.  Verant Group is no stranger to the bustling bar / restaurant scene in San Diego. Their other locations around town include barleymash, Tavern, Sandbar Sports Grill, True North Tavern, Westroot, The Smoking Gun, and a downtown coffeeshop called Spill the Beans. Bluemotif Architecture has also been the mastermind behind San Diego favorites Kettner Exchange, The Crack Shack, Queensborough, and the newly popular Green Acre/ Campus Pointe. With the expertise and experience of the Verant Group and Bluemotif collaboration, it’s no surprise Mavericks looks like a Hamptons beach getaway retreat, basking in modern luxury design. The venue’s crisp white architecture radiates a light and airy feel, while the market-lights add an intimate, cozy appeal to the giant space. Decked out with contemporary coastal decor and community seating via round tables, the bar presents a laid-back, but still sophisticated, local vibe. Visiting during the cooler months? Don’t fret- there are plenty of cozy spots around the fireplaces located outside. Mavericks Beach Club is set to be an ultimate party destination, dawning five full bars and Baja-inspired lunch and dinner menus. Think tacos (of course), burgers, sandwiches, entrees, and small plates paired with kombuchas, craft beers, wines, and freshly curated cocktails. Lingenfelder also points out that the venue will offer live entertainment and other various events, which sets it apart from most venues in PB. “We have an exciting lineup of entertainment events planned for 2018, including block parties with DJs and national touring bands.” Perhaps one of the coolest parts about Mavericks? It has a bike valet. Enough said! The community is ready to stop by for a cocktail… or two. Mavericks Beach Club Where: 860 Garnet Ave. Hours: Grand opening on March 1. Info: maverickssd.com
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    Pacific Beach residents fed up with ongoing pipeline project
    by DAVE SCHWAB
    Feb 19, 2018 | 6818 views | 0 0 comments | 8 8 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Northbound on the Ingraham Street bridge has been reduced to one land for months. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    Northbound on the Ingraham Street bridge has been reduced to one land for months. / Photo by Thomas Melville
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    Construction crews replace pipeline on Grand Avenue in Pacific Beach. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    Construction crews replace pipeline on Grand Avenue in Pacific Beach. / Photo by Thomas Melville
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    Some Pacific Beach residents are becoming increasingly perturbed by alleged collateral damage from an infrastructure project that has the beach community torn up from seemingly endless construction. At issue is the ongoing Pacific Beach Pipeline South and West Projects, which are replacing nearly 39,000 linear feet of water main, and nearly 6,800 feet of sewer main, with new, 16-inch PVC mains. The project, which began July 2016 and is scheduled to conclude October 2019, at a total projected cost of slightly more than $34 million, is estimated to take 55 months to complete.  TC Construction Co. is executing the construction project on Ingraham Street, which cuts across the Pacific Beach, Midway-Pacific Highway and Mission Bay Park areas. Next Door social media in Pacific Beach has been lit up lately with complaints/questions about pipeline construction and its alleged negative impacts to the community. “The pipe dig/installation schedule is ridiculous, but my real question is why the street resurfacing after the pipe installation takes so long?” asked Rick Burroughs of PB North. “It seems pretty obvious this project is lacking oversight. Ingraham through Crown Point has been torn up for years … It’s dangerous and embarrassing.” “I realized they have to change the pipes,” said Erik Eisenhardt. “But it would be nice if, when [the contractor] finished in one area, they would pave the streets and move to the next. It’s just a nightmare. All the streets are torn up.”  “The patchwork is terrible,” said Dan Bernard. “Ingraham felt like the Belmont roller coaster.” Russell Watson of PB North Shore Highlands concurred. “The worst road work I’ve ever seen,” Watson said. “The repair work is horrible. They should be doing the whole street instead of patchwork.” City spokesman Alec Phillipp discussed the pipeline project’s budget and timeline. “We are currently on schedule to have the project completed in late 2019, but this schedule is subject to change,” Phillipp said. “The project is still on budget, with the full construction contract amount being $34.2 million.” Phillips said the contractor is “currently installing pipe on Ingraham Street between the two bridges near Vacation Island, and continuing work on the north bridge.” Phillip added, “Looking forward, the contractor will continue pipe installation in West Mission Bay Drive, and install the last segment of pipe in West Point Loma Boulevard.” Not all public reaction to pipeline construction has been negative.  Crown Point Drive resident Anabelle described construction workers as “courteous, polite and very caring. They have been working in front of my house for over a month and display professionalism … accommodate our three kids constantly … offered my in-laws ear plugs … They work hard and really know what they are doing.” “All these cast-iron pipes need to be replaced in the street and on our properties and the whole city is facing the same problem,” said David Clausson in east PB. “Just so happens that time is now.” Marilyn Link in southwest PB has also been impressed by pipeline work being done on east/west side streets.  “They get in there, and get it done,” Link said. “The detours are minor … their notifications to residents have given ample warning, and the engineering and planning for such a massive project is mind boggling.” But there have been problems other than excessive dust, noise and traffic dislocation caused by ongoing pipeline replacement. D. Pierce, a seasonal resident in the 1400 block of Thomas Avenue, said, “We have yet to see a street sweeper in the past three months … The traffic barricades are in my driveway … I called the city street sweeping department and they admit that they cannot do the job when there are temporary water lines.  Obviously, the parking enforcement people didn’t get the memo.” Added Pierce, “It would be interesting to see how much money the city has collected in parking tickets based on the fact that there was no need to enforce the laws, as the streets were never swept due to the construction.” The city parking enforcement division could not be reached by Beach & Bay Press for comment by press time. PB resident Matt Phillips of Crown Point North has also taken action, and is actively collecting signatures on the 1500 block of Oliver Avenue and Haines Street demanding the removal of equipment to reclaim lost parking spaces from pipeline work. Speaking for many on pipeline construction, Sean Brew noted: “I live in Crown Point and there is a ton of major construction projects that seem endless — streets dug up, Ingraham Street bridge, a big barge in Mission Bay. It would be great to have more info on what they are doing, and when they plan to finish.”
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    Beachgoers flock to the new trend: Bird scooters
    by DAVE SCHWAB
    Feb 16, 2018 | 10650 views | 1 1 comments | 9 9 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    A Bird scooter is ridden down the boardwalk in Pacific Beach. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    A Bird scooter is ridden down the boardwalk in Pacific Beach. / Photo by Thomas Melville
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    Stephanie Michaels (left), visiting from Chicago, and Pacific Beach resident Kelley Hopkins download the Bird app so they can take a ride. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    Stephanie Michaels (left), visiting from Chicago, and Pacific Beach resident Kelley Hopkins download the Bird app so they can take a ride. / Photo by Thomas Melville
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    Bird scooters are the new thing to ride in Pacific Beach. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    Bird scooters are the new thing to ride in Pacific Beach. / Photo by Thomas Melville
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    Heard of car or bike share? Now there’s scooter share in Pacific Beach. Black-hued “Bird” Segway Kickscooter ES1 Electric Scooters, retailing for $399, are seemingly everywhere these days along the beachfront. The 30- to 40-pound dockless electric scooters, capable of speeds up to 15 mph, are available through a scooter-share service via a smartphone app. The scooter-share startup, Bird, was begun by Travis VanderZanden, who was previously an executive with Uber and Lyft ride sharing. Launched in September 2017, tens of thousands of people have already ridden Bird. The company started in Los Angeles, and has since spread from Venice and south to San Diego. Bird plans to branch out to dozens of other markets this year. In Pacific Beach and elsewhere along the San Diego coast, the new mode of transportation played to mostly mixed reviews. But Sara Berns, executive director of Discover PB, the community’s business improvement district, views Birds differently. “Bird scooters could be a unique opportunity to offer an alternative transportation model, and last-mile commutes that align with our eco-district principles, while mitigating some of Pacific Beach’s parking and traffic issues,” said Sara Berns, executive director of Discover PB, the community’s business improvement district. “However, we want to ensure that the company and its ridership are adhering to public safety concerns, and that of our merchants.  “We have reached out to work with the company to help alleviate some of those issues to ensure they are not impeding on our existing business community, but rather enhancing it,” she said. “We look forward to them working with us and the community at- large.” Dan Michaels, a Pacific Beach business owner, turned his thumbs down on the new alternative ride share service. “These new electric scooters for rent all over PB is getting annoying,” said Michaels on the Next Door social media site. “They are leaving them everywhere and [they’re] allowed to operate without a business license. Riders are intoxicated renting them, under age, and don't obey any laws of the road. Then when finished, they are leaving them in front of doors, ramps, etc.” Michaels pointed out PB has “fought hard to remove bike share stations (Deco renamed DiscoverBike) from the boardwalk. This company thinks they can just establish these in the same places. What can we do next to stop this before someone gets hurt.” There are numerous rules in the California Vehicle Codes applying to the safe and proper use of electric scooters like Bird. Police warn they will issue citations for a range of violations, costing between $197 and $367, for non-lawful operation of such scooters. Citable scooter offenses include: driving while intoxicated, not having headlights and reflectors at night, not riding on the right-hand edge of roadways, exiting bike lanes without signaling, not having brakes, riders not wearing mandatory bicycle helmets, and not allowing passengers, among other restrictions. When finished, Bird users lock them in place at their end destination. Scooters employ GPS and an electric lock restricting wheel movement. If tampered with, an alarm is triggered on the vehicle locking its wheels in place and making them unridable. For more information about vehicle codes applying to Bird scooters visit, http://codes.findlaw.com/ca/vehicle-code/veh-sect-21221.html.
