Sdnews rss feed
    Pros, cons cited after OK of minimum-wage hike
    by DAVE SCHWAB
    Jul 23, 2014 | 8353 views | 0 0 comments | 6 6 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Will raising the city’s minimum wage to $11.50 an hour by Jan. 1, 2017 make San Diego more affordable for those with lower incomes, or will it ultimately harm workers by costing them a chance at jobs? That’s the question to be answered after a measure was adopted July 15 by San Diego City Council, which plans to boost the city’s minimum wage to $9.75 in 2015, $10.50 in 2016 and to $11.50 in 2017.
    Will raising the city’s minimum wage to $11.50 an hour by Jan. 1, 2017 make San Diego more affordable for those with lower incomes, or will it ultimately harm workers by costing them a chance at jobs? That’s the question to be answered after a measure was adopted July 15 by San Diego City Council, which plans to boost the city’s minimum wage to $9.75 in 2015, $10.50 in 2016 and to $11.50 in 2017.
    slideshow
    Will raising the city’s minimum wage to $11.50 an hour by Jan. 1, 2017 make San Diego more affordable for those with lower incomes, or will it ultimately harm workers by costing them a chance at jobs? That’s the question to be answered after a measure was adopted July 15 by San Diego City Council, which plans to boost the city’s minimum wage to $9.75 in 2015, $10.50 in 2016 and to $11.50 in 2017. The new ordinance would also require employers to provide five paid sick days a year. Council has voted to direct staff to begin conferring with the city's labor unions as to the methods under which the wage will be raised. City Council President Todd Gloria, who spearheaded the push for the minimum-wage increase, characterized it as “a reasonable compromise.” Gloria had originally proposed that the wage be $13.09 an hour. Gloria warned possible opponents of the wage hike that “there may be better ways that they can spend their time and money than opposing a pay increase to their employees … or by telling everyone you want your employees to work while they are sick.'' The vote on the minimum-wage hike went along party lines, 6-3, with Democrats voting in favor and Republicans voting against. Republican Mayor Kevin Faulconer and the San Diego Chamber of Commerce, led by recent past Republican Mayor Jerry Sanders, have opposed the wage increase. “I feel the deal we reached on minimum wage was a fair compromise,” concluded District 2 Councilman Ed Harris. “I’ve seen the research and data that points to the positive impacts of raising the minimum wage and providing earned sick leave. “By paying a livable wage, we can help avoid paying higher social service costs, and by providing earned sick leave, we support higher employee productivity in the long term. “I don’t know how people living in San Diego can make ends meet on $1,560 a month,” continued Harris, noting, that “That’s what a full-time minimum-wage earner makes at the current rate of $9 an hour.” $9 an hour, the state's minimum wage law, went into effect July 1. Supporters of the new minimum wage argue the pay increase helps the impoverished without hurting the local economy. Detractors counter that a higher minimum wage puts employers at a competitive disadvantage, causing them to hire fewer employees, thus hurting the segment of the population that the city is attempting to help.
    Comments
    (0)
    Comments-icon Post a Comment
    No Comments Yet
    City OKs tougher water restrictions
    by DAVE SCHWAB
    Jul 23, 2014 | 448 views | 0 0 comments | 7 7 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    After three successive years of drought, the city has issued a Level 1 alert calling for citizens to voluntarily participate in water-conservation measures, including not watering lawns more than three days a week and watering lawns or washing vehicles only before 10 a.m. or after 6 p.m. during summer months.
    After three successive years of drought, the city has issued a Level 1 alert calling for citizens to voluntarily participate in water-conservation measures, including not watering lawns more than three days a week and watering lawns or washing vehicles only before 10 a.m. or after 6 p.m. during summer months.
