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    Zapf leads public charge to restore the Plunge to working order
    by DAVE SCHWAB
    Nov 14, 2014 | 25270 views | 0 0 comments | 4 4 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    District 2 City Councilmember-elect Lorie Zapf (right) is backing a petition drive that she hopes will build support to restore the historic Plunge swimming pool and rally other improvements at Belmont Park.                      Courtesy photo
    District 2 City Councilmember-elect Lorie Zapf (right) is backing a petition drive that she hopes will build support to restore the historic Plunge swimming pool and rally other improvements at Belmont Park. Courtesy photo
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    Lorie Zapf, City Councilmember-elect for District 2, a vast area that represents Mission Beach and many other seaside communities in San Diego, is backing a petition drive asking residents to support fixing the Plunge pool and continue other improvements at Belmont Park. The petition drive was launched Nov. 9 during a rally held by Zapf and Mission Beach community leaders. The rally launched the gathering of signatures in support of the neighborhood plan to fix the historic Plunge pool and do other necessary upgrades to Belmont Park. “We got 300 signatures in less than three hours from residents, business owners, and tourists,” said Alex Bell, Zapf’s director of communications. Bell said the City Council took up the item of the proposed Belmont Park lease extension in closed session last week, and is expected to look at it again in open session soon. Noting Belmont Park is a prime tourist destination, a city landmark and a community asset, the petition asks residents to support the neighborhood plan, which would make the following modifications to the proposed park lease extension: • set a term of 40 years with one, 10-year option to extend; • have leaseholder Pacifica Enterprises assume all costs to restore the iconic Plunge pool, with the city limiting rent credits to no more than $5.9 million; • remove paid valet parking; • request that Pacifica commit to $18 million in new capital improvements in Belmont Park; • require future park improvements 20 to 30 years into the lease term. “The park is thriving under current ownership, which has already invested several million dollars in improvements to help restore it as a treasure to San Diego,” said Zapf in a memo. “I have been getting calls and emails from the Mission Beach community stating how pleased they are with the positive changes Pacifica has made to the park. In order to assist Pacifica to continue to make investments, and open the widely used Plunge swimming pool, I have reached out to stakeholders to help determine what is best for Mission Beach.” Zapf said, after meeting with the city’s Real Estate Assets Department, community members and representatives of Pacifica, that she has developed revisions to the proposed lease, which she believes are “amenable to all parties and responsive to input provided at City Council hearings.” “I respectfully call on my council colleagues to support the incorporation of these recommended modifications into the proposed lease when it comes before them,” Zapf said.
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    Judge rules in favor of UCSD, paving way for Che eviction
    Oct 21, 2014 | 60240 views | 0 0 comments | 52 52 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    A portrait of Karl Marx sits at the top of the Che Cafe's muraled exterior. An Oct. 21 eviction ruling may mean the Che will vacate as early as next week. COURTESY PHOTO
    A portrait of Karl Marx sits at the top of the Che Cafe's muraled exterior. An Oct. 21 eviction ruling may mean the Che will vacate as early as next week. COURTESY PHOTO
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    A San Diego Superior Court judge ruled in favor of UCSD Oct. 21 in the eviction hearing involving the campus landmark Che Café, saying the university owns the property and that the eviction notice it sent last summer was sufficient. Asked for a comment after court on Oct. 20, the music-venue collective’s lawyer, Bryan Pease, said Judge Katherine Bacal would issue a written notice of the decision to be delivered to the collective, after which the Che would have five days to vacate. He added that he thought it was likely the university would write that notice on Oct. 21 and that Bacal, who heard final arguments in the case on Oct. 16, could sign it later in the day. It's possible, Pease theorized, that the Che could be out of the site as early as next week. The Che was served with the eviction notice in June after allegedly losing its co-op status in a Graduate Student Association vote. The university terminated its month-to-month lease and gave the collective 30 days to vacate, which it failed to do. Pease told the court on Oct. 16 that the Che is challenging the association's vote to