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    Judge rules in favor of UCSD, paving way for Che eviction
    Oct 21, 2014 | 7593 views | 0 0 comments | 12 12 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    A portrait of Karl Marx sits at the top of the Che Cafe's muraled exterior. An Oct. 21 eviction ruling may mean the Che will vacate as early as next week. COURTESY PHOTO
    A portrait of Karl Marx sits at the top of the Che Cafe's muraled exterior. An Oct. 21 eviction ruling may mean the Che will vacate as early as next week. COURTESY PHOTO
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    A San Diego Superior Court judge ruled in favor of UCSD Oct. 21 in the eviction hearing involving the campus landmark Che Café, saying the university owns the property and that the eviction notice it sent last summer was sufficient. Asked for a comment after court on Oct. 20, the music-venue collective’s lawyer, Bryan Pease, said Judge Katherine Bacal would issue a written notice of the decision to be delivered to the collective, after which the Che would have five days to vacate. He added that he thought it was likely the university would write that notice on Oct. 21 and that Bacal, who heard final arguments in the case on Oct. 16, could sign it later in the day. It's possible, Pease theorized, that the Che could be out of the site as early as next week. The Che was served with the eviction notice in June after allegedly losing its co-op status in a Graduate Student Association vote. The university terminated its month-to-month lease and gave the collective 30 days to vacate, which it failed to do. Pease told the court on Oct. 16 that the Che is challenging the association's vote to decertify the co-op, arguing that the governing master space agreement does not give them the authority to do so. He argued that, while the association can vote to certify, no authority to decertify had been granted to the body. Representatives from the co-op previously stated they believed they were in an extended holdover period after their term-specific lease expired in 2008 and had occupied the space on a month-to-month basis while lease negotiations took place. Pease told Bacal that the decertification vote was believed to be a way for the university to bypass dispute resolution and a chancellor’s review, which is why the collective proceeded to file a lawsuit. On Oct. 21, Bacal ruled that while dispute resolution is not required, it must be exercised for it to be enforced. She said the Che had the burden of proving that it sought dispute resolution but that there was no evidence that it had tried to obtain it. On Oct. 16, Pease addressed the issue of why the Che, despite being certified by the Associated Students and graduate student group, had not pursued an extension of its lease when it expired in 2008. “They’re students,” he said, “and they’re not as sophisticated as a savvy administration that was misleading them and providing contradictory information… and also, there are different entities within the master space agreement, which were the Associated Students and the Graduate Students Association, that are separate from the collective. So under the lease, it was actually those student governments that were supposed to initiate this process, or at least it was unclear who was supposed to initiate or how you were supposed to initiate it.” The university’s legal team, led by Daniel Park, argued that the collective made no effort to obtain its certification or initiate dispute resolution during the allotted ten-day period after the decertification vote. Furthermore, he said, the university was acting within its rights as a landlord with a tenant who had a month-to-month lease and that, in fact, no reason was required by law to evict the Che. Bacal ruled that the certification/decertification issues were irrelevant to the decision. The Che had filed a legal challenge to the graduate student resolution, but, with Bacal presiding over those proceedings as well, it's not clear that they will take place at all. The Che’s suit alleges that the university “colluded” with members of the graduate student group to decertify the collective, alleging that students were not given a reasonable opportunity to participate in decisions involving the survival of the venue. This is not the first time the Che has faced extinction. Pease said he believes the cafe faced an unlawful detainer suit in the 1990s and was saved by student action. On Oct. 21, a collective member said the latest ruling was not the end of the road for the Che and that the collective will continue to push to be part of the campus. The nonprofit collective opened in 1980 and has booked such high-profile acts as Nirvana, Jimmy Eat World, Billy Corgan, Bon Iver, Bright Eyes and Green Day and has been used as an art exhibit space and a restaurant. In 2012, it fell behind on its insurance payments and had to raise $12,000 immediately. – NBC San Diego
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    Here's a ghastly thought for Halloween
    Oct 17, 2014 | 8152 views | 0 0 comments | 3 3 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    MFP Image Format
    MFP Image Format
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    Some beasts, as you might imagine, are kindly sorts who only come out during the day and treat you accordingly. Most others, though, are mad at the world and would spook ya as soon as look at ya. You can find out which are which throughout history – and, if necessary, how to defeat them – at Monsters!, a Halloween-based exhibit opening Friday, Oct. 24, at the San Diego Museum of Man in Balboa Park. Yetis, manticores, leshies, even an old-fashioned dragon or two, like the one above – you and the kids can learn about them through sight and touch and interactivity as you explore monster caves and take in monster legends. The museum, located at 1350 El Prado, is open from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. seven days a week; admission ranges from $6 to $12.50 (children under 3 get in free). For more, see museumofman.org.