    slideshow
    After three successive years of drought, the city has issued a Level 1 alert calling for citizens to voluntarily participate in water-conservation measures, including not watering lawns more than three days a week and watering lawns or washing vehicles only before 10 a.m. or after 6 p.m. during summer months. California is mired in a long-term drought and San Diego is no exception. Noting San Diego’s annual rainfall average recorded at the official measurement station at Lindbergh Field is 10.34 inches, National Weather Service forecaster Jimmy Taeger said the rainfall amount for 2013-14, which ended June 30, was 5.06 inches. Taeger said rainfall levels the previous year in 2012-13 were 6.51 inches and 8.03 inches the year before that in 2011-12. The forecaster said you have to go back to 2010-11 to find the last year when rainfall was at or above normal, with 12.62 inches that year. Recent changes to the city’s emergency water regulations have established new restrictions on water use, as well as stepping up enforcement and penalties. All water waste is prohibited in the San Diego Municipal Code. Wasting water is illegal at all times, even when no drought-response levels are in effect. Any violations of the water-use restrictions associated with drought-response levels are also treated as water waste. The city may penalize those who continue to waste water with an escalating series of penalties up to and including shutting off water service. When customers continue to waste water after being contacted by the Public Utilities Department’s conservation staff, the city's Code Enforcement Department can step in. Should a customer refuse to stop overwatering, fail to repair a leak or continue other water waste, a code-enforcement officer or water-waste investigator will fashion an appropriate response. Code-enforcement officers have a variety of remedies to help ensure compliance, including issuing a warning letter, administrative citations ranging from $100 to $1,000, civil penalties up to $2,500 per day for violations, referral to the City Attorney’s Office for civil or criminal prosecution and shutoff of water service., On July 15 California’s Water Resources Control Board voted to impose mandatory water-use restrictions statewide in response to California’s ongoing drought. For San Diego, however, permanent mandatory water-use restrictions in place since 2009 already meet elements of the requirements mandated by the state. As a result, the state’s regulation does not require the city to make changes to its emergency water regulations but should serve as a reminder to all San Diegans that using water efficiently, and in compliance with the city’s current water use restrictions, are important to help conserve water during this severe drought condition. “I want to thank San Diegans, who for years have done a tremendous job of stepping up to the plate to incorporate water conservation into their way of life,” said Mayor Kevin Faulconer. “This summer, as we see temperatures climb, we must continue to be mindful of the current drought situation by adhering daily to the city’s permanent water use restrictions,” he said. The city will continue to review the state’s decision and monitor the drought conditions throughout the state to determine if any changes to its drought response level are necessary. In the meantime, the city’s focus will be to reduce water waste by educating residents on how to comply with the restrictions through education rather than an enhanced enforcement system focused on fines. A few helpful hints for conserving water: • Check faucets, pipes and toilets for leaks. • Plant drought-resistant lawns, shrubs and plants. • Put a layer of mulch around trees and plants. • Water during early or late parts of the day. • Don’t let the hose run while washing your car. • Use a broom, not a hose, to clean driveways and sidewalks.
    Comments
    (0)
    Comments-icon Post a Comment
    No Comments Yet
    Bird's Surf Scoop: summer ocean gremlins return
    by BIRD HUFFMAN
    Jul 23, 2014 | 407 views | 0 0 comments | 6 6 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Gremlins of the ocean Surfers and oceangoers are finding this to be a near-epidemic year for stingray encounters. Though some water enthusiasts espouse the “stingray shuffle” to ward off a potential encounter, beachgoers should, at the very least, walk soft and slow.
    Gremlins of the ocean Surfers and oceangoers are finding this to be a near-epidemic year for stingray encounters. Though some water enthusiasts espouse the “stingray shuffle” to ward off a potential encounter, beachgoers should, at the very least, walk soft and slow.
    slideshow
    Well, it is officially summer, and you know what that means, right? I'm not talking about the longer days and warmer evenings. Not even thinking about the crowds and lack of easy parking anywhere within a mile of the beach. Smaller surf and less of it? Nope. I'm talking about stingrays. The gremlins of the ocean who always appear right around now as the tides drop out to negative lows and water temps climb up into the low 70s. These creatures are nasty, and it has already been near an epidemic year for people getting stung by them. Beach breaks are the most likely place to run into them, but sand pockets in the reefs can harbor these little land mines as well. Though the wound that they inflict is usually just a small laceration, the pain can be a very serious thing to deal with. On rare occasions, the stingray’s barb can actually break off inside of the victim’s body, so great care must be taken to make sure none of this foreign matter is left in the wound. Treatment for a wound is somewhat limited. It normally consists of putting the damaged area water into as hot as can be tolerated, then adding hot water at regular intervals. I have been told that the poison from the barb is protein based. Down in Mexico, the locals will squeeze lemon juice into the affected area as a way to help neutralize the nasty stuff. Some people can handle the pain better than others, just as some wounds are worse than others. My experiences with being stung have been somewhat lucky, I'd say. The initial sensation was a quick prick and a burning sensation. As the body starts to react to the venom, I felt that burn grow quickly in intensity and start to spread up my leg. Even with a hot-water soaking, the pain remained steady for nearly three hours. The affected area remained sensitive to the touch or occasional rub for a few weeks after the incident. In 50-plus years of ocean enjoyment, I have only been hit two times. But that’s still more than enough to remind me to stay vigilant at any time of the year while walking out to surf. I shuffle my feet as much as possible. I know a few guys who will slap at the top of the water in an effort to scare the critters away. How effective this can be is unknown. In any event, walk soft and slow,