decertify the co-op, arguing that the governing master space agreement does not give them the authority to do so. He argued that, while the association can vote to certify, no authority to decertify had been granted to the body. Representatives from the co-op previously stated they believed they were in an extended holdover period after their term-specific lease expired in 2008 and had occupied the space on a month-to-month basis while lease negotiations took place. Pease told Bacal that the decertification vote was believed to be a way for the university to bypass dispute resolution and a chancellor’s review, which is why the collective proceeded to file a lawsuit. On Oct. 21, Bacal ruled that while dispute resolution is not required, it must be exercised for it to be enforced. She said the Che had the burden of proving that it sought dispute resolution but that there was no evidence that it had tried to obtain it. On Oct. 16, Pease addressed the issue of why the Che, despite being certified by the Associated Students and graduate student group, had not pursued an extension of its lease when it expired in 2008. “They’re students,” he said, “and they’re not as sophisticated as a savvy administration that was misleading them and providing contradictory information… and also, there are different entities within the master space agreement, which were the Associated Students and the Graduate Students Association, that are separate from the collective. So under the lease, it was actually those student governments that were supposed to initiate this process, or at least it was unclear who was supposed to initiate or how you were supposed to initiate it.” The university’s legal team, led by Daniel Park, argued that the collective made no effort to obtain its certification or initiate dispute resolution during the allotted ten-day period after the decertification vote. Furthermore, he said, the university was acting within its rights as a landlord with a tenant who had a month-to-month lease and that, in fact, no reason was required by law to evict the Che. Bacal ruled that the certification/decertification issues were irrelevant to the decision. The Che had filed a legal challenge to the graduate student resolution, but, with Bacal presiding over those proceedings as well, it's not clear that they will take place at all. The Che’s suit alleges that the university “colluded” with members of the graduate student group to decertify the collective, alleging that students were not given a reasonable opportunity to participate in decisions involving the survival of the venue. This is not the first time the Che has faced extinction. Pease said he believes the cafe faced an unlawful detainer suit in the 1990s and was saved by student action. On Oct. 21, a collective member said the latest ruling was not the end of the road for the Che and that the collective will continue to push to be part of the campus. The nonprofit collective opened in 1980 and has booked such high-profile acts as Nirvana, Jimmy Eat World, Billy Corgan, Bon Iver, Bright Eyes and Green Day and has been used as an art exhibit space and a restaurant. In 2012, it fell behind on its insurance payments and had to raise $12,000 immediately. – NBC San Diego
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    Transients: a thorny dilemma for cops, neighbors, PB library
    by DAVE SCHWAB
    Oct 16, 2014 | 34256 views | 1 1 comments | 20 20 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Neighbors near the Pacific Beach/Taylor Branch Library have complained to police for years about homeless encampments and illegal, socially unacceptable behavior. Police have assembled a specialized team to address the problem, but there are no easy solutions to help neighbors take back their beloved library and park from transients. Photo by Dave Schwab
    Neighbors near the Pacific Beach/Taylor Branch Library have complained to police for years about homeless encampments and illegal, socially unacceptable behavior. Police have assembled a specialized team to address the problem, but there are no easy solutions to help neighbors take back their beloved library and park from transients. Photo by Dave Schwab
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    Neighbors say homeless residents stow property and shopping carts in bushes, deal drugs, blatantly smoke marijuana in public areas and use park bushes for toilets. Photo by Dave Schwab
    Neighbors say homeless residents stow property and shopping carts in bushes, deal drugs, blatantly smoke marijuana in public areas and use park bushes for toilets. Photo by Dave Schwab
