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    CD golfer Savannah Magallon has a clear view of the fairway
    by ED PIPER
    Dec 11, 2014 | 16562 views | 0 0 comments | 6 6 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Savannah Magallon’s 2013 knee injury has left her none the worse for wear in her sport. PHOTO BY ED PIPER
    Savannah Magallon’s 2013 knee injury has left her none the worse for wear in her sport. PHOTO BY ED PIPER
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    You look at a golfer out on the links, and you think all that is going on is selecting a club, setting up a shot and working on the short game, when what is really going on is moral support, a shoulder to cry on, the right coach at the right time. Savannah Magallon, a junior at La Jolla Country Day School, was struggling. Mom was facing surgery and radiation in her cancer treatment, and dad had experienced kidney failure. In the middle of all this, Savannah, trying to impress in a club softball tryout last summer, injured her knee on a bang-bang “do-or-die,” scooping a grounder up and making the throw on the run. At least that’s the way the play was supposed to unfold. Instead, the Torrey upperclassman, performing on a jutted field, set her left foot in a hole, and — twist! — wrenched her knee. “I never went to a doctor. ‘Wait a week, and let’s see.’ That’s always my approach,” said Magallon, a hard-working, goal-oriented young woman who doesn’t savor time out when she’s working her life plan. She still doesn’t know what the diagnosis on the knee would have been. “I had a funny tan — funky — with a knee brace that summer. My friends put a photo on Facebook of just the knee.” One thing led to another, and Savannah, the only child of parents who own their own business, switched sports, from softball to golf. “The softball coach was really mad,” she related. She picked up some golf clubs and played on Country Day coach Bill Cahoone’s team last fall without any prior practice or coaching. The knee wasn’t severely tested and didn’t present problems. “When it gets cold,” Magallon said, “it can get sore.” Cahoone, Torrey golf coach for the past 20 years, was of course delighted to have her. “I told her when she was a sophomore that she had more of a chance to get a college scholarship in golf than softball,” he said. When he left during a reporter’s interview of the student-athlete, the junior gave him a parting hug, an indication of the bond they have created. Thoroughly appropriate, very refreshing in this day of high-pressure prep athletics. Where she has taken it, a year later, is nose-to-the-grindstone, dedicated practice and improvement, dropping what was a score in the 50s or 60s for nine holes two years ago, to a score in the upper 70s over 18 holes in practice, lower 80s in tournaments. Key relationships that helped get her emotionally through her tumultuous sophomore year, in view of her parents’ health challenges, were two mentors who took her under their wing at a crucial time. “Bob Madsen is like a member of the family now,” said Cahoone’s most improved player on the squad. Magallon explained that she hit a few balls for Madsen, head of instruction at Sycuan, and that he immediately took her on as a project. The other was Patrick Baynes, 21, who became her playing buddy. One worked with Savannah on specific skills; the other walked the course with her and provided the kind of moral support that only presence can give. “Here was a person you’d only known six months,” she said of Baynes, yet the emotional support he was lending was equivalent to years of bonding. While she got through her sophomore year academically, she was working her plan on the golf course to increase her skills. The goal: a college scholarship. “I really enjoy it. I can sit there and chip a ton of balls and enjoy it,” she said. “I like working toward a goal. I’ll pick a pin and (think), where am I going to leave the ball? I’ll make a 2-foot circle. I’ll make a 3-foot, 6-foot, 9-foot putt. It’s satisfying to reach your goal.” She’s not one of the Torreys’ top players — yet. Nonetheless, Cahoone says, “I haven’t had someone improve that much in one season.” How does she do it? “She’s extra-committed, driven to excel and improve her game.” “(Savannah)’s engaged in the game,” Cahoone continued, “to the point where everything is new to her.” She pays attention to every detail of her game in her headlong dash to progress. Magallon is “very close” and fiercely loyal to her parents, Omar and Katherine. Asked why she is so motivated, she doesn’t hesitate to say, “Upbringing.” “My parents,” she said, “always taught me to be strong. To not follow others. I make my own path.” Looking ahead to two years from now, she’d like to go to San Diego State University, her parents’ alma mater, study business and marketing, and play golf on a full-ride if they would take her. This is the school “I always told my parents I would never go to,” she laughed. But she would like to stay close to home, to keep a watchful eye on her parents’ health situations, though she said both are doing well now. She also said SDSU has a strong undergraduate business program.
