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    Bird Rock parade and Cove fireworks highlight La Jolla Fourth
    by DAVE SCHWAB
    Jun 29, 2016 | 2959 views | 0 0 comments | 5 5 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Girls having fun at last year's Bird Rock Fourth of July Parade on Beaumont Street. / Photo Sharon Hinckley
    Girls having fun at last year's Bird Rock Fourth of July Parade on Beaumont Street. / Photo Sharon Hinckley
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    Whether barbecuing, dining out, participating in or attending parades or fireworks is your thing this Fourth of July, La Jolla is the place for you. The Jewel, as the beach community is known, has every conceivable kind of diversion to entertain guests on Independence Day. Parade & festival The iconic Bird Rock Fourth of July Parade will march down Beaumont Street in the heart of the community for the 37th consecutive year. San Diego-based Murfey Construction, with brothers Scott and Russ Murfey, are sponsoring and coordinating this year's homespun parade bringing the event full circle with needed volunteers and donations. This year’s Beaumont Parade theme, “1980’s Rad BMX, Surf & Skate” will kick-off with registration at 9:15 a.m. on the holiday with a shotgun start at 10 a.m. For decades, hundreds of bikes and small floats have anchored this quintessential “small town” celebration spanning generations of La Jollans. “The Fourth of July parade is one of the things that defines this neighborhood,” said Russ Murfey. “For us, there is the obvious personal connection to the parade, but more importantly is what it means to the community as a whole.” Started in 1980 by Barbara and Buddy Murfey, Scott and Russ’ parents,  alongside other Bird Rock parents, the parade initially consisted of just a few Bird Rock families and grew exponentially year after year, now attracting nearly 5,000 participants.  This year, in addition to the parade, there will be plenty of food and activities including carnival games and photo booths at the end of the parade route in the Methodist Church parking lot. Despite moving full steam ahead, volunteers and donations are still needed. People interested in supporting the Bird Rock Fourth of July Parade can go to www.gofundme.com/2016birdrockparade to make an online donation. For questions or more information, contact Russ Murfey at russ@murfeyconstruction.com. Cove fireworks In another annual La Jolla Fourth of July tradition, a dazzling fireworks display can be viewed free from Ellen Browning Scripps Park for the 31st consecutive year. The approximately 25-minute Cove fireworks display will begin at 9 p.m. The annual extravaganza, begun originally by La Jolla restaurateur George Hauer, is now coordinated by the La Jolla Village Merchants Association Business Improvement District. Deborah Marengo, who organized the display for a few years after Hauer stepped away, continues in that capacity. Marengo credited LJVMA's executive director Sheila Fortune, and civic activist and former La Jolla Town Council president Darcy Ashley, for their role in “collecting donation money that can be written off in taxes. “They've been helpful getting word out (about fireworks) and keeping donors for at least five years,” said Marengo, noting all donations are important, no matter how big or small. “We've had people donating $1, $10 – whatever they could afford,” Marengo said adding, “It's really inspiring that so many people continue to donate because they're concerned about our community and our heritage here.” Supporting sponsors for the La Jolla Cove fireworks display are Hughes Marino, George's at the Cove, La Jolla Beach & Tennis Club, Duke's La Jolla, La Jolla Cove Suites, La Valencia Hotel, Willis Allen, Leo Loves Fireworks, J. Todd Figi, John Barbey and Steven Black. Cautioning that La Jolla's steadfast core group of fireworks donors “won't be around forever,” Marengo added it's important to continually be looking to expand the list of event supporters. And staging fireworks, with permitting, security and other costs, only gets more expensive each year. “When I started seven years ago the cost was about $40,000,” Marengo said. “Now it's in the range of $50,000 to $55,000 with more security and fencing required.” Marengo reminded fireworks attendees that Coast Boulevard will be closed to vehicular traffic starting at 5 p.m. on July 4. Independence Day dining Just a few suggestions, out of many possible throughout the Village, for dining/fireworks viewing on July 4: • Brockton Villa Restaurant, 1235 Coast Blvd.: One of La Jolla's best parties on the Fourth is at this restaurant from 6 to 9 p.m. overlooking the Cove. For $75 for adults, $25 for kids 12 and under, the Independence Day special includes a full dinner buffet, appetizers, dessert and non-alcoholic