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    TOMS: A movement whose time has come
    by MARTIN JONES WESTLIN
    Oct 17, 2014 | 601 views | 0 0 comments | 3 3 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    TOMS' La Jolla shop, at 7802 Girard Ave., has lots to sell for several worthy causes. COURTESY PHOTO
    TOMS' La Jolla shop, at 7802 Girard Ave., has lots to sell for several worthy causes. COURTESY PHOTO
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    Now you see ‘em, now you don’t — the franchises that ply their trades for only part of the year hoping to eke out inroads into other locales. They’re the so-called pop-up businesses, whose stated intention is to appeal mostly to seasonal interests (Halloween costumes and gear, Fourth of July flags and clothes, Easter bunnies and chocolate peeps) before closing up shop and moving to another destination in the interest of the target cities’ economic development. It’s actually been going on since 1999, when an L.A. retail chain called Vacant sold a limited number of niche items and opened and closed several times in the process. That means Los Angeles has brought some pop-up experience to bear — in fact, one L.A. franchise is setting up shop in La Jolla, driven by the pay-it-forward climate the spirit of the season represents. TOMS is joining the neighborhood with its first pop-up “Give Shop,” which opened on Oct. 14 at 7802 Girard Ave. Shoes, optical frames, sunglasses and coffee are TOMS’ stock in trade, but charity is the motive behind each sale. Partial proceeds go to child welfare, compromised-vision programs and improvements in water-quality systems, in exchange for which customers receive credit for goods and services. They can also learn how to get involved through local volunteer opportunities, and they'll find an interactive “How I Give” chalk wall on which they can chart the ways they intend to give back. TOMS cites Nordstrom and Wounded Warriors among its business partners. “This idea about La Jolla goes back quite a few months,” TOMS' director of alternative retail Eshelman said, “when I was thinking where can we extend our store reach to a community that represents progressive thinkers, students and that target customer that buys a product with a purpose. We found quite a bit of support in La Jolla. La Jolla just reaches to downtown as well as North County. There's a proximity to UCSD also, so I think this is going to resonate. “We could have found a very commercial part of San Diego to locate in, but that's not the way TOMS wants to be presented.” The concept behind TOMS is easy to grasp, but it stems from an idea formulated on decidedly foreign soil. In 2006, American Blake Mycoskie befriended some children in a village in Argentina, discovering that they had no shoes. He founded TOMS almost on the spot and called his concept One on One, declaring that his fledgling firm would match every pair of shoes purchased with a pair of new shoes to be given to a child in need. Realizing that One for One could serve other global needs, Mycoskie launched TOMS Eyewear in 2011 to help restore sight to persons in need with every purchase of sunglasses and optical frames. Three years later, TOMS Roasting Co. launched, with the mission to provide clean water to developing communities with the purchase of premium coffee. “We have a reason for poppping up,” Eshelman said. “We're testing if we can make viable a unique social currency here. There's always a reason for a Halloween store popping up, sure, and there's a reason for the Christmas tree lot coming to town for a month. But we have a reason for coming to the community. We want to drive home our commitment to giving as well as engage people in a new, fresh way.” TOMS will host a variety of events through the holiday season, including craft nights, movie screenings, panels with TOMS marketplace designers and “instameets” with local charitable organizations. TOMS Give Shop will be open daily from 10 a.m to 7 p.m. until closing on Jan. 6, 2015. For more information, please contact Emily Tschirhart, the store's public relations manager,
at (424) 289-3634 or at emily.tschirhart@toms.com.
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    Regents Road flap is recast amid council study vote
    by SANDY LIPPE
    Oct 16, 2014 | 3353 views | 0 0 comments | 8 8 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Rose Canyon Open Space Park is a great place to walk the dog.
