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    How, or will, new scooter regulations be enforced? SDPD responds ...
    by DAVE SCHWAB
    Jul 12, 2019 | 12013 views | 2 2 comments | 10 10 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Scooter riders head south down the boardwalk in Mission Beach.  / THOMAS MELVILLE / BEACH & BAY PRESS
    Scooter riders head south down the boardwalk in Mission Beach. / THOMAS MELVILLE / BEACH & BAY PRESS
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    New scooter regulations took effect July 1. But how are they going to be enforced? The answer, according to San Diego Police Department is: The same way all other laws are enforced, on a case-by-case basis, with highest-priority calls addressed first. At present, scooter violations will go into the general police-call mix and will be responded to according to their severity, said SDPD Lt. and spokesperson Shawn Takeuchi. “Officers will not have radar guns enforcing scooter speeds, and there are obviously some areas outside our jurisdiction that we cannot enforce,” said Takeuchi.  Noting SDPD’s workforce remains below desired levels despite recent pay increases and heightened recruitment, Takeuchi said technology will be relied on to help slow scooters down in high-volume areas. “All the scooter companies will be required to use self-enforcing geofencing technology, putting ‘boundaries’ around certain areas,” he said. “That technology uses constantly transmitted data to automatically reduce scooter speeds in certain designated areas.” In specific geofenced areas, operators will slow scooters to 8 mph. Three of those designated areas are pedestrian-only, where operators will slow scooters to 3 mph with a push message notifying riders to leave that area. Geofencing will be in effect for beach-area boardwalks, Balboa Park, NTC Park, Mission Bay Park, Petco Park and pedestrian-only locations, including North/South Embarcadero, MLK Jr. Promenade and La Piazza della Famiglia in Little Italy. Takeuchi noted new scooter regulations now require them to be left in designated scooter corrals, 330 of which are now in downtown, with more being determined in other City neighborhoods. “Most corrals are being staged in front of red curbs, a dead- space area on the street,” Takeuchi said.  The SDPD spokesperson said education about new scooter laws for users of all ages will be a big part of the initial rollout of scooter enforcement. “We will stop double-riding,” said Takeuchi, who added such violations are “not considered child endangerment.” “What you find frequently is that out-of-town tourists are the ones engaging in this behavior,” he said. “With tourists, our first approach is to educate them to cease their behavior.” Takeuchi added the police department has to strike a balance between the spirit of the law and the realities of everyday enforcement. “We can’t take a 100-percent zero-tolerance stance and just give everyone a ticket,” he said. “We hire officers and train them to use their discretion.” Concerning scooters and new regulations governing them, Takeuchi said the bottom line is,“We will enforce scooter violations as we can. We will use education and warnings first, then officers will use citations at their discretion.”
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    SD Dude
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    19 Hours Ago
    I spend quite a bit of time on the Boardwalk between Mission Beach and PB. The new regs, which went into effect on July 1, have had a positive impact. I see far fewer e-scooter riders zipping past me as I ride by beach cruiser (well) below the 8mph Boardwalk speed limit. However, the scooter parking issue remains. Many scooters are still parked and abandoned right on the Boardwalk itself. The Boardwalk is simply too narrow and congested to accommodate the parking of vehicles. The recent geofencing implementation should have included prohibiting riders (and the scooter stagers) from leaving them on the Boardwalk itself. Hopefully, the "2.0" regulations will recognize this and address this continuing problem.
    EarthaBrute
    |
    July 13, 2019
    Need to get some beat cops out on the street. How about using the Senior patrol to educate and warn people about the scooter rules? Police existence is practically nonexistent in SD.
    Jumping off Ocean Beach Pier for a good cause
    Jul 08, 2019 | 11862 views | 0 0 comments | 22 22 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Dozens of Junior Lifeguards, parents and members of the public jumped off the Ocean Beach Pier on July 8 during this annual fundraiser. / All photos by Thomas Melville
    Dozens of Junior Lifeguards, parents and members of the public jumped off the Ocean Beach Pier on July 8 during this annual fundraiser. / All photos by Thomas Melville
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    The Prevent Drowning Foundation of San Diego and San Diego Junior Lifeguards held the first session of their annual Pier Jump on Monday, July 8. Dozens of Junior Lifeguards, parents and members of the public jumped off the Ocean Beach Pier and swam back to the beach during this annual fundraiser. “Monday, we celebrate this important milestone with our Junior Lifeguards as well as fundraise to help continue our efforts in teaching every child in San Diego County how to swim,” said “Buc” Buchanan, president of the Prevent Drowning Foundation of San Diego. “Every $100 donation can save a life by funding swim lessons for one child in our community.” Did you know: The goal of swim lessons is to make children safer in, on, and around water.  • Among children 1-14, drowning is the leading cause of unintentional injury death.  • Formal swimming lessons reduces the likelihood of childhood drowning by 88 percent.  • 79 percent of children in households with incomes less than $50,000 have little-to-no swimming ability. • Research shows 64 percent of African-American, 45 percent of Hispanic/Latino, and 40 percent of Caucasian children have little to no swimming ability. The mission of the Prevent Drowning Foundation of San Diego is to save lives by funding swim lessons for underserved youth and providing aquatic safety education for all. Drowning is preventable and it is their vision to teach every child in San Diego County how to swim. Foundation impacts for 2018: $150,000 funded impacting more than 10,500 kids. This includes 6,000 swim lessons/visits to the beach experiences along with 4,500 aquatic safety lectures. 