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    Pacific Beach entrepreneur has it made in the shades
    by SAVANAH DUFFY
    Feb 14, 2018 | 4253 views | 0 0 comments | 11 11 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    A model shows off sunglasses from Blenders Eyewear.
    A model shows off sunglasses from Blenders Eyewear.
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    Hanging out on the beach with Natty Ice Lime sunglasses.
    Hanging out on the beach with Natty Ice Lime sunglasses.
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    Modeling the Sunshine Wild and Fifth Ave Flash sunglasses from Blenders Eyewear.
    Modeling the Sunshine Wild and Fifth Ave Flash sunglasses from Blenders Eyewear.
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    If you live in San Diego, you probably recognize a few required living essentials: sunscreen, swimsuits, sandals and, according to San Diego State University graduate and entrepreneur Chase Fisher, you must have “a good pair of shades.” But sunglasses that are both affordable and of good quality can be hard to come by – a challenge met with enthusiasm by Fisher’s Pacific Beach-based business. Since 2012, his sunglasses company Blenders Eyewear has been selling “fresh, vibrant, comfortable” shades and goggles in store and online. According to Fisher, it’s the active lifestyle of San Diego that inspires the product. Their motto, “Founded on Fun. Designed for Adventure. Priced to Party,” says it all. Blender Eyewear’s sunglasses are priced between about $20 and $65 and are made to be light-weight with maximum comfortability. The polycarbonate lenses, all of which are UV-protected, can bend without breaking so they’re convenient to wear for any occasion. “We try to get the best stuff at the best price we can, and bring the best value,” Fisher said. Fisher says he was inspired to open the business by the gear he saw others wearing when he surfed competitively in his home town of Santa Barbara. The active San Diego lifestyle also inspired the products But the true “ah-ha” moment, as Fisher puts it, was when he was in a night club sporting $5 neon green sunglasses. According to him, his cheap glasses attracted as much attention as they would have if they’d been expensive name brand glasses, sparking his business idea for quality shades that wouldn’t require customers to “spend their entire bank account.” Blenders offers a diverse line of styles to fit everyone’s taste, from the bold tropical patterned Kate Forest sunglasses with blue and green lenses to the more subtle Surfliner sunglasses with the light blue rims and black lenses. Often times, the most popular sunglasses will sell out quickly, but being out of stock doesn’t tend to pose a problem, says customer success manager Lexi Horn. A different pair rises up immediately to become the new favorite. “I’m really confident in our brand,” she says. On each pair of sunglasses is the company’s logo: a pair of stripes “//,” which symbolizes “life in forward motion.” “It’s following your passion, whatever that might be,” said Fisher about the logo’s meaning. “We try to design our glasses around any possible lifestyle.” The company promotes fun and adventure, but sunglasses sales aren’t without their challenges. According to Fisher, it’s a competitive market with continuously shifting trends that are difficult to keep up with. With production timelines taking between 90 and 120 days, he says the changes in popular styles aren’t something that can be easily planned for. Horn adds that the company commonly has to “fix things on the fly,” but that the customers have remained loyal through the adjustments. For the Blenders Eyewear team, the rewards of the business outshine the challenges. “For me, the most filling thing is just adding value to people’s lives,” says Fisher. “I think our product really allows people to express themselves.” The future of Blenders Eyewear will include a new kids line, limited edition projects, and an expansion of both the snow goggles and sunglasses line, according to Fisher. The Blenders Eyewear office is located in Pacific Beach at 1940 Garnet Ave. It is open from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. during weekdays and closed on weekends. Blenders Eyewear Where: 1940 Garnet Ave. No. 240. Hours: 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. weekdays, closed weekends. Info: blenderseyewear.com.
