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    Mount Soledad cross undergoing facelift as Memorial Day fete nears
    Apr 25, 2016 | 10787 views | 0 0 comments | 3 3 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    La Jolla's Mount Soledad cross is getting spruced up in time for Memorial Day with the help of several local volunteers and companies that have donated their services. The 29-foot cross is in need of a good scrubbing and some fresh paint after years of wear and weathering, said Bob Mulrooney, executive director of Mount Soledad Veterans Memorial Association. The iconic symbol and its base, which anchors the Mt. Soledad National Veterans Memorial and has stood since 1954, will be water and sand blasted, patched and sanded before it is painted. The cross is currently covered with scaffolding in preparation for the work. “The memorial has become such an important part of the San Diego community, and we’re just delighted it will have a new shine to it for our annual Memorial Day event,” said Mulrooney. This year’s celebration, scheduled for May 20 at 2 p.m., will honor President Theodore Roosevelt, Keynote speaker will be Capt. Craig Clapperton, commanding officer of the aircraft carrier USS Theodore Roosevelt, which now calls San Diego its home. At least seven local companies have donated their services and expertise for the renovation. “This is just another example of the tremendous public support we have gotten,” Mulrooney said. The memorial honors 4,200 service members living and deceased from the Revolutionary War to the present and draws 70,000 visitors a year. The cross has been the subject of a decadeslong lawsuit between those who want to keep it at its current location and others who argued that a religious symbol on public land violated the separation between church and state. Last year, the federal government, which owned the land the cross sits on, sold the plot to the nonprofit Mt. Soledad Memorial Association. The deal is still under scrutiny.
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    Guillas steers the 75-year-old Marine Room into the next decade
    by TERRI STANLEY
    Apr 13, 2016 | 14363 views | 0 0 comments | 6 6 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    The peripatetic Bernard Guillas (left) and partner Ron Oliver have scoured the world in search of the tastes you enjoy. PHOTO CONTRIBUTED
    The peripatetic Bernard Guillas (left) and partner Ron Oliver have scoured the world in search of the tastes you enjoy. PHOTO CONTRIBUTED
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    In his book “So You Wanna Be a Chef,” Anthony Bourdain wrote that “If you’re 22, physically fit, hungry to learn and be better, I urge you to travel — as far and as widely as possible. Sleep on floors if you have to. Find out how other people live and eat and cook. Learn from them — wherever you go.” As executive chef at La Jolla’s Beach & Tennis Club, La Jolla Shores Hotel and Restaurant and the storied Marine Room for the last 21 years, Bernard Guillas is not 22, may argue that he is not so physically fit and probably hasn’t slept on a floor in years. But he is definitely still hungry to learn. He agrees with Bourdain—to be good, you have to travel. As in a long marriage, the secret sauce that makes his relationship with his clientele work is continued growth through new experiences. At the venerable Marine Room, celebrating its 75th anniversary this year with several events on Wednesday, April 27, that relationship has flourished because Guillas and his partner Ron Oliver have been traversing the globe for years to bring new ideas and variations of old ideas to the guests. Part of the Guillas strategy is to be multi-faceted, and he achieves this through teaching, writing and media appearances. He belongs to that group of chefs who have achieved a certain celebrity status, and he counts among his friends New York’s Daniel Boulud and Mario Bateli, who recently opened Babbo Pizzeria on Boston’s waterfront, and Boston chefs Lydia Shire, Jamie Bissonette, Andy Husbands and Jacky Robert, who, like Guillas, is a graduate of Maitres Cuisiniers de France. When Guillas found out that this writer recently moved to San Diego from Boston, his first question was, “How is my good friend Michael [Schlow] doing?” Like many of the leading chefs across the country, Guillas and Oliver have taken up the pen and written two books together, “Flying Pans, Two Chefs, One World” and more recently “Flying Pans, Two Chefs, One Sea.” Guillas laughs when he recounts the story of how the first book was published. “This book, ‘Flying Pans, Two Chefs, One World,’ nobody wanted to publish. Publishers were looking for chefs with syndicated shows. So my thought was I’ll publish it myself. Ron was concerned about the money, but I was not — we only live once; let’s share the love. The book won The People’s Choice Award: Best Cookbook in America. And after that, we had the publishers' attention, and they came calling for the next book.” Guillas is putting the finishing touches on his third project, a three-book series being handled by Simon & Schuster, geared toward teenagers. He is very closed-lipped about the subject matter, but he does let a few small details slip, such as that the stories involve saving the world, current events, travel, culture, magic and cuisine. The pace of the series is fast, and there are recipes after every chapter — all gluten and nut free — and, according to Guillas, very easy make. All the traveling, writing, teaching and media appearances feed into an important part of keeping his food ideas fresh, and Guillas believes that everything he does comes full circle. “When you look at it,” says Guillas, “all those things are connected — anything that brings attention to me brings attention to this property itself. The Marine Room is a restaurant that is always in motion. As Ron and I travel, we are always learning about new techniques and new ingredients. We incorporate them into the menus for our diners. In Korea, for example, there are a lot of similar ingredients, but they approach it very differently. There is a lot of pickling, so we tried that out, and now we do pickling in our kitchen because people love the pickling.” Guillas talks a lot about the evolution of food, but he also touches on the expansion of the Marine Room clientele, where that demographic is changing and how it will transfigure over the next 10 years. He still considers the Marine Room a local restaurant but sees the adventurous elements that he creates within the food going beyond local. Without a hint of boastfulness, Guillas sees himself as leading the charge in marketing the region, which he says benefits everyone. “Going forward,” says Guillas, “we are becoming much more global. The next ten years is going to be about the international clientele. You will find that 65 percent of our clientele is going to be Asian — we are continuing to develop strong relationships with Korea, China and Japan. Do you know why we will be successful? We have passion, and we work in our restaurants. We look outside the box because I have learned so much by traveling and Ron has done the same. It’s my passion. I still have three restaurants to run, but I am here — I am on the line.” For more on the Marine Room diamond jubilee, see marineroom.com.