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    Tuna fishing industry monument pays homage to those who served
    by JILL DIAMOND
    Jul 04, 2019 | 7149 views | 0 0 comments | 13 13 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Tuna Industry Monument is located at the Portuguese Historical Center, at 2831 Avenida De Portugal.  / JILL DIAMOND / PENINSULA BEACON
    Tuna Industry Monument is located at the Portuguese Historical Center, at 2831 Avenida De Portugal. / JILL DIAMOND / PENINSULA BEACON
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    Calling all past and present members of the tuna industry: It’s time to honor those who served in the industry with a plaque or paver at the Tuna Industry Monument in Point Loma. Located in the front of The Portuguese Historical Center since 2014, the large black monument made of granite pays homage to all those in the tuna industry. With about 85 names engraved on plaques, there is room for more to be added. According to PHC President Therese Garces, she had the idea after many in the tuna industry were denied having their names included on a similar monument located at Shelter Island. “The Shelter Island monument has been there since about 1977 and was finished in 1984,” she said. “It was created for the men lost at sea — they were pioneers and founders of the tuna industry. Their names were put on the monument but only those who passed away on a tuna schooner. The criteria for a plaque was very strict, one had to die on a a tuna boat and live in San Diego.” That’s when she had the idea of erecting another monument that would be more open to those in the industry. “A lot of families were getting upset because they didn’t meet the criteria, and I wanted to do a monument that would honor any fisherman — crab, lobster or tuna — alive or deceased,” she said. Today the monument stands proud and is rectangular in shape, has a fountain with a tuna man in bronze in the middle. There are also floor pavers surrounding it and leading into the center, as well as a granite bench that was placed by Avelino and Mary Alice Gonsalves, who gave $5,000 to get the monument started. “Now there are around 85 names on it with room for about a handful more on the monument itself,” she said. The cost is $225 for a plaque on the monument and $150 for a paver. “We’ve had quite a bit of interest in the past few weeks,” she said. “It’s close to being done but we want to extend the monument one day. When we’re done, there will be more than 100 names on it.” Why would someone want to add a name to the pavers or the monument? “The tuna industry is gone and this is a great way for people to leave a piece of history,” Garces said, “… and it will help to honor the guys that worked hard in the early 1900s up till the late 1980s. Point Loma was known as the tuna capital of the world; a lot of people don’t even know that unless they look in a history book.” She said the tuna industy went belly up around 1989 due to environmentalist uprisings that claimed “that dolphins were being killed in the tuna nets — and people who were buying tuna were worried dolphins were in the cans. “It was cheaper to go to American Samoa, Puerto Rico, and Panama after that to fish for tuna,” she said. “It [the dolphin issue] blew the industry away — and screwed up our whole business.” She added it was the end of an era and now fishing for tuna is outsourced and there are only five American tuna boats that fish for the product. “It’s a sad thing,” she said. “We are trying to keep the history alive with the monument and the pavers, we’re also working to get a tuna museum on the Embarcadero to let kids know what the tuna boat looked like.” Criteria for applying to have a paver or a monument includes being male; a tuna fisherman as a livelihood on a commercial vessel; a tuna industry-related job such as a captain, deck, boss, deck hand, unloading worker or owner; a resident of San Diego at any time; and doesn’t have to be injury related. If you are interested in honoring those that gave, or those still giving, their livelihood to the tuna fishing industry, please see the application for criteria and questionnaire at phcsandiego.com. All applications will need to be approved by the PHC board of directors before the plaques and or pavers will be added, Garces said. It could take up to three months for names to be added and only 20 characters are allowed including spaces.
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    Major upgrades begin at Point Loma High School
    by SCOTT HOPKINS
    Jul 02, 2019 | 4885 views | 2 2 comments | 20 20 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    The 800 building at Point Loma High School will be demolished beginning later this year as part of the ongoing remodel of the 94-year-old campus. It will be replaced by a three story, 20-classroom building. / Photo by Scott Hopkins
    The 800 building at Point Loma High School will be demolished beginning later this year as part of the ongoing remodel of the 94-year-old campus. It will be replaced by a three story, 20-classroom building. / Photo by Scott Hopkins
