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    Torrey Pines Gliderport searching for new operator
    by DAVE SCHWAB
    Mar 26, 2017 | 711 views | 0 0 comments | 3 3 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Several paragliders in action at Torrey Pines Gliderport. /PHOTO BY THOMAS MELVILLE
    Several paragliders in action at Torrey Pines Gliderport. /PHOTO BY THOMAS MELVILLE
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    Want to operate a gliderport? Here's your chance. The city has a request for proposals out for an operator for the oceanfront 6.74-acre Torrey Pines Gliderport on the bluffs at 2800 Torrey Pines Scenic Drive. The RFP was issued Feb. 22 and applicants have until April 10 to apply. The gliderport property is a San Diego designated historical resource and is on the National Register of Historic Places, the State Register of Historic Sites, and is a dedicated National Soaring Landmark. It is contiguous to the Torrey Pines State Reserve, Torrey Pines Municipal Golf Course, UCSD campus and the Salk Institute. The gliderport site is wholly within largely undeveloped Torrey Pines City Park, which had a master plan approved for its future development in 2012. Established in 1899, the 57-acre Torrey Pines City Park is renowned for its contributions to the development of wind-powered flight. In the city's RFP, use of the site is: limited to the operation and maintenance of a gliderport; can be used only by non-powered aircraft and radio-controlled models (take-off and over-flight); allows sale of hang gliding, paragliding, and sailplane parts and accessories and sale of related merchandise; as well as operation of a small food retail site (café). Applicants should have a minimum three years’ experience in the past five years conducting similar operations, and lease terms of only 10-plus years will be considered. There is also a stipulation that applicants “shall not provide to its customers any prepared, takeout, or supplied/resale food in polystyrene foam packaging, nor will any such customer food packaging be allowed at or on the property.” Annual rent is $3,412. But there currently is no on-site power supply, water, or sewer, the cost of which would have to be picked up by the tenant. Torrey Pines City Park Advisory Board, which included stakeholder groups appointed by the mayor including non-motorized aviators, environmentalists, UCSD and surrounding community advisory boards, drafted the conceptual master plan for the city park that was adopted by the City Council. That master plan calls for redeveloping the city park, but not “overdoing” it by bringing in water, electricity or other infrastructure. Instead, the advisory board recommended conserving the 44-acre park’s coastal bluffs and native habitat, while protecting site access for all users, especially gliderport pilots requiring flight clearance. The conceptual master plan envisions adding an additional 18 acres of plantings, including some Torrey pines, to 18 existing acres of native vegetation, while retaining all of the 565 parking spaces on the park’s unpaved bluff top. Project improvements to implement the new park master plan were estimated to cost $12 million to $15 million five years ago when it was adopted. Two members of the Torrey Pines City Park Advisory Board which worked on crafting the master plan, architect Michael Stepner and consultant Laura Burnett, commented on it. “The Torrey Pines City Park General Development Plan was prepared to meet strenuous environmental requirements and a vision as bold and unique as the park,” said Burnett. “It included recommendations for phased implementation, and remains a tremendous opportunity for San Diego’s leaders and entrepreneurs to both protect the resources and enhance a world-class park. It needs to be operated and managed like the unique priceless treasure that it is.” “It was part of an extensive process to really look at Torrey Pines Gliderport, its historical importance, and its importance as a regional park,” said Stepner. “The plan was adopted with lots of input from different interest groups and stakeholders.” Meanwhile, Robin Marien, the gliderport's current operator for the past eight-plus years, said he's been running the facility on a month-to-month lease for nearly that long. “I've been patiently waiting for eight years,” said Marien, of his negotiations for a long-term lease on the city-owned property. Of his job as leaseholder of the gliderport property, Marien said, “I'm here practically seven days a week.” Marien added it's a big responsibility. “You've got to keep an eye on all the flyers and make sure they're following all the rules — we've got no road pilots,” he said, adding, “I'm the one with my head in a noose for what happens out here.” Of the non-motorized aviation business, Marien noted, “It's one of the busiest places of its kind in the world. It's a unique job for sure. It has its moments.” For more information, email roswithas@sandiego.gov or call 619-236-6721.