    Comments
    (0)
    Comments-icon Post a Comment
    No Comments Yet
    Ocean Beach's darker side: an exploration
    by DAVE SCHWAB
    Jul 17, 2014 | 16137 views | 1 1 comments | 9 9 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    A police officer restrains an unruly homeless man at the seawall in Ocean Beach. The community is struggling to find a balance between meeting the mental-health and substance-abuse issues of the local homeless and pushing back against unruly and sometimes violent behavior.           Photo by Jim Grant
    A police officer restrains an unruly homeless man at the seawall in Ocean Beach. The community is struggling to find a balance between meeting the mental-health and substance-abuse issues of the local homeless and pushing back against unruly and sometimes violent behavior. Photo by Jim Grant
    slideshow
    Social-service providers and police officials detailed efforts to curb homelessness in Ocean Beach, while at the same time answering to frustrated residents who feel not enough is being done to solve the problem. Both sides of the issue — including advocacy of the need for services and calls for compassion for human rights and outright ejection of the sometimes harassing and violent homeless squatters — were aired during a public forum hosted by District 2 City Councilman Ed Harris on July 10. Local residents packed the Point Loma/Hervey Branch Library community room to hear from public officials and then give their own takes on the homeless situation, which some feel has gotten out of hand. One woman said she felt like a prisoner in her own home, claiming she’s virtually had to lock herself in to keep out homeless vagrants. Another angry resident half-jokingly suggested the homeless ought to be removed from the area and taken somewhere where their appetites for alcohol and drugs could be appeased without disturbing the community. A local restaurant owner said he might have reconsidered locating his business into the area if he’d known the homeless problem there was so severe. A panel of service providers on hand for the homeless discussion included Kalie Standish, PATH-Connections Housing; Piedad Garcia, county Department of Mental Health; Tom Theisen, Regional Task Force on the Homeless; Milissa Peterman, San Diego Housing Commission; and Sgt. Teresa Clark of the SDPD Homeless Outreach Team (H.O.T.). Standish, associate director of community engagement of People Assisting The Homeless — or PATH — a group of agencies working cooperatively to end homelessness, said putting a roof over street people’s heads is the first step to getting them stabilized and headed back toward leading productive lives. “We’re able to redirect folks,” said Standish of the program, which she said provides an array of services. Standish said there’s been a 70-percent reduction in homelessness in surrounding communities when a comprehensive approach involving wrap-around social services is offered. Meanwhile, Garcia said, “The main challenge for us is to coordinate the efforts of multiple agencies linking the individual with needed services.” Garcia said it’s very difficult to house the homeless because they need to acquire the necessary identification to get the paperwork accomplished, as well as to clean up any legal warrants or financial black marks from their past. Theisen talked about a new homeless pilot program under way currently in downtown San Diego, which he said involves a “coordinated assessment and housing placement program.” That program, Theisen said, involves volunteers who actively count and assess the homeless to categorize them and their needs. Those homeless people can then be dealt with in a much more individualized and focused way once they’re housed and off the streets. Details of the available programs drew responses from community members and local representatives. “You need to take those pilot programs and bring them to our coast,” said Gretchen Kinney Newsom, president of the Ocean Beach Town Council. “We need them right now.” Cathy Kenton, a business owner in the Midway area, said their coastal neighborhood “has become the dumping ground” for homeless people displaced from elsewhere in the city. “Our employees do not feel safe coming and going to work in our neighborhood,” Kenton said. Melanie Nickel, chairwoman of the Midway-Pacific Highway Planning Group, said there are four separate types of homeless in the area: people sleeping on the streets in tents, those living in vehicles, those who take to panhandling on medians and others who lounge in business parking lots. Clark, of the police department’s H.O.T. team, said the key is not only to identify resources for the homeless, but to get the homeless matched up with the appropriate resources. Theisen urged residents to be patient regarding the homeless situation, saying, “There is no magic solution. If you want to solve the problem, you have to put the resources behind it.”
    Comments
    (1)
    Comments-icon Post a Comment
    johnnytheguitarist
    |
    July 24, 2014
    biased article that takes no interview from any "homeless" huh. good job at being inaccurate.

    This article spoke about the homeless people of OB as though they were less than human, as though they were all addicted to drugs, that they had no control, and that the majority of them were violent and would harass people. City councillors and shopowners of the area convened and discussed ways in order to deal with the influx of homeless people in the OB area, and the police department have instated a specialized unit that is supposed to be helping homeless people. In reality, these units are there in order to entrap and utilize bullshit laws to make the area as hostile to the homeless as they can. As someone who knows and interacts with the homeless of OB on a daily basis, believe me, they are the least violent people I know. I've seen more violence from locals than I ever have from homeless and travellers.