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    Point Loma High School Principal Hans Becker has read many recent social media comments and realizes some people are upset about the removal of the old Torrey pine trees at the school's Chatsworth Boulevard entrance. "We all really love the Torrey pines and don't like cutting down trees," Becker said. "But three of them were in pretty bad shape with cracks and diseases so it was determined they had to come down. But they will be replaced with new Torrey pines and other new trees and landscaping throughout the campus. "We're joining up with a local nonprofit, reclaiming the Torrey pine wood for use in the new media center as a nod to our history," he added. "These projects have been in the works for more than a dozen years," Becker said. "I think Point Loma High School should represent the best of what the community of Point Loma deserves in a new, beautiful facility where our students can continue to excel and feel Pointer pride just like everyone who passes by the school." Becker explained the other improvements that will be made to his school. The largest of those is a new three-story classroom building/media center that will rise along Chatsworth Boulevard where the Torrey pines once stood. It will replace the 800 building, a round, outdated structure that holds the current media center and all of the site's electrical grid, computer networks and telephone system in its basement. These systems will be moved over summer into a temporary location and must be operational before staff returns to prepare for the upcoming school year. All of these functions will be permanently installed in the new media center including a VoIP (voice over internet phone) protocol system that will be used throughout the school and in every classroom. With the 800 building slated for demolition in October/November, Becker emphasized students will see no issues with textbook issuing or study space. "They've moved all the books and computers to Room 402, an oversized room, and they've re-done the entire room, painted and carpeted it, and it will be open for business," he said. "This (overall campus renovation) is a 30-month process and [contractors] believe they can build the new building in 10 months and have it ready by November or December of 2020," Becker said. This new building will feature 20 classrooms and the new media center. The building's cost is estimated at $5 million. All work is being financed by Prop. S, Z and YY funds. PLHS's unique Engineering Department will be housed there. A project of Becker's, the classes "are designed as a pathway for students directly to top-level universities," he explained. "Students can enroll in four years of engineering classes using digital electronics, coding and hardware. Students finishing the program are already being admitted to such programs." Almost all classrooms at PLHS have been equipped with current technology, which includes an interactive whiteboard, an audio-visual cabinet, a teacher’s presentation station, a wireless voice amplification system, an advanced-model document camera, a classroom DVD player, a netbook or iPad for each student, and a tablet for each teacher.  "Point Loma will also be secured during the school day," Becker said, "With only one way on and off the campus from Clove Street." as a security measure. All campuses in San Diego Unified have been closed for lunch since 1994, Becker noted. Alumni, who are concerned about personalized bricks placed in the quad around the Pointer dog statue and along a bench in front of the school, need not be worried, Becker said. "The quad will be sealed off most of the time," he said. "The district has photographed every brick and will either replace or recast everything. They will be incorporated into the design around the campus.  "The Pointer dog will be put in storage for two years and and have a new home, pointing everyone towards the stadium," he added. "Our hall of fame members will be honored with plaques or tiles set into the new concrete." And that concrete will add increased aesthetics to the campus. "They will be using pavers and more durable, stained concrete to give the school a nicer look," Becker revealed.  When the new building opens, the next phase will begin, which includes removing the portable classrooms. This includes upgrades to the 300 building, installation of visiting spectator seating and a restroom/concession building on the north side of the stadium. The current patch of natural grass at the northeast corner of the stadium will be extended to cover the current basketball courts and provide additional much-needed practice space for Pointer athletes. Also planned for the stadium is a press box and ADA-required elevator. For students, the next 30 months will likely see them taking different paths of travel between classes. "We may have to increase passing time," Becker said. "I appreciate everyone's support as we go through this remodel."
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    Robert Burns
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    July 03, 2019
    My daughters went there. I have always been proud of this H.S. Though the Torrey Pines were felled, this is the FIRST time I've ever heard of any Torrey Pine being replaced on the Point and I've been involved in several battles in O.B. to preserve them. My pride continues.
    chiefdn
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    July 02, 2019
    I remember going to PLHS when the old building was tore down and the 'new' buildings were put up. I dont remember if the 800 building was put up then or not. Funny that to me, those buildings are still considered new, but for the students of today, they are almost as old as the school was to me when i went. almost... but that old building definitely had more style! Good luck PLHS! You are there to teach, not reminisce... as they say; thats job one.
    Point Loma High School theater program takes home National Youth Arts award
    by Samantha Webster
    Jul 01, 2019 | 7615 views | 1 1 comments | 23 23 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    The leads from Point Loma High School’s production of “Heathers: The Musical” in cheesy prom poses to promote their show. Fiona Byrne (‘20) is in red, and Bethany Baker (‘21) is in green. Courtesy photo.
    The leads from Point Loma High School’s production of “Heathers: The Musical” in cheesy prom poses to promote their show. Fiona Byrne (‘20) is in red, and Bethany Baker (‘21) is in green. Courtesy photo.
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    Point Loma High School’s recent production of “Heathers: The Musical” received a National Youth Arts award for Outstanding Supporting Performance in a Musical and a nomination for Outstanding Direction. 
     