drinks. The holiday observance includes yard games, hourly raffle prizes, a photo station, great service and loads of fun. Attendance includes epic firework viewing all the way up the coast. For more information, call 858-454-7393. • The Marine Room, 2000 Spindrift Drive in La Jolla Shores: A true classic, bring your appetite to this oceanfront eatery that features, besides exquisite cuisine, a “High Tide Dinner” as the tide, quite literally, brings waves right up to the restaurant's picture windows. • George's at the Cove, 1250 Prospect St. in the Villlage: There's almost no better place to watch fireworks than from this three-story restaurant with an outdoor patio offering unparalleled views of La Jolla Cove and holiday pyrotechnics. Call 858-454-4244. • Duke's La Jolla, 1216 Prospect St. in the Village: Join this two-story, Hawaiian-inspired restaurant with outdoor dining and ocean views for the Fourth. Call 858-454-5888. • Eddie V's Prime Seafood, 1270 Prospect St. in the Village: You can't go wrong at this elegant, fine dining restaurant with a seafood and steak menu, cocktail lounge and incomparable ocean views that frequently features live jazz. • Nine-Ten Restaurant & Bar, 910 Prospect St. in the Village: This restaurant with chic, contemporary décor in the Grande Colonial Hotel offer inventive takes on seasonal cuisine. Call 858-964-5400.
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    Walking on water: 50 years on the Ocean Beach Pier
    by KAREN SCANLON
    Jun 28, 2016 | 8455 views | 0 0 comments | 7 7 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Pier under construction, before concrete roadway. / Photo courtesy of Leonard Teyssier
    Pier under construction, before concrete roadway. / Photo courtesy of Leonard Teyssier
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    Pier contractor Leonard Teyssier, 50 years after building the pier. / Photo by Karen Scanlon
    Pier contractor Leonard Teyssier, 50 years after building the pier. / Photo by Karen Scanlon
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    Pier advocate Chuck Bahde 50 years later. / Photo by Karen Scanlon
    Pier advocate Chuck Bahde 50 years later. / Photo by Karen Scanlon
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    People gather for the OB Pier’s Opening Day, July 2, 1966. / Photo by Steve Rowell
    People gather for the OB Pier’s Opening Day, July 2, 1966. / Photo by Steve Rowell
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    OB Pier under construction, café in place, north pier underway. / Photo by Steve Rowell
    OB Pier under construction, café in place, north pier underway. / Photo by Steve Rowell
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    Teyssier-designed, 80-ton crawler crane is lifted to pier, June 1965. / Photo courtesy of Leonard Teyssier
    Teyssier-designed, 80-ton crawler crane is lifted to pier, June 1965. / Photo courtesy of Leonard Teyssier
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    Mission Bay Bridge connecting communities of Mission Beach and Ocean Beach, 1915 to 1951. / Photo courtesy of Ocean Beach Historical Society
    Mission Bay Bridge connecting communities of Mission Beach and Ocean Beach, 1915 to 1951. / Photo courtesy of Ocean Beach Historical Society
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    Pier’s concrete roadway. / Photo courtesy of Leonard Teyssier
    Pier’s concrete roadway. / Photo courtesy of Leonard Teyssier
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    Aerial view of Del Monte Avenue steel pier, Always in a stage of construction, and never finished. / Photo courtesy of Ocean Beach Historical Society
    Aerial view of Del Monte Avenue steel pier, Always in a stage of construction, and never finished. / Photo courtesy of Ocean Beach Historical Society
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    For 50 years, people have walked the Ocean Beach Fishing Pier 30 feet above the Pacific for purpose and pleasure (mostly fishing). But the ocean view and dramatic sunsets make the pier a destination for hundreds of visitors annually. On July 2, Ocean Beach will celebrate the 50th anniversary of its iconic pier. Opening day festivities, on July 2, 1966, were celebrated amid a mighty commotion. Fanfare included a 40-minute parade down Voltaire Street led by grand marshal Mayor Frank Curran. Marching were the Marine Corps Recruit Depot Band and Color Guard, local dignitaries, bands about town, floats, beauty queens and representative service clubs. The Naval Training Center drill team, the San Diego High Steppers and the House of Scotland Junior Pipe Band joined in the pageantry. Newspapers noted that Gov. Pat Brown cut the ribbon and cast the first line. Carl Schroder, 85, and Councilman Ivor de Kirby served as masters of ceremonies. There