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    'Coward' continues killing parrots in Ocean Beach
    by DAVE SCHWAB
    Apr 12, 2016 | 5422 views | 0 0 comments | 7 7 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    A wild parrot in an Ocean Beach tree. The San Diego Department of Animal Services has said it is actively investigating the ongoing series of OB parrot killings. Anyone with information in the case is urged to call (619) 692-4800. / Photo by Patty Sammuli
    A wild parrot in an Ocean Beach tree. The San Diego Department of Animal Services has said it is actively investigating the ongoing series of OB parrot killings. Anyone with information in the case is urged to call (619) 692-4800. / Photo by Patty Sammuli
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    Scattered reports continue of wild parrots being shot to death by pellets by an unknown assailant in Ocean Beach. Meanwhile, People For The Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) continues to offer a monetary reward for anyone with information leading to the arrest of the perpetrator(s). The nonprofit animal welfare group talked about the “psychology” of whoever the culprit(s) might be, while discussing what that means for the beach community. “Even if someone doesn't necessarily consider themselves to be an animal lover, I think everyone is concerned for the (Ocean Beach) community,” said Dan Carron, PETA's outreach coordinator, in the wake of the more than five birds killed during the past several weeks in the OB area. Carron offered this caveat about whoever is responsible for the recent bird slayings. “People who abuse animals rarely do so only once,” he said. “And a lot of them often go on to abuse more animals – and people in some instances. It's a great threat for everybody, and should be viewed as a community concern.” Reports on exactly how many birds have been felled varies, though Carron noted, “We keep getting multiple reports, different numbers, but it's absolutely more than a handful now, half a dozen, around there.” Carron added PETA continues to offer a $5,000 reward for information leading to whoever is responsible “being nabbed.” Speculation abounds that the parrot killer(s) are most likely juveniles living in the beach area. But that is uncertain. “The one thing we know for sure is that, whoever is doing this, is a coward,” Carron said. “It's the act of a bully who's taking out their personal issues and frustrations on defenseless birds, parrots.” Carron pointed out all of the slain birds did not die quickly – or painlessly. “In some cases, they're not dying right away,” he said. “Some of the parrots have suffered greatly before they died. One even died after it was taken in and given surgery.” The San Diego Department of Animal Services has said it is actively investigating the ongoing series of OB parrot killings. Anyone with information in the case is urged to call (619) 692-4800. Wild parrots survive on seeds, fruit and nectar from tropical trees and shrubs planted in urban and residential areas in communities like Ocean Beach, Point Loma, Pacific Beach and La Jolla. Parrots do not migrate, but stay in San Diego year-round. They have established communal roosts around the county that they return to each night. During the day, the birds will fly out to a variety of food sources, depending on the time of year. Not native to Southern California, the exact origin of the squawky, commonplace wild parrots widely seen throughout San Diego is a matter of conjecture. Some speculate the parrot population may have been contributed to by birds that escaped from the San Diego Zoo during its early days. Another theory is that parrots native to northern Mexico originally came to California in search of a suitable habitat as areas of Mexico became deforested. However they got here, exotic wild parrots have established themselves as a colorful addition to more than 500 species of birds found throughout San Diego County. For more information about animal abuse, visit peta.org.