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    Education Notebook: Pacific Beach Middle to put on annual Talent Show
    Feb 08, 2018 | 6942 views | 0 0 comments | 20 20 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    BARNARD ART NIGHT 
Second grade student Reid M. and his mom Angela pose in front of a collaborative art mural, a piece completed by Barnard students and volunteers. Barnard held its fourth annual Art Night on Jan. 19. Although the school teaches 50-80 percent of the day in a Mandarin immersion environment, nights like this showcase the intrinsic artistry found within all students regardless of language and background. Reid M. looks forward to the event every year. ‘My favorite project was the hidden messages art station where I got to write on white paper with a white crayon and then watercolor over it to reveal the message,’ said Reid. ‘It was like art and science and magic all at once.’
    BARNARD ART NIGHT Second grade student Reid M. and his mom Angela pose in front of a collaborative art mural, a piece completed by Barnard students and volunteers. Barnard held its fourth annual Art Night on Jan. 19. Although the school teaches 50-80 percent of the day in a Mandarin immersion environment, nights like this showcase the intrinsic artistry found within all students regardless of language and background. Reid M. looks forward to the event every year. ‘My favorite project was the hidden messages art station where I got to write on white paper with a white crayon and then watercolor over it to reveal the message,’ said Reid. ‘It was like art and science and magic all at once.’
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    Mission Bay High - MBHS sailing team is having a spaghetti dinner fundraiser at Mission Bay Yacht Club 6 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 10. Join family and friends to enjoy dinner and listen to the music of The Sea Monks while supporting the MBHS sailing program. Tickets are $20 in advance and $25 at the door.  Pacific Beach Middle - The community is welcome to enjoy performances by talented PBMS students at the annual PBMS Talent Show 6 p.m. Feb. 9, in the auditorium. Arrive at 5 p.m., and enjoy food from Mangia Mangia and Kona Ice. A part of the proceeds from the food trucks will be donated to PBMS. General admission is $5. Barnard Elementary - Barnard will hold its annual Chinese New Year celebration 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 10. Hundreds of students, parents, and community members are expected to attend this free, family-friendly event on the school’s campus, at 2445 Fogg St. To celebrate the upcoming Year of the Dog, Barnard welcomes the public to enjoy lucky lion dancers (11 a.m.), martial arts demonstrations, Taiwanese Taiko drumming, Chinese cultural activities, and food and game booths for the entire family. While the event is free and open to the public, revenue from new year T-shirts will benefit Barnard Elementary. PB Elementary - Carolyn Hernandez is PBE's teacher of the year. She is passionate about tailoring her teaching methods to individual student's needs and is gifted at discovering each student's talents. Hernandez grew up in Pacific Beach and attended PBE from preschool through third grade. Congratulations on a well-deserved award. - San Diego Youth Science is taking PBE students on field trips to Tourmaline Beach, where students will be conducting studies in the intertidal habitats. This follows a classroom session in which students explore the diversity of PB's local marine habitats, from the tidepools to the kelp forests.  Kate Sessions - Many Sessions Seahawks came out to run in the Schoolyard Dash 5K on Jan. 28, at De Anza Cove.  Two of the Seahawks placed in the top three for elementary students:  Ben Giffing won first and Caden Taffe took third.  The Seahawk team also took home the trophy for being the school with the most participation. This coveted award will be displayed with pride in the front office. Congratulations to them and thank you to the Friends of PB Secondary Schools for putting on such a fun family event.   Friends of Pacific Beach Secondary Schools - More than 300 runners participated in the Schoolyard Dash 5K on Jan. 27 at De Anza Cove. Raising money for PB secondary schools, this annual event brings together the community and families from all six Mission Bay Cluster schools including Mission Bay High, Pacific Beach Middle, Barnard Elementary, Crown Point Junior Music Academy, Kate Sessions Elementary, and Pacific Beach Elementary. Top male and female finishers in the Adult division were Mark Kamp and Cynthia Stiles, in the High School division were Trevor Reichenberg and Gina Queck, in the Middle School division were Justin Reichenberg and Alexa Gibson, and in the Elementary School division were Ben Giffing and Navah Klipsky. 
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