were barbecues and sandcastle contests, angling and fishing competitions, band concerts, and a dance — each culminating with a fireworks display on July Fourth. At the time, 16-year-old OB resident and surfer Steve Rowell shot pictures of the opening day hoopla using a borrowed camera. Today, we view his revealing images with grateful nostalgia, including pictures of his favorite local band, The Insites, at the microphones and a crowd of some 7,000 celebrating the new pier. Before the big Pier Where there’s water, there’s fishing. Early native peoples devised clever means of taking fish from the bay and ocean using spears, arrows and nets. Generations of fishermen have since cast lines from shore. But the deeper water, where fish are more plentiful, required a boat or pier. Before there was an Ocean Beach Fishing Pier, an old fishing bridge linked the fledgling communities of Mission Beach and Ocean Beach. Built over layers of sand dunes in 1915, the 50-foot-wide roadway boasted two lanes for automobile traffic, a streetcar line and a sidewalk on either side for foot traffic and fishing. According to author Ruth Varney Held, in her book “Beach Town,” “perch, flounder, sea trout, bass, halibut and maybe sculpin” were caught. The old bridge, loved as it was, died a quiet death bit by weary bit. What remained was completely demolished in January of 1951, making way for modern routes to San Diego’s seaside communities. The people of Ocean Beach wanted a pier In the mid-1940s (by best estimate), a steel pier at the foot of Del Monte Avenue began to take shape and, though somewhat usable, seemed to always be in a stage of construction. Then World War II gobbled the steel needed to finish the pier. Some of its pilings remain visible in the surf today. There were other earlier and shorter docks or piers, including one about a block long (as noted in Held’s “Beach Town”), slightly north of the old 1913 Wonderland Amusement Park, according to OB resident Larry Toniiharu de Garcia. “There’s nothing left of it, only remnants in an old photo, but I remember talking to my friend Jimmy Lincoln about that pier. He’s gone now.” Another pier, or docklike structure, extended from Ocean Village into the inlet between Ocean and Mission beaches. As it was, no pier served the growing desires of the people in Ocean Beach. “The community was dying for a place to fish in the ocean,” says Isabel Clark, Ocean Beach MainStreet Association programs director. “In the early 1960s, an elderly OB resident who envisioned a pier, Carl Schroder, got things moving. He would become known as the father of the OB Pier. Schroder took his cause to the president of Peninsula Chamber of Commerce, Chuck Bahde: “Now look here, Chuck; my heart is in this pier, has been for a long, long time, but I’m too old to do this sort of thing. I want you to do me a favor: Get a pier built.” Bahde was a mover and shaker on the Peninsula. An industrial designer and promoter of community goodwill, he picked up the pier notion and drove it to the politicians. “Bob Wilson was a good friend of mine,” Bahde says. “I wanted to see what hoops we’d have to jump through with the city, state and federal government for funding the pier. And I had to be careful, ’cause I knew people got nervous about urban renewal when federal dollars come in.” So, with abundant support of his community, Bahde went to Sacramento and managed to secure funding from the State of California. The City of San Diego promised to match civic donations. With funding of $2.5 million in place, only three bids were considered for construction of the pier. Not your usual structural enterprise! Enter pier contractor Leonard Teyssier Leonard Teyssier sits at the dining table of his La Jolla home leafing through a folder of photos and newspaper clippings. He’s a genteel fellow. He served in the U.S. Navy then attended San Diego State University. In 1950, he formed a construction company with his father on Highland Avenue in National City. “I wanted to build big projects like my dad had done with Red Rocks Amphitheater in Colorado,” he said. Among many notable enterprises of Teyssier & Teyssier Inc. are a 40,000-square-foot Scripps Lab on the waterfront at La Playa (which has since been razed), All Hallows Catholic Church at Mt. Soledad and the 200,000-square-foot luxury apartments Le Rondelet in Point Loma, which he designed. Also, Teyssier raised the first outside glass elevator, installed at downtown’s El Cortez Hotel. The company contracted a number of structures with the U.S. Navy, including a tracking station on San Clemente Island, and a massive building for spray-painting five converted airplanes at once. But no triumph was quite so unusual as the Ocean Beach Fishing Pier. “We simply designed equipment to handle problems.” — Leonard Teyssier “Typically,” Teyssier