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    Pressure is growing to do something about the so-called homeless “tent city” that some in the community fear is getting out of hand at the Pacific Beach/Taylor Branch Library. “The library and its park are a magnet for transients,” said Pacific Beach resident Marcella Teran. “The park, especially, has been a hangout for drug dealing, smoking pot and people stowing things in the park bushes and using them as toilets. The surrounding neighbors of Cass, Reed, Thomas and Dawes streets over the last few years have called the police non-emergency line almost on a daily basis due to drug dealing.” Another Pacific Beach resident, David Thomas, who lives a couple of blocks from the library and its park, agreed the time may have come to address the homeless issue more intensely. “While I understand a sizable number of homeless people have no other options as far as living conditions at the moment, I’m rather surprised they are allowed to congregate on the library grounds (grass and sidewalk) areas, especially across the street from a daycare with little kids,” Thomas said. “While I’m sure the majority of homeless on the library grounds are harmless, it doesn’t exactly paint a rosy picture of Pacific Beach when residents and visitors show up at the library and see sleeping bags, shopping carts and so forth all over the place,” he said. “In an ideal world, there would be a central location for homeless to gather to get food, shelter and the help they need to get back into society.” Noting “police have been amazing in listening to our concerns,” Teran said Police Chief Shelley Zimmerman and Northern Division Capt. Jerry Hara have implemented a “Quality of Life Team” to help with the problem. Hara said a team of three officers was dispatched Oct. 9 to do a transient sweep in Pacific Beach, which culminated in six misdemeanor arrests. “One misdemeanor arrest for illegal lodging was a business complaint at 2830 Garnet Ave. in an industrial complex recently renovated to invite new businesses,” Hara said.  “We received a letter of agency (permission to access private property) because of a growing problem of transients overrunning the property. The owners were very appreciative of the quick police response.” Hara said four other misdemeanor arrests were issued during that sweep for illegal lodging/trespassing/violations of court orders and possession of drug paraphernalia at the Pacific Beach Methodist Church at 1561 Thomas Ave.   “There was one other misdemeanor arrest of a 17-year-old girl for daytime loitering and resisting police during selective enforcement of a canyon area involved with illegal lodging and drug activity,” Hara said. “Officers located a male and female off Pocahontas and Ogalala avenues.  When the subjects saw us, they fled up the canyon. We captured the girl, but the male fled.” Hara said the girl turned out to be a methamphetamine user meeting her juvenile boyfriend in the canyon for possible drug-related activity.  “Her parents were notified and she was returned home,” Hara said. Teran said she understands the magnitude of trying to police transients in public places. “The growing problem with homelessness at the Pacific Beach library park and elsewhere cannot be solely managed by police,” Teran said. “A policing strategy has been used to attempt to  control bad behavior on Garnet,  and it’s like herding cats. The police are doing the best they can, but it is not up to them to solve this library problem.” Michelle Clark, the youth services librarian at the Pacific Beach/Taylor Branch Library, said the facility has a “whole list of rules” on appropriate conduct — both inside and outside the building. “People during the day are allowed to be on the lawn,” Clark said. “They can lie down and take a nap. But they can’t be covered up; no sleeping bags or tents. There’s no camping. That’s against our policy.” Asked whether the library grounds was an attractive nuisance for transients, Clark replied, “Sure, it’s a great place to be with the beautiful park, whether the people are homeless or not.” Clark said the library does have a security guard who patrols, adding the facility is open varying hours every day but Sunday. Teran said she is convinced there isn’t one solution for homelessness at the Pacific Beach library, park and elsewhere. “We have to look at this problem from many angles,” she said, adding a recent meeting was held involving neighbors, the library’s manager and her supervisor, police representatives, the neighborhood prosecutor and the District 2 City Council’s office. “The purpose of the meeting was to gather ideas and look at short- and long-term solutions,” Teran said. “We are looking at lighting, sprinkler timing and changing the landscaping, even having exercise classes out on the lawn at certain times of the day, The library and its park have a  great potential to create  a sense of community. I welcome any ideas or suggestions addressing these problems.” Teran can be contacted at marcellateran@gmail.com.
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    notSelfServing
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    November 06, 2014
    http://www.sdnews.com/view/full_story/25965251/article-Transients--a-thorny-dilemma-for-cops--neighbors--PB-library?instance=most_popular1