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    Scientists, wildlife groups and fishermen discuss local Marine Protected Areas
    by DAVE SCHWAB
    Mar 25, 2017 | 7818 views | 0 0 comments | 8 8 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    The coastline of Bird Rock, which is in the South La Jolla State Marine Conservation Area. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    The coastline of Bird Rock, which is in the South La Jolla State Marine Conservation Area. / Photo by Thomas Melville
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    Stakeholders heard what's going on with baseline studies of existing fish and other marine species in Marine Protected Areas along the Southern San Diego coast including La Jolla and Pacific Beach on March 20. The public meeting at Marina Village Conference Center was held by California Department of Fish and Wildlife, Ocean Protection Council and Ocean Science Trust. It drew scientists, fishermen and other consumptive ocean users, as well as grad students eager to hear about progress being made with MPAs. Required by the 1999 Marine Life Protection Act and in effect since Jan. 1, 2012, MPAs were created to help repopulate dwindling fish and other marine species. Known as “underwater state parks,” MPAs set aside sensitive ecosystems via creation of no-fishing zones to allow marine life and habitats an opportunity to recover and thrive. Some fishermen and other consumptive ocean users have been critical of the MPA concept. They questioned its viability, arguing it crowded their commercial interests while threatening the local marine-oriented economy. MPA supporters countered that they are absolutely essential to allow fish and marine species adequate time to recover from commercial fishing, as well to help restore degraded marine ecosystems. “We're here to provide you the key findings of the baseline monitoring work being done on our South Coast MPA region,” said Becky Ota of California Department of Fish and Wildlife. “We're here to provide this information as a spring board into what needs to happen for further monitoring of MPAs as a whole.” Marine ecosystems change over time, and baseline monitoring to determine existing conditions of ocean species is a critical first step in documenting the status quo of San Diego ocean conditions. Scientific data gathered during South Coast MPA baseline monitoring will guide future ocean management practices regionally. Baseline monitoring analysis will also improve understanding of fish, lobster and other key marine species, while tracking their numbers, size and movements. La Jolla has two adjoining MPAs at the South La Jolla State Marine Conservation Area and South La Jolla State Reserve, which together cover 7.51 square miles, stretching from Palomar Avenue to Missouri Street in Pacific Beach. They are two of 36 new Marine Protected Areas adopted by the California Department of Fish and Game Commission as part of the Marine Life Protection Act. Additionally, the historic Marine Protected Areas at La Jolla Shores, stretching to the Scripps Pier, was also retained. Scripps Institution of Oceanography marine ecologist Ed Parnell and diver Danielle Muller of Southern California Coastal Ocean Observing System, gave slide presentations. The goal of MPA monitoring, noted Muller, is for biologists to know “how many plants and animals there are, and where they're at.” She added ocean conditions – winds, waves and currents – as well as topographical features on ocean bottoms, help guide researchers' studies. She added the location and movements of many ocean species are “driven by the temperature and salinity of the water.” In his talk, Parnell detailed his studies on the local spiny lobster, a species important to the local commercial fishing industry, located in and around La Jolla MPAs. “We wanted to study the lobster populations, comparing their numbers in protected MPA areas versus unprotected areas outside MPAs,” said Parnell noting lobsters were caught, tagged, released and recaptured in metal commercial traps. Parnell said studies thus far have shown that lobsters tend to be larger, and grow faster, as you head north up the coast from San Diego. Parnell suggested the north-south size differential of lobsters might be attributed to fishing outside MPAs, which depletes the number of larger-sized lobsters allowed to be legally taken by commercial anglers. To learn more about South Coast MPA baseline monitoring, and to access data, visit oceanspaces.org/scsotr.