smiles, “a pier is built in quiet bay waters using barges and heavy cranes. It’s fairly simple to build that way. But we had to build in rough surf and start at the shore and work our way out. It was so unconventional that we had to design our own tools and equipment.” There were private mental moments during which he wondered if he could actually do the job. Teyssier schemed an 80-ton crawler crane. This monster was mounted on an undercarriage with a set of tracks, called crawlers, to provide stability and mobility. The approved weight load of 120 pounds per square foot was critically calculated since the base between piles was 30 feet long and equipment would span pile head to pile head without overloading the deck. Piles, or pairs of hexagonal prestressed concrete beams, were drilled vertically into 30-inch diameter holes into bedrock under the surf. Each pile was set in 12 feet of concrete for durability of the pier. Platforms were created with concrete sections between piles. To span the deck, Teyssier and his crew constructed steel beam sections 24 inches deep, pile to pile, so they could “walk” the crane on steel deck. The crane would sit on the most recently completed bay and reach out to prepare the next bay. “We maintained the alignment of the pier to go straight out Niagara Street by setting a point on top of Narragansett Street a half mile away using a surveying instrument. It gave us alignment forward. Get out of alignment by a half mile, we’d look crooked pretty soon,” Teyssier chuckles. In midconstruction during the winter of 1965-66, an earthquake in Japan sent a tsunami to San Diego. Massive waves washed out three of the hammerhead piles and nearly took the crane. “I was in San Francisco at the time,” Teyssier recalls. “The city shut down the job, and my crew was wondering what to do. I caught a plane home and met them next morning. The inspector told us we couldn’t go out on the pier, but I knew if we didn’t go down and secure loose elements, we’d lose that pier. I told the inspector to write us a check for a million dollars or let us go out and inspect.” The pier design was modified with a “humpback” to accommodate large waves. Reaching 1,971 feet across the water, the pier end splits north and south, each 500 feet, forming a “T.” However, Teyssier explains that during construction, the citizens of Ocean Beach organized a committee to raise an additional $100,000 to extend the south pier. “Word came to me that they had that much money, and they didn’t ask how much pier that would get them. This was the most difficult part of the job, because it was in deep water, 30 or so feet, and the longest reach surface to floor. But you can bet I gave them their money’s worth!” Teyssier’s expression changes to a melancholy stare. “Once in a while,” he says, “I go out to the pier. I look at it and think about the people that liked it so much they raised money for a longer pier. I appreciate being the one permitted to build that marvelous addition, to actually build the whole thing for the people of Ocean Beach. It’s nice to be recognized today as the one who did!” Walking on water: No license required No fees and no license are required to fish from the pier. But initially, people complained that they weren’t catching fish. So Chuck Bahde went down to San Isidro and arranged for some old flattened cars to be dumped below the pier. “As I remember,” he says, “a couple of loaded pick-up trucks drove onto the pier, and a crane lowered the compressed cars to the water. They sank quickly.” This would create a fish habitat and increase the population. It worked! People have loved the pier 24/7 all year round. Seasonally, the number of people fishing varies, and so do the types of fish the ocean yields inshore, including topsmelt, mackerel, bass, perch, bonito, scorpionfish and halibut. OB resident and noted photographer Steve Rowell says, “In an El Nino, you can barely find a spot on the pier railings, ’cause the southern species of fish come up. Last year, three months of 90-degree weather and 75 degrees in the ocean, people were bringing up big game fish.” Midspan there’s a bait and tackle shop for renting poles and a café to fill your bellies. Local restaurateur Tom Ham operated the first café, then called The Sea Dawg. Today’s WOW Café manager, Chuck Fischer, will feed this year’s anniversary pier visitors. Philippines native Bo Reyes declares, “I like this pier; lots of room and easy access. I’ve been fishing from this place since 1974. Fishing is a good hobby, and if you catch anything, you’ve got something good to eat.” Clairemont resident Gina Yale has fished from the pier by putting a green pea on her hook for bait. “Yes, some fish will bite a pea!” she says. Chief pier engineer Greer Ferver, himself a fisherman, designed the width of the railings along the pier