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    Wildlife photographer Mangelsen has seen it all; now you can too
    Dec 11, 2014 | 20352 views | 0 0 comments | 3 3 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Renowned wildlife photographer Thomas Mangelsen says man-versus-lion shoots are “cool.” PHOTO BY THOMAS D. MANGELSEN
    Renowned wildlife photographer Thomas Mangelsen says man-versus-lion shoots are “cool.” PHOTO BY THOMAS D. MANGELSEN
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    He's taken some four million photographs of animals in their natural states – and wildlife photographer Thomas Mangelsen’s new book, “The Last Great Wild Places,” is a compendium of the finest work from one of the most prolific and award-winning nature photographers of our time. “It’s a 40-year retrospective,” said Mangelsen, 69, who was in town recently at his Images of Nature Gallery at 7916 Girard Ave., one of eight Mangelsen galleries nationwide. “It includes all my classic images from the beginning to very recently.” The Grand Island, Neb.-born photographer, the son of a 5-and-dime store owner, grew up on the American plains hunting and observing wildlife. His hands-on approach in part explains his uncanny ability to capture candid wildlife photographs. “I rely heavily on my experience to put me in the right place at the right time and watch for the right moment,” he said. Like the picture on Eastern Africa's Serengeti Plain of a pride of lions sauntering toward him on a dirt road. “I was in a Land Rover early in the morning, and lions, 20 or 30 of all different age groups, were coming out of the marsh towards the road,” he said. “I realized this was kind of a cool shoot because you could see all their legs coming right at us, the whole man-versus-lion thing.” Noting he didn’t get his first camera until he was 23 (extremely late for a photographer), Mangelsen added his avocation “just started out as fun and grew into a profession.” He's captured rare moments and vast panoramas during photographic shoots on all seven continents, from shots of Arctic polar bears to images from the deep jungles of South America to pictures of the tigers of India to shots revealing the diversity of wildlife in the American West. Mangelsen talked about his art, wildlife conservation, climate change and future destinations, saying there’s a method to his madness in choosing locales. “I try to choose new places every year and go back to old haunts I’ve become familiar with and fell in love with, like the Serengeti,” he said, adding he’ll be returning to the Serengeti in early 2015. “The more you go back to a place, the better you know it,” said Mangelsen, adding he also returns to spots he feels have great potential for getting shots he missed or would like to get. “The Earth is a big place. I’ll never live long enough to get to all of my bucket list,” he said, adding, “It keeps getting bigger.” But Mangelsen’s interest in wildlife extends well beyond photography. He’s become a passionate conservationist who’s befriended others campaigning for preservation of wildlife and their habitats, like Jane Goodall, who wrote a foreword to his new book. “Twenty-five thousand elephants a year are being poached, mostly for trinkets,” Mangelsen said, adding the same fate is befalling a thousand or more rhinoceri a year, slain for their horns, which are purported to have aphrodisiac qualities. Mangelsen pooh-pooh'd this as “just a stupid myth.” Global warming is something Mangelsen has observed firsthand. “I’ve seen city-block-long glaciers in Antarctica that are half the size they were five years ago,” he said, adding one of his favorite photographic subjects – polar bears – are disappearing from much of their current habitat in the Arctic because ice is disappearing. “They (bears) have to have ice to hunt seals who haul out, who are 90 percent of their diet,” Mangelsen said. “If the ice is gone, seals are gone, the polar bears are gone. It’s very simple.” Speaking of polar bears, Mangelsen spoke of a wildlife shoot he was on with the late Spence Wilson, who operated the downtown theater The Cove, which many La Jollans of today remember. “Spence saved our lives,” he concluded, noting Wilson’s observational skills as he stood watch with the Navy for enemy subs during World War II. “I was with a National Geographic crew photographing a polar bear mother and her cubs, and a whiteout snowstorm just came up out of nowhere,” Mangelsen said. “I didn’t see them. Spence did and waived his arms (to warn us). There was a polar bear coming, stalking us very intently, and we grabbed our gear and pulled the (truck) ladder up just before the polar bear got there.” Asked when — or even if — he’ll retire, Mangelsen, who lives near Yellowstone National Park in Wyoming, answered, “Just when I die,” adding, “I’d like to die in the field.” To order Mangelsen’s new book, or for more information about him or his galleries, visit www.mangelsen.com.