    My first time reading this paper and it is revealed that it is less-than-open-minded.

    The majority of the article are the statements of resident Marcella Teran. The author fails to report what ‘expert’ credentials Mz. Teran has. or is most of the article simply one person’s opinon. How is one person’s opinion news ? Is she a friend of the author?

    In my neighborhood there are two old women that are constantly peeking out their windows and continually complaining to me about the other neighbors. Maybe complaining is a way of life for some elderly.

    1. But for the grace of god or luck, resident Mz. Teran or any of us could have been born

    In the sand in Africa, on some dirt in China or on a piece of cardboard in a Latin American country.

    Narrow minded people are oblivious that the poor did not create the recession.

    The recession was created by people like Mz. Teran who are living in houses with a beautiful park nearby.

    They also are being extremely prejudice when they assume that the very very poor are criminals. Unlike resident Mz. Teran, I work for the church rescue services and there are over 100 homeless in P.B.

    Police mentioned only a few trespassing citations. resident Marcella Teran – HELLO - MOST HOMELESS ARE NOT BAD PEOPLE ! They do not need to be sent to concentration camps so your view is perfect.

    Living in the most spoiled conditions in the world here in the U.S. makes it difficult to realize that our petty complaints are insanely retarded. Complaints about someone parking in “my parking spot “in the public street in front of my house”, or The neighbors motorhome is blocking my view of Maggie’s house so I can’t spy on her”, or my million dollar beach view is interrupted by student playing Frisbee, so I will contribute to Faulkner’s campaign to clear the beaches’. David Thomas is concerned about ‘a rosy picture”. Millions of human beings are concerned about where their next meal will come from. How spoiled can we Americans be ? Sad. Tragic how selfish people act.

    Councilman Faulkconer was reprimanded by the other council members for his zest for daily policing of the homeless. The council made him “back off his PB Bullies until the homeless shelter was completed.

    2. The author fails to explain what “Pressure is growing..” means very vague yet very one-sided opinion …

    3. Frankly, I would not prefer to see Mz. Teran, but I am not going to be successful at getting an article published.

    4. The homeless do not “TENT’ there because they never sleep there overnight. Bathrooms are in the Library and open at our church across the street, so it is inaccurate to guess that the bushes are being used.

    5. Young people share the park with the homeless in harmony. Funny, it is just the old people that have a problem … hummm.

    6. The park was built by funds donated by Earl Taylor for everyone to enjoy … the rich complainers, tourists, students, residents, EVERYONE … even the poor.

    MOST OF THE HOMELEES PAID ENOUGH TAXES AT ONE TO ENJOY THE PARK AS MUCH AND AS LONG AS THEY WANT. Silly, but that is how America works.

    1. I salute Mz. Clark for being a person with a normal perspective on sharing the world with others and not being a selfish complainer. She gets it. The whole library staff, Christina, Evan, Security Al … they all get it. Captain Hara gets it. I live across from the library and my neighbors all get it.

    Mz. Teran could become destitute tomorrow, wouldn’t another tune would be sung then.

    If the author became destitute tomorrow, wouldn’t another type of article be published.