to allow surface for cutting bait. More important, the open railings Tessier shaped were intended to wash away in storm and high surf, lessening tension on the structure of the pier itself. Over the years, those railings have been replaced more than once. Grandstanding the World Surfing Championships Three months after opening day, the OB Pier was used for grandstanding at the 1966 World Surfing Championships when 200 surfers from 11 countries converged at Shelter Island to compete at Mission and Ocean beaches. Celebrated guests included Hawaii’s legendary surfers Kimo McVay and the mighty “Duke” Kahanomoku. Interestingly, when Chuck Bahde and community leader Billy Riley and her Peninsula Chamber of Commerce committee applied to the City of San Diego to host the event, city officials uttered distaste for the whole affair. Five years earlier, surfers had misbehaved during a similar bash in La Jolla, and the city was forced to consider the future of surfing in San Diego generally. Australian surfer Nat Young won the 1966 World Surfing Championships. It should be noted that surfers and spectators observed impeccable manners and gave the sport of surfing the facelift it needed. 50 Years on the OB Pier Ocean Beach Pier was closed for a hefty 14-month, $2 million renovation in 1990 and ’91. Pier users were not happy with the extended closure. Councilman Ron Roberts presided over the opening ceremony, and fishing resumed. Art shows, marriage proposals, memorials and other life celebrations are part of the pier’s history. The San Diego Junior Lifeguard Program has kids ages 7 to 17 jump from the pier as part of its ocean and wave education. You nonlifeguards can register to jump, too! Surfrider Foundation does a paddle for clean water around the longest cement pier on the West Coast every September. And OB Town Council hosts a pancake breakfast on the pier as a holiday fundraiser for food and toys. “This year’s OB Street Fair and Chili Cook-Off, on June 25, has a special area celebrating the pier’s 50th anniversary,” says MainStreet’s Isabel Clark. Don’t miss the OB Pier 50th Anniversary Art Show at Teeter, 5032 Niagara Ave., June 30 through July 31. Opening reception is Thursday, June 30 from 6 to 9 p.m. Finally, the OB Pier Anniversary Walk takes place July 2, commemorating 50 years, and on July Fourth, as always, fireworks to be sent skyward from the pier. ‘Father of the OB Pier’ lives his dream Contractor Leonard Teyssier says he rarely missed dinner with his family of eight children during the year and a half of building the OB Pier. “Standard procedure was that when I came in the door, we all sat down together at the dinner table. But one day I got home at 2. When I walked in, everybody sat down.” Teyssier laughed out loud, content. Schroder, father of the OB Pier, lived to celebrate a masterpiece for Ocean Beach. “I was so happy Carl was able to see the pier,” Chuck Bahde remembered. “He hugged me when it was all done. He thought, “I could do it, and I did!” OB Pier celebration The Ocean Beach Pier’s 50th Anniversary celebration will take place 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, July 2 at the pier, which opened on July 2, 1966. Special activities on the pier include: •    Pick up a free OB Pier postcard west of the Walking On Water Cafe on the pier. Supplies are limited – first come, first served. •    Have your postcard (or any other mail) marked with a Special Pictorial Cancellation by the United States Postal Service. They will have a temporary philatelic station (the “OB Pier 50th Anniversary Station”) west of the Walking On Water Cafe on the pier and our custom-designed postmark to mark all mail sent through them that day. Postage stamps will be available for purchase. •    OB Pier 50th Anniversary commemorative merchandise will be available for purchase west of the Walking On Water Cafe on the pier. •    Enjoy an historical display exploring the pier’s rich history and fun props to use while snapping a quick photo in front of a life-size backdrop of the pier opening in 1966 west of the Walking On Water Cafe on the pier. •    Free shuttles will be available to transport visitors from the pier entrance at the foot of Niagara Avenue to the end of the pier. •    A short ceremony honoring the pier with elected officials will take place 11 a.m. just outside the pier entry gates at the foot of Niagara Avenue. The Ocean Beach Community Foundation will be unveiling a new plaque at that location. •    The two gentlemen featured in our OB Pier oral history video – Leonard Teyssier, the contractor who built the pier, and Chuck Bahde, who served on Peninsulans Inc., which commissioned the pier – will be on hand from 1:30 to 2:30 p.m. to meet community members and answer questions about the pier. They will be west of the Walking On Water Cafe on the pier.