    Rose Canyon Open Space Park is a great place to walk the dog.
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    Debby Knight, head of Friends of Rose Canyon since the group's inception, doesn't drink or smoke cigars the way Civil War Gen. Ulysses Grant did, but she's leading the troops opposed to the bridge in Rose Canyon Open Space Park, a rugged University City venue between Regents Road and Genesee Avenue offering trails, wildlife views and bird watching. “I moved here in 1998,” she said. “I didn't know what a canyon was. I just wanted a place to run off the urban roads. Then I discovered the peace of the canyon, a wonderful natural place to get away. As a magazine writer on environmental places, the last thing I wanted to do was get tied down with community activism. I grew up in Bethany, Conn. and loved to play in the woods as a kid.” But one thing led to another, and the bridge issue – initially fueled in 1960, when the City of San Diego proposed a a bridge to link Regents Road southern and northern dead-ends – took form in 2002, when Friends of Rose Canyon was founded in Knight's living room. Since then, Knight has educated herself about canyons and watersheds in San Diego. She is paid a modest salary for her efforts and has brought many people to Rose Canyon, especially children. The latter come to the canyon to explore, pick up bugs and get a hands-on lesson in nature. Kids from Spreckels, Curie, Doyle, University City High School and several others are regular visitors. “When I grew up in Connecticut,” she said, “it was a time when you could go outdoors and feel safe.  I wanted that for San Diego children.” Volleys have been shot across the pro-bridge and anti-bridge trenches, and the war of words has been pretty straightforward. Proponents of the bridge formed U.C. Connection, a group of residents promised relief from traffic on Genesee and a second surface street evacuation route in the event of a catastrophe such as the 2003 Cedar fire, although UC has 805 and 52 available. In the opinion of Marcia Munn, UC Connection president, development in North University City continues at an alarming rate, and the proposed trolley stop will not benefit South University City: “It will be a magnet to attract traffic on Genesee.” In 2006, the City voted to certify an Environmental Impact Report on the project and build the bridge. The report took three years to complete at a cost of almost $3 million. Friends of Rose Canyon sued over the adequacy of the report, along with San Diego Coastkeeper, San Diego Audubon Society and Endangered Habitats League. In the settlement, the City agreed to withdraw certain essential elements of the report and agreed not to proceed without doing a new study. In 2007, with no report, the City voted to approve a contract for final design of the project, a violation of state environmental law. Friends of Rose Canyon sued again. The City put the contract on hold and eventually withdrew it in order to settle the lawsuit. When Councilmember Sherri Lightner got elected in 2008, she ran on a platform that opposed the bridge. In her opinion, the bridge would be an on-ramp for Route 52 and ruin the community as well as the canyon without providing traffic relief. She said she felt a fire station in South University City was the real answer for the community. Munn thinks Lightner has turned a deaf ear to anyone who wants the bridge. “In 2006,” Munn said, “the issue went to the City Council, resulting in a 6-2 vote in favor of the bridge. Three fire chiefs, starting with Jeff Bowman, have favored the bridge as the best safety measure for this community. A fire station would be a welcome safety trigger, but it would solve neither the evacuation problem nor the problem of reaching a medical facility when Genesee is blocked.” A few weeks ago, Mayor Kevin Faulconer held a press conference at the dead-end of Regents Road overlooking Rose Canyon Open Space Park. He talked about Regents Road improvements, with Lightner slated to announce his intention to take the bridge out of the community plan, along with the widening of Genesee. He's said he feels a South University City fire station is the answer. Meanwhile, Knight thinks the bridge's time has passed. “It is estimated to cost $35 million to build,” she said, “and the City would need to do (a new environmental impact report), and it is likely the bridge would not be able to meet today's strict environmental standards. The fire station would cost a lot less to build, and there would be money left for parks and libraries. We are in a completely different situation today than 50 years ago.” “Genesee is not congested except for peak hours in the morning going north and in the evening going south,” according to Knight. “The facts are seen in the 24-hour traffic count, which is flat. The count is the same as in 1987.” Knight is also working to get rid of the widening of Genesee in the community plan. Munn feels the negotiations to remove the bridge were carried out without input from U.C. Connection under a cloak of secrecy. “U.C. Connection was never told about the mayor's Sept. 25th press conference at the rim of Rose Canyon,” she said. “We represent hundreds of stakeholders.” At a Sept. 29 City Council meeting, at which around 100 people showed up to voice their support for and against the bridge, the City Council unanimously approved an amendment to the University City community plant to study taking the Rose Canyon bridge and the widening of Genesee Avenue out of the community plan. Hopefully, this latest controversy will end in 2014, but has defined the University City community for a long time. Still, Knight and Munn have been dedicated leaders of their troops, and the war of words may be winding down. Sandy Lippe regularly contributes her View from the 52 column to the San Diego Community Newspaper group.