    Criminalization of Homelessness in U.S. Cities

    Nextdoor.com: social-media site emerges as powerful networking tool
    by DAVE SCHWAB
    Oct 16, 2014 | 2325 views | 0 0 comments | 11 11 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Pacific Beach residents are taking advantage of social-networking options like Nextdoor.com to raise and discuss neighborhood issues and even to find lost pets as in this post above.
    Pacific Beach residents are taking advantage of social-networking options like Nextdoor.com to raise and discuss neighborhood issues and even to find lost pets as in this post above.
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    Even missing pets part, parcel of growing online attraction Back in the old days, when you lost your pet, your only recourse was to call on friends to help or post the pet’s picture on a flyer nailed to neighborhood telephone poles and hope for the best. Today, with the networking help of community websites like Nextdoor.com and other social media, there are many more avenues to pursue much more quickly than ever before. And coastal residents like Elizabeth “Raz” Rasmussen of Pacific Beach are taking advantage of the ever-increasing reach of modern technology to help locate and secure their treasured lost pets. Rasmussen’s African grey parrot, Carly Lu, has been missing since June 26. Though it’s been more than three months, she’s continuing the quest and remains hopeful of ultimate success. “Carly’s been seen twice in Pacific Beach within the last two weeks,” said Rasmussen. “We know she’s still around here and that she is still fine.” Rasmussen said the social networking ties she’s established on NextDoor have established 17 confirmed “spottings” of Carly in and around Pacific Beach since the bird disappeared. The parrot was seen Aug. 1 at Tourmaline Beach in PB. Rasmussen said Carly Lu was last seen at Bella Pacific Condos in the hills surrounding the In-N-Out Burger near Interstate 5. “She’s in the Loring Street corridor from the beach to the freeway,” said Rasmussen, who said she’s been “plastering posters all over town” ever since with renewed confidence that Carly Lu may yet prove retrievable. Pigeon-size Carly Lu is distinguishable — particularly by her bright red tail. Her call is also distinctive, with its repertoire of whistles, beeps and electronic sounds. Those folks who see or hear the missing parrot are urged to call (858) 699-8368. There’s also a Facebook page called Lost & Found Pets of San Diego and Beyond where people can post about lost and found pets.   “That’s probably a good place to start,” Rasmussen said, adding Nextdoor.com’s website version has a Lost & Found section that’s usually mostly pets. “I know people have found them (pets) through that,” she said. A perusal of Nextdoor’s neighborhood information-sharing website on nearly any given day reveals a host of missing dogs, cats, cockatiels — even tortoises. Here is a list of lost pets listed recently in Nextdoor.com’s Crown Point North Lost & Found section: • “My daughter’s blue-and-white parakeet got out of the house. She is devastated. Call (858) 274-4072.” • “Found cat. So sweet. Sarah Rossetto from P.B. Southwest Central.” • “Found dog. Burak Dogan from Mission Bay.” • “Found: 2 dogs at PB Christian Church, Sept. 15, Kathy Miller, PB North Shore Highlands.” • “Missing black-and-white male cat — Zig, Alyssa Muto from Riviera Sail Bay.” • “Lost dog Maya; large Tan and black female Siberian husky/pit mix, Officer Larry Hesselgesser from San Diego Police Department. Many of the stories on the site result in happy endings. Fido the dog or Felix the cat is often found. Such in the case with Sharon Wampler of Bird Rock, whose missing cat was successfully retrieved through social media. “Thanks to the Bird Rock Community Council’s (BRCC’s) e-blast, our missing 19-year-old cat, Rizelle, was returned recently,” Wampler said. “Apparently, she spent four nights with a family eating salmon and keeping their brown lab[rador] company, feeling right at home. Wampler said the outpouring of supportive emails she received about her lost cat “was astounding.” “We are grateful for the kindness of so many thoughtful and caring neighbors,” Wampler said. One Pacific Beach resident, Jonathan West of PB North Shore Highlands, went so far on Nextdoor.com as to find himself involved in a “shared conversation” with a number of neighbors who had been complaining of having been disturbed by cats. West said he found this “little message” on his doorstep: “I am a cat, somewhat of an unleashed hairball with an attitude, and I have something to share with all you argumentative human types who have decided to text about we cats on your special little social community website. “I roam through your neighborhoods, catching rats, chasing birds away … and now and again making myself available for petting and strange conversations aimed at us, which we don’t really understand. But through it all, we do somehow manage to put up with you humans and I am really quite appalled to find that some of you don’t actually find us to be absolutely adorable … I certainly hope that the rest of you will straighten out those confused souls who have this most unfortunate problem. And that’s about all I’m going to say right now. I’ve got to get back to being the sort of cat that won’t take the time to tell you like it is, because we normally feel you should all understand things like this without any of us having to spell it out for you. “I just have one final word, and I hope you will take it very, very seriously, for all the complex ramifications that it intends to communicate. That word is simply: ‘Meow!’”