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    Families, fun and fireworks for Fourth of July
    by LAINIE FRASER
    Jun 27, 2016 | 3766 views | 0 0 comments | 3 3 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    The Big Bay Boom fireworks show goes off as seen from La Jolla Scenic Drive last year. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    The Big Bay Boom fireworks show goes off as seen from La Jolla Scenic Drive last year. / Photo by Thomas Melville
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    The beaches, bays and parks will be packed with thousands of visitors and residents grillin’ and chillin’ on Independence Day this Monday. But the culmination of a great Fourth of July weekend is finding a great spot to watch the tremendous fireworks shows. In San Diego, there are at least three major fireworks shows that can be seen from certain points in the area. Fireworks At 9 p.m. the annual Big Bay Boom July Fourth Fireworks Show kicks off. The fireworks are launched from barges around north San Diego Bay. The largest fireworks display in the county can be seen from various locations on the bay, Shelter Island, Harbor Island, Embarcadero and even down at Seaport Village. At 9:30 p.m. SeaWorld starts their Sea to Shining Sea Fourth of July Fireworks Show. The SeaWorld show and the Big Bay Boom can be seen from a variety of spots around the beach and bay. In Ocean Beach, at 9 p.m., fireworks will be launched off of the pier. Grab a blanket, find a spot and watch from the shore. As usual, picnics and beach days are always a good choice in San Diego and would be smart for Sunday in order to stakeout a spot for the fireworks displays. On the water, the Maritime Museum is offering dinner and fireworks on the bay this year. The observation deck from the historic Berkeley ferry provides a fantastic view of the Big Bay Boom fireworks show. Dinner will be provided and children are welcome. The Maritime Museum is also offering a separate experience aboard the Californian for those looking to get closer to the show. Tickets to both events include admission to the museum and exhibits. For more information and to purchase tickets, visit www.sdmaritime.org. For a beautiful sunset and a panoramic view of most of the fireworks shows Mount Soledad is a great option. Be sure to head up there early to find parking. Phantom fireworks would like to remind anyone using consumer fireworks that the explosions can scare both pets and veterans and to be aware and considerate. Beach & bikinis Throughout the holiday weekend there is plenty to do on and around the beach. At Miller’s Field in Pacific Beach there will be the first Queen of the Beach bikini contest. Miller’s Field is not known for traditional bar events so the bikini contest on July 3 starting at noon is sure to be fun. The winner will receive $500 cash and a beach cruiser. The second and third place finishers will also receive prizes. Email jon@millersfield.com to enter. The Local Pacific Beach, 809 Thomas Ave., is holding a lumpia eating contest 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, July 2. How fast can you eat 50 hand-rolled lumpia and chug a pint of Dos Equis lager beer? The maximum number of contestants is 32 and to register, visit thelocalpb.com. At SeaWorld, the park will have extended hours throughout the holiday weekend. This is part of the Summer Nights at SeaWorld event and means the fun can last just a little bit longer. Visitors who spend the Fourth at the park are able to stick around for the fireworks show that night. Whether you spend the day on the beach, bar hopping, at a park or exploring the city, San Diego has plenty to offer for the Fourth of July weekend and extravagant fireworks shows planned to top it all off. Morning cleanup The morning after thousands of residents and visitors played and relaxed on San Diego beaches there will be a mess to clean up. With this in mind, the Surfrider Foundation San Diego County Chapter will be leading the cleanup efforts and they’re asking the community to join them. On Tuesday, July 5, the Surfrider Foundation invites beachlovers of all ages to join in the Morning After Mess cleanup from 8 to 11 a.m. at one of the four hosted locations: Ocean Beach Pier and Oceanside Pier sites and partner organizations I Love A Clean San Diego and San Diego Coastkeeper at the Belmont Park and Crystal Pier sites. There is no need to pre-register, any participants under the age of 18 will need a parent or legal guardian present to sign for them. There will be snacks and the first 50 volunteers at each location will be offered a free hat. Last year, more than 650 volunteers removed 1,410 pounds of trash and 362 pounds of recycling from four local beaches in three hours. The trash included 489 plastic bags, 983 pieces of Styrofoam, and 14,796 cigarette butts.