    The NYAA are held at the end of each academic year to recognize outstanding theatrical and technical theater student performances throughout San Diego. This year marks the 14th annual awards ceremony. 
     
    This past spring, Point Loma High School’s theater program performed the rock musical “Heathers: The Musical.” Based off of the 1988 black comedy “Heathers,” this musical parodies John Hughes’ high school movies and comments on high school romances, queen bee cliques, and teen violence. 
     
    Amy Chagnon, director of the production, said that the 2018 Stoneman Douglas High School shooting, or Parkland shooting, inspired her to put on this production. “Because ‘Heathers’ deals with suicide, teen violence, gun violence, I find it very important to tackle those issues face-forward. We are lucky to have an administration that is willing for us to put on edgier productions if we will learn something from that experience.” 
     
    Chagnon, who is also a drama teacher at Point Loma High, was nominated for her direction of this production. She has been the drama teacher and director as well as an English teacher at Point Loma for the past two years.  
     
    In a conversation with Chagnon, she said that the enthusiastic students contributed to the success of the show. “A major part of the success of any high school theater production is when the students commit to the production. They really stepped up to the plate, showed up, and made the show a priority.” 
     
    And the students did step up to the plate. Fiona Byrne (Class of 2020) won Outstanding Supporting Performance in a Musical for her portrayal of teen alpha Heather Chandler. Byrne attributes her win to the strength of the cast. “I was fortunate to have a super supportive cast around me who made every moment better. They were great scene partners as well as great friends.” 
     
    Bethany Baker (Class of 2021), who was nominated in the same category for her performance as one of Heather Chandler’s sidekicks, Heather Duke, agrees with Byrne. “The thing that most contributed to my success in this production was my cast and the energy we all had with each other.” 
     
    Ironically, Point Loma High School set out to interpret a musical that focuses on high school drama and cliques; yet in the process, the students created lasting memories and friendships. Chagnon muses that the growth of the tight-knit cast was the most rewarding out of the whole process. “Some of these students had never been in a production in their life and had stage fright. I see that progress in their faces from the first day of rehearsal to closing night. I’ve seen how much confidence they’ve gained and friendships they’ve made in those two to three months. I am proud to have impacted them in that way.” 
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    Roberta Ates
    |
    July 07, 2019
    Keep an eye on this Chagnon director; I've been following her since she was a Stage Director at the Starlight. She's GOOD!
    News
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    Published - Friday, June 28
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    LIVE MUSIC: Summer beach parties with The Mar Dels
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    Published - Friday, June 28
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    Mission Beach Town Council approves plan for regulating short-term rentals
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    Published - Friday, June 28
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    Published - Friday, June 28
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    Biking advocate Andy Hanshaw named to city's new Mobility Board
    Recently appointed by the city of San Diego to lead its 13-member Mobility Board, San Diego County Bicycle Coalition’s Andy Hanshaw discussed his role, the status of the region’s transportation net...
    Published - Friday, June 28
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    Pacific Beach groups survey potential scooter corral sites
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    Published - Friday, June 28
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    Lisa D. Ordóñez to become Rady School of Management’s first woman dean
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    Published - Friday, June 28
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    Arizona man dies from chest injury in Mission Beach scooter crash
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    Published - Thursday, June 27
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    New social recommendation travel app launches in San Diego
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    Published - Thursday, June 27
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    Published - Thursday, June 27
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    Published - Thursday, June 27
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    Gunman in Point Loma ordered to trial for murder
    After several witnesses identified a man as the gunman who shot a woman to death in Point Loma, a judge on June 26 ordered him to stand trial for murder. Joe Bennette Conway, 43, is accused of kill...
    Published - Thursday, June 27
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    Annual Athenaeum Summer Festival to feature local favorite Gustavo Romero and other live music to check out
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    Published - Wednesday, June 26
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    Sentencing moved for drug dealer involved in fentanyl overdose death of La Jolla man
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