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    Mission Bay site among first in city to see reverse-angle parking stalls
    by DAVE SCHWAB
    Oct 16, 2014 | 1868 views | 0 0 comments | 9 9 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    A couple prepares for some relaxation at Mission Bay Park after parking in one of the new reverse-parking stalls the city is beginning to implement. 			       Photo by Dave Schwab
    A couple prepares for some relaxation at Mission Bay Park after parking in one of the new reverse-parking stalls the city is beginning to implement. Photo by Dave Schwab
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    Reverse-parking stalls at Mission Bay Park are designed to give the motorist a better view of the approaching bicyclist prior to pulling out of a parking stall. Photo by Dave Schwab
    Reverse-parking stalls at Mission Bay Park are designed to give the motorist a better view of the approaching bicyclist prior to pulling out of a parking stall. Photo by Dave Schwab
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    Reverse-angle parking — backward-parking stalls, if you will — is now a reality at Mission Bay Park. “The angle stalls are pointing the other direction; you have to back into the spot,” said Pacific Beach Planning Group member Don Gross. “It’s better for bikes and for any kind of bike facility like a class 2 bike lane [a striped lane for one-way bike travel on a street or highway adjacent to auto travel lanes].” The city currently has two existing locations with reverse-angle parking: 1300 East Mission Bay Drive in Pacific Beach; and Euclid Avenue in San Diego between Monroe Avenue and El Cajon Boulevard. Another at 25th Street between Broadway and B Street is scheduled to have reverse-angle parking soon. “At this point, reverse-angle parking is primarily going to be used on streets that are either heavily used bike routes or existing and planned bike lanes,” said Gary Pence, a senior San Diego traffic engineer who’s getting the word out about the new, safer parking arrangement. “Having reverse-angle parking on the street is safer for bicyclists because the motorist has a better view of the approaching bicyclist prior to pulling out of the parking stall,” Pence said. “Reverse-angle parking also provides the motorist with a better view of oncoming traffic while pulling out. Loading and unloading children into and out of the car is safer because the door of the car acts as a barrier and opens to the sidewalk instead of into traffic. Additionally, loading and unloading at the back of a vehicle takes place on the sidewalk, as opposed to a busy travel way.” Pence said other cities like New York, Portland, Seattle, Vancouver, Washington, D.C., San Francisco and Salt Lake City have also had success with this parking configuration. Gross concedes, however, that reverse-angle parking is a tough transition for some. “It’s taking some time to get people to figure out how to use it,” he said, noting “signs are posted” informing people that they need to be “backing in” to the parking space. Gross said it’s encouraging that the city is doing something tangible to make roadways safer for cyclists. “There’s an added benefit down there with getting strollers out and with kids getting out of their cars and heading right to the park instead of walking out into the street and around the car.” Advocates point to reverse-angle parking’s benefits: • Improved visibility and increased field of vision; motorists are better able to see oncoming traffic. • Decreased collisions and reduced threat of runaway vehicles. • Improved safety for children and cyclists. • Improved loading and unloading logistics. • Improved disabled parking. • Increased space, as reverse-angle parking doesn’t require as much space to maneuver, resulting in more parking spaces and additional room for sidewalks, bicycles, et cetera. • Has a traffic-calming affect as it encourages vehicles to slow down.
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    News
    Lifeguards of the Year leave legacy during Mission Beach in ceremony
    Daryl McDonald and Tore Blichfeldt were honored as San Diego City Lifeguards of the Year on Sept. 27 at the Swell Café in Mission Beach. District 2 City Councilman Ed Harris, himself a veteran life...
    Oct 16, 2014 | 0 0 comments | 9 9 recommendations | email to a friend
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    Sports
    Pointers hit high gear with wins over Scripps Ranch, Santana
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    Oct 08, 2014 | 0 0 comments | 13 13 recommendations | email to a friend
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    Arts & Entertainment
    Live Music
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    Oct 16, 2014 | 0 0 comments | 26 26 recommendations | email to a friend
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    Business
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    In early 2015, the Catamaran Resort Hotel and Spa will unveil its new multi-million-dollar restaurant with a chef-driven concept introducing California casual cuisine. The yet-to-be-named restauran...
    Nov 14, 2014 | 0 0 comments | 5 5 recommendations | email to a friend
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