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    Class of 2016 graduates from Mission Bay High
    by DAVE SCHWAB
    Jun 22, 2016 | 6388 views | 0 0 comments | 14 14 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Caps fly in the air as Mission Bay High's Class of 2016 graduates on Tuesday, June 21. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    Caps fly in the air as Mission Bay High's Class of 2016 graduates on Tuesday, June 21. / Photo by Thomas Melville
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    A near-capacity crowd turned out June 21 to witness Mission Bay High School's Class of 2016 graduate. Commencement exercises at the school's new stadium were infused with a fun and lighthearted spirit as MBHS seniors, in the words of principal Ernest Remillard, transformed into “alumni.” “I wanted to let you know how proud I am of each and every one of you,” said Remillard, who was also principle for some of the graduating class's seniors previously at Pacific Beach Middle School. “I am confident that they'll take their experiences and memories with them as they depart on their next journey.” Remillard thanked his staff personally for aiding him in helping “this terrific group of young men and women.” “Please remember: Always be respectful, and appreciate your life experiences,” Remillard counseled the graduating class. At the start of the ceremony ASB and class president Victoria Grabowski told the crowd she hoped the ceremony “wouldn't be too long or boring,” then sat down. “I actually thought that speech was going to be a little longer,” responded Remillard. “We are one big, truly happy family,” said senior class vice-president Donald (Ozzie) Osborne. He concluded with a quote from NFL Hall of Fame linebacker Ray Lewis who said, “Leave your mark to endure.” Co-valedictorians Hannah Bloom and Kyra Forsyth, as well as salutatorian Dan Tran, gave commencement speeches. Bloom, the captain of girls softball team who will be playing the sport in college, said the old adage that “the more things change, the more they stay the same,” doesn't apply to MBHS. “MBHS with its International Bacclaureate (IB) program and new sports complex is now the envy of all high schools in San Diego Unified School District,” said Bloom, citing all of her instructors for contributing to students' success noting, “They never get the credit they truly deserve.” Forsyth spoke about 10 “lessons” she'd learned at MBHS. Her list included being honest, having a positive attitude, trying not to procrastinate, not being afraid to ask for help and learning to prioritize. “No matter what you do, be you,” advised Forsyth, adding, “Don't listen to what other people tell you about you, because they aren't – and never will be – you.” Tran, whom principle Remillard referred to as “always having a smile on his face,” discussed procrastination. “Don't just wait around doing nothing until something happens,” Tran said. “You have to be proactive with your life.” SDUSD board president Dr. Michael McQuary accepted MBHS's Class of 2016 and put everything in perspective during his remarks. “There are 60 million students in K-12 schools in 27,000 high schools throughout the nation,” said McQuary, adding “there are six million students in California and 133,000 students in SDUSD in 25 high schools.” McQuary noted that MBHS's 2016 class of 215 graduates “are a big part of making a difference, not only in this community, city and state, but in the nation and the world.” The school board president noted this was a record-setting year at SDUSD pointing out the district, the second largest in the state, had a “92 percent average of all students graduating,” which he added is “the highest percentage of any urban high school in the state of California and the nation.” McQuary added the Class of 2016 was also exceptional given the diversity of SDUSD and the large number of English as a second language students which it enrolls.