    I am a local street musician.

    OB is cheap , I only play music sometimes. I dislike dealing with the negative side of peoples very individual judgements and hyper sensitivity because of their jaded social beliefs. have you heard about that fema or jail bullshit happening in the east. if you ask me America is full of nazis and ass holes who care more about their next paycheck over other human beings because they are collectively stressed out because they are stuck in the wage slavery they chose for themselfs because its what seems normal . normal to me is freedom even if i have to starve. i will not pay rent to an already rich chode. i will not work fo the inflated 10 dollar an hour life stealing chode job for a year . i wont file taxes to the shadow government that consistantly allows the violation of the human rights on a regular basis placing economy above sustainabilility for the sake of their on corperate pockets. i dislike any doctor who accepts western "big pharma" medicine as he end all be all when the cure for disease is a proper diet. or the corperate food that supports gmo and toxic chemicals in food calling it healthy.or the big propagandist newspapers writ to divide my countrymen or the economy killeing greedy beastards that buy their amniesty from corrupt politicians. . or not carolinas FEMA concentration camps .these are the reasons i decided to travel. And what you think we are all the same? im pissed this biased crap get the whole story instead of only talking to the enable andrs not of social injustice. is this real news article or just forced propaganda. next time talk to the folks without the money also because i know these people first hand and this article lies AGAINST them. and also all the people you interviewed are known by us to harass us regularly until we are angered with words like "get a job!" and I already said why I wont ever again because im not going to enable the mistreatment of my fellow man by participating in the American "bull****" dream that drains us till we die. w.e know who and why we are and crap like this article just gives us more resolve to stay truly free and trust we are "truly free". mr schwab you should have titled this article' "OB's bias and scandal. trust me when I say young travelers have been murdered in OB by locals before and it was coverd up. but we saw the body with the missing eyes and stab wounds. and this article is a joke.
    Police outreach program plays key role in solution
    by DAVE SCHWAB
    Jul 17, 2014 | 941 views | 0 0 comments | 7 7 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Officers monitor activity along Newport Avenue, including those of homeless people who might be causing problems for vacationers, local residents and merchants. Photo by Jim Grant
    Officers monitor activity along Newport Avenue, including those of homeless people who might be causing problems for vacationers, local residents and merchants. Photo by Jim Grant
    slideshow
    A common complaint by Ocean Beach merchants is drunken homeless people, or those under the influence of drugs, passed out or panhandling outside their businesses along busy Newport Avenue. Some panhandlers are not shy about doing it.                        Photos by Jim Grant
    A common complaint by Ocean Beach merchants is drunken homeless people, or those under the influence of drugs, passed out or panhandling outside their businesses along busy Newport Avenue. Some panhandlers are not shy about doing it. Photos by Jim Grant
    slideshow
    Police officers are the first line of defense in the Ocean Beach community against criminal activity. Their duties also include dealing with homelessness issues, public drunkenness and finding means to offer the homeless an opportunity to take advantage of programs and services to get them off the street — if vagrants choose to take advantage of such programs.			         Photo by Jim Grant
    Police officers are the first line of defense in the Ocean Beach community against criminal activity. Their duties also include dealing with homelessness issues, public drunkenness and finding means to offer the homeless an opportunity to take advantage of programs and services to get them off the street — if vagrants choose to take advantage of such programs. Photo by Jim Grant
    slideshow
    The first line of defense in efforts to control homelessness is the San Diego Police Department’s Homeless Outreach Team (H.O.T.). The H.O.T. team consists of police officers, county Health and Human Services Department specialists and psychiatric clinicians from the Psychiatric Emergency Response Team (PERT), a private nonprofit organization. The H.O.T. team is available to assist the community with homeless-related issues. At a recent public forum hosted by District 2 City Councilman Ed Harris on homelessness issues in the Peninsula area, Sgt. Teresa Clark of the H.O,T. team told residents the key to resolving homelessness is not only to identify resources to aid those out on the street, but to get homeless people to seek out those resources. No easy task, said Clark, since people at present cannot be forced to take advantage of available social services. Clark said one objective of the H.O.T. team is “compassionate enforcement.” “It’s hard to grab people up,” said Clark, noting, “You can’t put them all in the jail system — it just can’t handle it.” What H.O.T. team members do, said Clark, is help homeless people to “make connections, pull