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    HOME IS WHERE THE HEARTH IS
    Dec 11, 2014 | 772 views | 0 0 comments | 3 3 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    The 57th annual La Jolla Christmas Parade & Holiday Festival is history, and its numbers reflect its success. 30,000 attended the parade, which featured 2,000 marchers and performers and about 100 float entries; Jack McGrory and Bill Kellogg were instrumental in helping raise funds, and the parade chairs have everyone's undying gratitude. Parade director Mike Carlin and his family made sure there were no injuries among animals and people, all of whom enjoyed glorious skies and 80-degree temps. Please look for more images in next week's La Jolla Village News, which publishes Tuesday, Dec. 23. Meanwhile, very few days of the year let neighborhoods reflect the true spirit of the holiday involved – but Christmas, with its cavalcade of colored traditional lights and ornate interiors, is one of them. Shown here is one of the neighborhood's more daring facades, the walkway at the Mormon Temple and an interior that evokes the holiday's charm and meaning. COURTESY PHOTO
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    Son Allegedly Murders Parents in San Diego; In Police Custody
    by Kali Katt
    Nov 28, 2014 | 42715 views | 2 2 comments | 7 7 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Peter Haynes holding teaching his sister to hold and shoot a gun November 15, 2014. Haynes alllegedly shot both of his parents in their home in Point Loma around 3:09 am Friday November, 28.
    Peter Haynes holding teaching his sister to hold and shoot a gun November 15, 2014. Haynes alllegedly shot both of his parents in their home in Point Loma around 3:09 am Friday November, 28.
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    SAN DIEGO, CA -- Friday November, 28 around 3:09 am two shots, followed by five more shots, were heard in a Point Loma neighborhood just above Sunset Cliffs as Peter Haynes allegedly murdered both of his parents in their home. Police were on a local manhunt for the young man, closing down a 3 block radius and entering homes with a Swat team, until around 8am this morning when they found the suspect outside of the home nearby. The parents, Dr . David and Lissa Haynes, died early this morning at UCSD Medical Center from gunshot wounds, after making a 911 call. Sources at the scene have confirmed the murder suspect is Peter Haynes, and that he can be seen on his sister Kimberly Hayne's Facebook page, holding the potential murder weapon with his sister in his parent's home only 14 days ago. Peter Haynes Facebook page https://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1143616437 Kimberly Haynes Facebook page https://www.facebook.com/kim.haynes.984?fref=ts Republished with permission from Kali Katt
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    kalikatt
    |
    November 28, 2014
    can someone please contact me so i can edit this story. thank you gochmanosky@gmail.com
    gayemacy
    |
    November 29, 2014
    Kali- did you try the phone numbers listed on the contact me portion of the site? Starting with the obvious, I know... http://sdnews.com/pages/contact_us

    Phone 858-270-3103

    There are email addresses for masthead staff as well.

    Thank you so much for being the first to write this. The Haynes family is dear to us.