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    Ocean Beach Street Fair and Chili Cook-Off set for June 25
    Jun 17, 2016 | 36139 views | 0 0 comments | 9 9 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Thousands will flock to Ocean Beach to enjoy food, drinks, chili, live music, art and great people watching at the 37th annual Ocean Beach Street Fair and Chili Cook-Off Festival on Saturday, June 25. / Photo by Jim Grant
    Thousands will flock to Ocean Beach to enjoy food, drinks, chili, live music, art and great people watching at the 37th annual Ocean Beach Street Fair and Chili Cook-Off Festival on Saturday, June 25. / Photo by Jim Grant
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    Thousands will flock to Ocean Beach to enjoy food, drinks, chili, live music, art and great people watching at the 37th annual Ocean Beach Street Fair and Chili Cook-Off Festival on Saturday, June 25. The free festival will include an oceanfront chili cook-off, vendor and food booths, Artists Alley, a beachside beer garden, live music and entertainment, family friendly activities, carnival rides and games, art, the Community Mural Project and more. The street fair will take place from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. in the 4800 to 5000 blocks of Newport Avenue, along the waterfront and in the pier parking lot, and along the cross streets of Newport Avenue at Bacon Street and Cable Street. Free trolley services will run for people parking near Robb Field (every 30 minutes) and on Sea World Drive at Pacific Coast Highway (every hour) from 9:30 a.m.to 9 p.m. There will also be a free bike valet at the intersection of Bacon Street and Newport Avenue, courtesy of the San Diego County Bicycle Coalition. The highlight of this year's fest will be the 50th anniversary celebration of the OB Pier, which opened on July 2, 1966. Ocean Beach MainStreet Association will commemorate the pier with photos dating back to its inception in 1966, and information about the OB Pier’s rich history in partnership with the Ocean Beach Historical Society. Other pier activities will include a kids fishing game, photo kiosk with a lifesize photo backdrop of the pier’s opening celebration in 1966, Living Coast Discovery Center’s interactive crab display and the opportunity to sign up for the San Diego Junior Lifeguard Foundation’s annual pier jump. The Kiss tribute band will be back to rally the crowd. This time they'll support the Year of the Pier by donning their ’60s surfer best and rocking out to the Beach Boys. Attendees can stop by Rock and Roll San Diego’s booth to get a free 15-minute music lesson alongside the wild and zany Kiss tribute band, as they’re dressed in full face painting with long hair and Hawaiian shirts. The booth will also have drawings, giveaways and loads of cool stuff. The chili competition will feature more than 20 tastings from amateur entrants competing for the titles of Hottest Chili, Judges’ Award and the grand prize winner: People’s Choice Award. Chili tastings will begin at 11 a.m. and will end when contestants run out of samples. Tastings can be purchased for $2 per chili entry, or attendees can buy a master ticket for $20 to try every recipe and vote for the best. The Hodad’s Burger-Eating Competition is back by popular demand offering contestants a chance to be featured on the Hodad’s Wall of Fame at its Ocean Beach site. The Bloody Mary competition will also make a return with 15 local restaurants and bars competing for the title of Best Bloody Mary in Ocean Beach. Tickets can be purchased for $20 to sample each entry and vote for your favorites. Children and adults of all ages are welcome to purchase a $10 square to contribute to this year’s Community Mural Project. Visit the mural area on Bacon Street just south of Newport to reserve and then paint your square. After the Street Fair, the murals are sealed and installed in the community. On Cable Street, Artists Alley will feature accomplished artists and their handcrafted items. Family-friendly attractions include the Wonderland Fun Zone in the parking lot adjacent to US Bank near Sunset Cliffs Boulevard and Newport Avenue. The Zone will have a 20-foot slide, OB Express Train Ride for the little ones, Zip Line, Zorb balls, Hop ’n’ Rock, laser tag, kids games and more. There will be five stages of nonstop music throughout the day. Music genres include acoustic, rock, blues, alternative, Americana and more. For more information, visit www.oceanbeachsandiego.com.
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