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    Hangin' 20: Ricochet surfs La Jolla Shores on mission to save lives
    by DAVE SCHWAB
    Oct 16, 2014 | 670 views | 0 0 comments | 3 3 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Surfdog Ricochet counterbalances the board as Jacob Jumper (center) and Jacob Kilby take the ride of their lives. PHOTO BY RACHEL JONES
    Surfdog Ricochet counterbalances the board as Jacob Jumper (center) and Jacob Kilby take the ride of their lives. PHOTO BY RACHEL JONES
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    Two critically ill 19-year-old men, both named Jacob and both needing heart transplants, rode the waves at La Jolla Shores together along with acclaimed surfdog Ricochet Oct. 10 to make a statement. “What we’re doing today is to try to raise awareness for the need for organ donors,” said Judy Fridono, Ricochet’s owner, during a live morning TV news shoot. “This is a special story because of all the similarities between these two boys,” Fridono said. Jacob Kilby of San Diego underwent four open-heart surgeries between his birth in 1995 and his second birthday to try and correct the problem. But the attempts failed, and he was given 24 hours to live. Miraculously, he received a life-saving heart transplant at the last minute. Today, he finds himself needing a second heart transplant. Even though there are a lot of similarities with the Jacobs, there is one big difference: Jacob Jumper of Texas did not receive a heart transplant as a child. He grew up with an abundance of health issues, was often hospitalized and was never able to run around or play sports. “Growing up, the doctors told us in kid-friendly terms that Jacob was essentially born with half a heart,” said Jumper’s sister Hailey, who was present for his surf lesson. “For him to surf with Jacob Kilby and Ricochet is kind of like having a whole heart for the first time,” she added. Fridono said Ricochet, a female 6-year-old golden retriever, was “supposed to be a service dog but likes to chase critters.” Ricochet instead found her calling helping the disabled. “Now, she surfs with people who are disabled, counterbalances the board,” said Fridono. “She raises a lot of awareness.” Since the summer of 2009, she's won a kennel;s worth of awards and has brought in more than $300,000 toward causes to empower kids with special needs, people with disabilities, wounded warriors and veterans with PTSD. Both families contacted Ricochet for assistance within 24 hours of one another. A “Waves of the Heart” campaign was subsequently begun to help raise awareness of the boys' life-threatening situations and need for organ donors. It was decided to bring both Jacobs together, and sponsors paid for Jumper's plane fare and hotel room to make that happen. “This shows just how much an organ donation can do,” said Fridono, adding it’s especially important to get that word out to the general public. “One organ donation can save up to eight lives,” said Kilby, who’d never surfed with a dog or another transplant recipient. “You never know who your organs are going to, so it’s very important.” Asked if he was afraid to try surfing, Jumper said no, adding, “I’ve always wanted to try it. It seemed interesting to me.” Ever surfed with a dog? “Never,” said Jumper. “It sounds really fun, though.” Everybody was stoked after the event. “They were able to stand up on their first wave; that was surprising,” Fridono said. “The one Jacob (Jumper) held onto Ricochet and gave himself the confidence to stand up (while) holding on to her.” The problem for both boys involves an overwhelming shortage of donors. Each day, 18 people in the United States die while waiting for organ transplants. Every 13 minutes, another person's name is added to the waiting list of thousands already on it. Right now, more than 120,000 patients are waiting for a transplant in the United States. But both Jacobs have kept a positive attitude and were excited for their surf session. “I feel honored to have had this opportunity to surf with Ricochet and raise awareness about the need for organ donation at the same time,” said Jumper. For more information on Ricochet and on how you can donate, contact Fridono at pawinspired@aol.com or (707) 228-0679.
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    News
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