    Zapf leads public charge to restore the Plunge to working order
    by DAVE SCHWAB
    Nov 14, 2014 | 55118 views | 0 0 comments | 10 10 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    District 2 City Councilmember-elect Lorie Zapf (right) is backing a petition drive that she hopes will build support to restore the historic Plunge swimming pool and rally other improvements at Belmont Park.                      Courtesy photo
    District 2 City Councilmember-elect Lorie Zapf (right) is backing a petition drive that she hopes will build support to restore the historic Plunge swimming pool and rally other improvements at Belmont Park. Courtesy photo
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    Lorie Zapf, City Councilmember-elect for District 2, a vast area that represents Mission Beach and many other seaside communities in San Diego, is backing a petition drive asking residents to support fixing the Plunge pool and continue other improvements at Belmont Park. The petition drive was launched Nov. 9 during a rally held by Zapf and Mission Beach community leaders. The rally launched the gathering of signatures in support of the neighborhood plan to fix the historic Plunge pool and do other necessary upgrades to Belmont Park. “We got 300 signatures in less than three hours from residents, business owners, and tourists,” said Alex Bell, Zapf’s director of communications. Bell said the City Council took up the item of the proposed Belmont Park lease extension in closed session last week, and is expected to look at it again in open session soon. Noting Belmont Park is a prime tourist destination, a city landmark and a community asset, the petition asks residents to support the neighborhood plan, which would make the following modifications to the proposed park lease extension: • set a term of 40 years with one, 10-year option to extend; • have leaseholder Pacifica Enterprises assume all costs to restore the iconic Plunge pool, with the city limiting rent credits to no more than $5.9 million; • remove paid valet parking; • request that Pacifica commit to $18 million in new capital improvements in Belmont Park; • require future park improvements 20 to 30 years into the lease term. “The park is thriving under current ownership, which has already invested several million dollars in improvements to help restore it as a treasure to San Diego,” said Zapf in a memo. “I have been getting calls and emails from the Mission Beach community stating how pleased they are with the positive changes Pacifica has made to the park. In order to assist Pacifica to continue to make investments, and open the widely used Plunge swimming pool, I have reached out to stakeholders to help determine what is best for Mission Beach.” Zapf said, after meeting with the city’s Real Estate Assets Department, community members and representatives of Pacifica, that she has developed revisions to the proposed lease, which she believes are “amenable to all parties and responsive to input provided at City Council hearings.” “I respectfully call on my council colleagues to support the incorporation of these recommended modifications into the proposed lease when it comes before them,” Zapf said.
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    News
    Son Allegedly Murders Parents in San Diego; In Police Custody
    Friday November, 28 around 3:09 am two shots, followed by five more shots, were heard in a Point Loma neighborhood just above Sunset Cliffs as Peter Haynes allegedly murdered both of his parents in...
    Nov 28, 2014 | 2 2 comments | 7 7 recommendations | email to a friend
    full story
    Sports
    Pointers hit high gear with wins over Scripps Ranch, Santana
    Point Loma running back Jaylen Griffin spent the night of Oct. 2 at the home of his teammate and close friend, receiver and defensive back Sergio Gallegos. On Oct. 3, the two players accounted for ...
    Oct 08, 2014 | 0 0 comments | 13 13 recommendations | email to a friend
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    Arts & Entertainment
    Wildlife photographer Mangelsen has seen it all; now you can too
    He's taken some four million photographs of animals in their natural states – and wildlife photographer Thomas Mangelsen’s new book, “The Last Great Wild Places,” is a compendium of the finest work...
    Dec 11, 2014 | 0 0 comments | 3 3 recommendations | email to a friend
    full story
    Business
    Catamaran levels former restaurant, launches ambitious new overhaul
    In early 2015, the Catamaran Resort Hotel and Spa will unveil its new multi-million-dollar restaurant with a chef-driven concept introducing California casual cuisine. The yet-to-be-named restauran...
    Nov 14, 2014 | 0 0 comments | 9 9 recommendations | email to a friend
    full story
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