them off the streets and get them more help.” Describing enforcement as “very challenging,” Clark said one resource available for everyone to tap into immediately is to call 2-1-1. That number is an information hub that connects people with community, health and disaster services through a free, 24/7 confidential phone service and searchable online database. “It’s just like calling 9-1-1,” said Clark, who added the 2-1-1 line allows searches for social services, including everything from substance-abuse treatment to child or elder care, food, housing and financial assistance. By dialing 2-1-1, clients are linked with highly-trained service representatives who can help provide a wide range of immediate resources to individuals and families. A recent survey of about 1,100 homeless people downtown revealed that 62 percent were “chronically homeless,” meaning they’ve lived on the street a year or more. About 14 percent of the homeless population are veterans, and as many as 75 percent of them are classified as having serious mental-health problems. Perhaps surprisingly, surveys have found the largest proportionate group of homeless is in the 50-to-59 age range. Another 12 percent of the homeless population is age 60 or older. Two-thirds of the homeless population is from San Diego or Southern California. A total of 92 percent of homeless people surveyed, when asked if they would move off the street and into transitional housing given the opportunity, said they would accept. On the city’s website, the SDPD and elected officials recognize there is a fine line between homelessness as a social issue and a criminal issue. It is noted that many homeless are on the street because of substance abuse, mental illness, or both. Often the disorder issues associated with homelessness are criminal in nature — but difficult to enforce. Being homeless is also not a crime, although many kinds of public conduct — public intoxication, loitering, prowling, fighting, trespassing, aggressive panhandling, soliciting, urinating and defecating in public, camping or sleeping in parks, littering, obstructing sidewalks, living in a vehicle parked on a public street, disturbing the peace by loud and unreasonable noises, using offensive words, behaving in a threatening manner — are illegal and should be reported to police. At the Midway-Pacific Highway Community Planning Group, which is responsible for the area north of Centre City between Old Town and Point Loma. homelessness is a frequent agenda item and a hot topic. Police Lt. Natalie Stone, who heads a police neighborhood resource team composed of a sergeant and eight officers, said homelessness is “problematic” and a high-profile presence in the Midway Corridor. Noting that the numbers of her Neighborhood Resource Team “aren’t enough to combat the problem,” which she said includes cracking down on illegal encampments and people sleeping in cars, Stone has told community planners that police and the community need to work collaboratively to deal effectively with homelessness. “A lot of the time we rely on your complaints,” she has said. “Call us and we’ll have the Neighborhood Resource Team, city code compliance officers or city neighborhood prosecuting officials to come out and clean up these areas and ask people to move along.” The phone number to call to reach the Police H.O.T. Team is (858) 490-3850.
    Comments
    (0)
    Comments-icon Post a Comment
    No Comments Yet
    News
    Harris marks 100 days in office with outreach, tangible changes
    During his first 100 days, District 2 City Councilman Ed Harris has attended 39 community meetings and events, organized three Town Hall forums and overseen numerous street and other infrastructure...
    Jul 23, 2014 | 0 0 comments | 5 5 recommendations | email to a friend
    full story
    Sports
    Sports travel clubs: conflict of a young athlete’s school ties or independent betterment
    Back in the day, the young athlete had it relatively simple: play for the school sports team or play Little League baseball, Pony League and Colt League. There might be a batting cage in town (and ...
    Jul 23, 2014 | 0 0 comments | 8 8 recommendations | email to a friend
    full story
    Arts & Entertainment
    Live Music
    They’re back! After a lengthy hiatus, long-running night spot Brick by Brick has reopened its doors under new management. The venue has been partially remodeled and there has been no time wasted in...
    Jul 23, 2014 | 0 0 comments | 6 6 recommendations | email to a friend
    full story
    Business
    Inside the hookah-lounge craze
    If you’re looking for an offbeat entertainment alternative while you’re down at the beach, check out a hookah lounge. And if you’re so inclined, there are about a half-dozen lounges to choose from ...
    Jul 23, 2014 | 0 0 comments | 6 6 recommendations | email to a friend
    full story
    Current Issues(Archives)
    La Jolla Village News, July 25th, 2014
    download La Jolla Village News, July 25th, 2014
    La Jolla Village News, July 25th, 2014
    Beach & Bay Press, July 24th, 2014
    download Beach & Bay Press, July 24th, 2014
    Beach & Bay Press, July 24th, 2014
    The Peninsula Beacon, July 17th, 2014
    download The Peninsula Beacon, July 17th, 2014
    The Peninsula Beacon, July 17th, 2014
    La Jolla Village News, July 11th, 2014
    download La Jolla Village News, July 11th, 2014
    La Jolla Village News, July 11th, 2014
    Featured Events (see all events)