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    America's Schooner Cup returns to San Diego in April
    Mar 22, 2017 | 20679 views | 0 0 comments | 24 24 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    America's Schooner Cup 2016 winner Lively leads Rose of Sharon into San Diego Bay. / Photo by Cynthia Sinclair
    America's Schooner Cup 2016 winner Lively leads Rose of Sharon into San Diego Bay. / Photo by Cynthia Sinclair
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    Historic ships from throughout the country’s history will be showing off in San Diego Bay for the 29th running of America's Schooner Cup on Saturday, April 1. Hailing from Southern California and the Pacific Northwest, more than 12 schooners are expected to take the starting gun. The schooners range in length from 35 to 150 feet. Spectators may watch the start and finish off Shelter Island. No registration is necessary for those viewing from Shelter Island. Spectators should arrive at 11:15 a.m. Three groups of schooners will each start between 11:30 and noon. The race runs from Shelter Island, out of the bay and back and typically takes 2-3 hours. For those who want to be part of the action, three vessels will be taking a limited number of guests: - Californian – California's official state Tall Ship – a great option for those who want to participate in the race – sdmaritime.org; - Bill of Rights – a 136-foot replica of a 19th century coastal schooner – another lively option for those who want to participate in the race – schoonerbillofrights.com; - San Salvador – a replica of Juan Cabrillo's ship that first visited San Diego in 1542 – a fun option for spectators – sdmaritime.org. The race is hosted by Silver Gate Yacht Club, with all proceeds going to the Navy/Marine Corps Relief Society – a nonprofit whose mission is to help Navy and Marine families. The event will be supported by Star Clippers, a worldwide cruise ship company featuring tall ships.
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    Status of short-term vacation rentals in limbo
    by DAVE SCHWAB
    Mar 20, 2017 | 14123 views | 1 1 comments | 0 0 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    The city's Smart Growth and Land Use Committee is scheduled to take up the vacation rental issue again March 24.
    The city's Smart Growth and Land Use Committee is scheduled to take up the vacation rental issue again March 24.
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    The tide in the battle by beach residents seeking to restrict – or exclude – short-term vacation rentals in single-family neighborhoods may have turned with an about-face at the city attorney's office. Immediate past City Attorney Jan Goldsmith had maintained rules and regulations governing short-term vacation rentals were vague and needed clarification. New City Attorney Mara Elliott has taken a completely different tack with her March 15 issuance of a memorandum of law advising the City Council on the housing issue. "The city has a ‘permissive zoning ordinance,’” said Elliott's memorandum. “This means that any use that is not listed in the city's zoning ordinance is prohibited.” Elliott's memo subsequently pointed out, “Short-term vacation rentals are not specifically defined, expressly permitted, or listed in any of the zone use categories, including residential or commercial." The city attorney's memo came at a key time, just before the city's Smart Growth and Land Use Committee is scheduled to take up the vacation rental issue again March 24. Last November, following five hours of public testimony, a motion by then-City Council President Sherri Lightner, which some feel would have largely banned short-term vacation rentals in single-family neighborhoods, was defeated by a 7-2 vote. Lightner’s proposal would have restricted a homeowner's ability to rent to transients for less than 30 days in most single-family zones, with renters or owners of single-family homes also not able to rent out a room or space for less than seven days without proper permitting. An alternative motion brought by then-Councilmember, now-Assemblyman Todd Gloria was subsequently passed in November by the same 7-2 margin. His counter motion requested city staff do a fiscal analysis to determine the cost of greater stvr enforcement citywide, asked staff to draft and return with a comprehensive ordinance better defining and regulating short-term vacation rentals, as well as remanding the matter back to the City Council's Smart Growth and Land Use Committee for further consideration. Reacting to Elliott's pronouncement, 1st District Councilmember Barbary Bry said: "I was pleased to read the memo issued by City Attorney Mara Elliott confirming that short-term vacation rentals do not fall under any permissible use in the municipal code and are therefore prohibited in the city of San Diego. I look forward to working with my colleagues on the council to determine the best way to allow property owners to participate in home sharing.” Pacific Beach resident Ronan Gray, a spokesperson for Save San Diego Neighborhoods, a grassroots group opposed to short-term vacation rentals in single-family neighborhoods, called Elliott's comment a “game changer” in beginning to address noise, trash and other recurrent problems with short-term rentals. “Suddenly, these mini hotels that have been popping up are now illegal,” Gray said. “We bought our homes expecting to be living in residential, not commercial areas. This type of use is clearly commercial.” Gray added: “When you turn a home into a hotel – nobody wants to live there, it's just a constant stream of strangers and tourists. That's not what our neighborhoods are for.” Gary Wonacott, president of Mission Beach Town Council, located in an area where large numbers of short-term vacation rentals are present, said the beach community has taken a centrist approach to dealing with the issue. “While the MBTC membership has, on multiple occasions, expressed concern for the increase in the number of short-term rentals in Mission Beach in the past decade, and has voted for a minimum number of days allowed for a short-term rental, the Mission Beach community has historically embraced vacation rentals,” Wonacott said. “It is now a matter of working with the city to ensure that the final ordinance implemented by the city incorporates the features in the Mission Beach plan that tailor the requirements to the culture of this unique and special community in San Diego,” Wonacott said.
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    PSJ13
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    March 22, 2017
    I love this part: "the Mission Beach community has historically embraced vacation rentals,” Wonacott said.

    What community? There is no community in Mission Beach. That's the point! It's been taken over by STVRs. I think be "community" Wonacott is referring to the companies and absentee owners who run these former residences - now turned mini-hotels. Take a walk through MB. It's trashed - a shell of a community. A blighted tourist trap that used to be a neighborhood.

    Point Loma’s robotic team wins regional, heading to world competition
    by SCOTT HOPKINS
    Mar 18, 2017 | 8493 views | 1 1 comments | 19 19 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Members of the Point Loma robotics team that went undefeated during a three-day competition against winners from 17 states last weekend include back row, left to right: Andrew Trent, JD Schrady, Ethan Cooper, Collin Nilsen, Joe Landon, Konrad Zirkle and Eric Schuster. Front row: Shanon Lee, Hailey Schmidt, Allison Trent and Casey Wilson.
    Members of the Point Loma robotics team that went undefeated during a three-day competition against winners from 17 states last weekend include back row, left to right: Andrew Trent, JD Schrady, Ethan Cooper, Collin Nilsen, Joe Landon, Konrad Zirkle and Eric Schuster. Front row: Shanon Lee, Hailey Schmidt, Allison Trent and Casey Wilson.
    slideshow
    Residents in the Fleetridge section of Point Loma may have been suspicious after noticing a group of Point Loma High School students entering a home, coming and going regularly on afternoons, weeknights and weekends, some disappearing into the home for hours at a time even when the residents are away. Any neighbors who were concerned can now relax. The students are part of a robotic team and have been working tirelessly for months building a robot. And not just any robot – their electronically powered mechanical creation just won the First Tech Challenge Super Regional event, topping 74 area winning teams from 17 Western states over the three-day event in Tacoma, Wash., that will send the device – and the 11 students who have spent literally thousands of hours preparing it – to a world competition coming up in Houston April 19-22. Team captains are seniors Collin Nilsen and Allison Trent. The team, representing the Point Loma community, actually went undefeated throughout the grueling event, earning the title of "Winning Alliance Captain," which means they were the top-ranked team when choosing other teams to join in alliances for certain portions of the competition. Students in Point Loma have been working on such projects for the last eight years, but this is the first time they have qualified for the super regional, something that required them to finish among the top four of 36 teams at the local level. And work they did. By team mentor Matt Nilsen's calculation, the teens spent over 5,000 hours of time conceiving, building, testing, evaluating, rebuilding and retesting all aspects of the finished robot. A notebook which includes engineering notes and drawings, now runs more than 300 pages. To ensure fair competition, a new common challenge is announced each year. One of the challenges for this year's teams was to construct a robot that could not only recognize the difference between red and blue plastic Wiffle balls, but also scoop them up and shoot them into a raised basket in the middle of the competition area. Another challenge involved picking up large inflatable yoga balls and depositing them atop the same Wiffle ball basket. Robots built must be no larger than an 18-inch cube. Competition takes place in a 12-by-12 foot space with 12-inch high glass walls and interlocking rubber floor mats as a surface. "One of the great things is they give us no plans. Each team starts with nothing and comes up with a unique robot," said Casey Wilson, one of four sophomores on hand to explain the group's project. "There are some definite limitations," said Joe Landon. "Your robot can't shoot the Wiffle balls over a certain height and you have to be conscious and aware of other robots and be spatially aware of the battlefield. There are two teams on the field at once, each with three people, so communication is very important." "For our design process, we try to get inspiration from past designs," said Shanon Lee. "We also make lots of prototypes and this year we've also done some preview modeling of what we think could be a good design. We test our prototypes, and if they work, they go on the robot." With the challenge of shooting Wiffle balls, the group went through much testing. "We've gone through lots of different designs," Lee continued, "and we finally came up with a flexible shooter that can change the angle of the shots so we can shoot from anywhere on the field. We changed many things, but the end product has been worth it." And how are the needed changes made? "The programmer and the builders have to work closely together," said Hailey Schmidt, the team's programmer. "We need to come to an agreement about what will be most effective for each of our specialties. Over time, we've added a lot of new sensors and different ways of approaching the challenge." Some changes involved large amounts of patience during very time-consuming adjustments. "At first, we had a program so the robot could follow a wall by reading how far away it was," Schmidt explained, "but the robot was redesigned and we changed to using a gyro to detect what angle it's facing so it can drive in a straight line." When teams partner up, another set of standards becomes crucial. It's called "gracious professionalism." "On the field," said Wilson, "you want to help each other out. All the teams are friends, so you want to communicate and discuss strategy with them to earn the most points possible." Mentor Nilsen has a mechanical engineering degree from UCSD and works as a battalion chief for San Diego Fire-Rescue Department. He offers gentle suggestions and corrections as the students manipulate and adjust their robot. "My older son was interested in robotics," he said as the students checked the progress of charging batteries on his garage workbench. "When he was in eighth grade and his mentor left, I took the team on. This year's team is special to me, not only having my younger son on the team, but having them all around and seeing how much they enjoy this." Nilsen installed a lock box on his garage and provides keys to all team members, some of whom, such as Lee and Wilson, spend countless hours working even on weekends. The team named their robot "The Rise of Hephaestus" based on the Greek God "who built the first robot," according to Wilson. "The name changed from 'Sons of Hephaestus' when girls returned to the team several years ago." The competition is under the auspices of FIRST, an acronym of For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology, a nonprofit organization that began in 1989 and is based in Manchester, N.H. Today it has grown to include programs for all ages from kindergarten to high school that globally involves over 460,000 students, 52,000 teams, 40,000 robots and 230,000 mentors, coaches, judges and volunteers in 85 countries. Across the world, there are 3,400 teams with 85,000 participants at the grades 9-12 level. The organization also offers $50 million in scholarships to more than 1,500 students.
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    Donna Schmidt
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    March 20, 2017
    Congratulations FTC Team 4216 "Rise of Hephaestus". What a talented and dedicated group of high school students! You have worked tirelessly to advance to the World competition. Wish you the best in Houston!
    News
    Torrey Pines Gliderport searching for new operator
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    Published - Sunday, March 26
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