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    Concours d'Elegance outdoes itself yet again
    Apr 11, 2016 | 3121 views | 0 0 comments | 3 3 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    SAMSUNG CAMERA PICTURES
    SAMSUNG CAMERA PICTURES
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    This 1939 Delahaye Type 165 Cabriolet represented France at the World's Fair the same year -- even so, these patrons of the La Jolla Concours d'Elegance, held April 8 to 10 at Ellen Browning Scripps Park, seem to have other attractions on their minds. And who can blame them? More than 300 fine-lined autos lined the grounds of the park for the 12th annual event, which has seen considerable growth since its beginning as a La Jolla Historical Society fundraiser. PHOTO BY HANNA LAUKKANEN
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    UC author brings closure to case of slain boy, 7
    by SANDY LIPPE
    Apr 11, 2016 | 1184 views | 0 0 comments | 2 2 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Author Sue Detisch always wanted to be a writer, so she became one. The first edition of her 'Rest Now, Beloved' ran 800 pages. PHOTO CONTRIBUTED
    Author Sue Detisch always wanted to be a writer, so she became one. The first edition of her 'Rest Now, Beloved' ran 800 pages. PHOTO CONTRIBUTED
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    Sue Detisch had just returned from Glen Abbey Memorial Park in Bonita, where she had placed a red rose on the grave of a 7-year-old boy she never met. She grieved his 1933 death as if he were her own. In a way, he is her own. Detisch, a University City resident and a former La Jolla High School English teacher, recently wrote and published a book based on the unsolved murder of young Christopher Abkhazian. “Rest Now, Beloved” bears her pseudonym, Blake S. Lee, as the author. Based on a true cold case in San Diego, this mismanaged murder case carried no closure for this child. “Every child who is victimized has to have his voice expressed,” Detisch said. “I had to be the voice to give this child closure, if not justice.” Christopher's death took place during the latter days of Prohibition in San Diego. Some said it was accidental; pathologists disagreed. The case gathered dust for over 60 years – and when forensic detectives reopened the investigation in 1990, they expect to put the case to rest – but this victim demands justice, not obscurity. Ex-policeman Pete McGraw, a chief detective in 1933, believes this investigation has been purposely mishandled and that there is a cover-up. From there, a reporter begins delving. As the truth unfolds, she steps on a land mine when she uncovers a dark and deadly family secret – a secret they would kill to keep buried. Detisch took a research history class at USD in 1990 and learned how to navigate archives and public domain. The instructor gave each grad student the name of a victim of a heinous local crime and had the student research places like newspapers, property zoning and birth records, the paper trail common to research before computer technology exploded. “Fifteen years went by,” she said – “and in 2005, I picked up the unfinished manuscript and dusted it off. It was 72 years after the unsolved murder when the sheriffs brought it out in 2005.” She smiled thoughtfully and whispered, “I always wanted to be a writer.” 1930s San Diego was an open city, where kids rode streetcars by themselves, went to the waterfront, the zoo, the airport. It was a city at a political crossroads. Some locals wanted it to stay a small town with family values. Others preferred it to become like Vegas, to pull in the money tourists were spending in Tijuana. There was also a revolving door for police chiefs. “I even visit with relatives of some charaxters who lived at the time,” Detisch said. “Some of the characters are a composite of many people who worked the case. I talked to the brother of a suspect and the sheriffs who had been around. You blur the lines between fiction and reality, sensitive to who lived then, distancing between real names.” At the Scripps Institute of Oceanography library, Detisch compared witness statements of 1933 with tidal records and weather reports. One suspect was broken and blind at the end of his life, but his memory and sensitivities were as fresh as if no time had passed. She also met witnesses who knew the victim and the suspects. The process of writing wasn't new to Detisch. “I had written three novels of various subjects and eventually put them into the closet,” she said. “My husband pushed me to publish this book.” After all, she had written each sentence 40 times. “You want to find the perfect word,” she smiled. “Rest Now, Beloved,” published last September by Createspace Independent Publishing Platform, had a first edition of 800 pages; the colloquialisms of the '30s had her turning to slang dictionaries. Detisch credits Lisa Wolff, her editor, with helping pare it to 400 pages; and finally, the published story is a readable 330 pages. “This book,” Detisch said, “is my child.” Meanwhile, she admits you need a muse to keep yourself motivated when you're on empty; “Other days, you can't write enough.” Trying to keep the voice in each of the characters was a challenge, editing over and over again. “I speak to a lot of book clubs,” Detisch continued. “One person asked me if I were the female protagonist, a U/T journalist in 1990 who dug into the case. No, I wasn't. You don't know where research is going to take you, just as you don't know where the writing will take you.” As someone said, “Writing is rewriting.” “Writing is a lonely occupation, too,” Detisch said. “When you are older, life gets in the way of writing; kids, husband, grandkids need your attention and time. You have to see the business side of it also. Getting a book published can be expensive.” “I did feel a catharsis once the book was finished, especially looking at the cover... a sense of pride. I had in mind a final cover with his resting place in black and white and a bright red rose. A sense of sadness washed over me, too. I felt impassioned by each of the characters. In hindsight, you look at their whole lives, and many died as tragically as they lived.” “Rest Now, Beloved” can be purchased at barnesandnoble.com and amazon.com in Kindle or paperback. Please check Detisch's Facebook page: “Rest Now Beloved.” Detisch will be speaking at University Community Library, 4155 Governor Drive, on Wednesday, June 8 at 2 p.m. She would be happy to speak to other book clubs about her book. Kirkus Reviews describes her writing as “engrossing prose rooted in specific detail that wonderfully evokes the setting of San Diego, both contemporary and historical.”
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    News
    Golf tourney to raise funds for Point Loma shooting victim
    “I walked a quarter mile in one hour and 15 minutes yesterday. A year and a half ago I could only walk 100 yards in that time,” said 23-year-old Will Barton in March. When Point Loma High School al...
    Apr 29, 2016 | 0 0 comments | 4 4 recommendations | email to a friend
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    Sports
    Ocean Beach Pier Surf Classic on April 30
    The inaugural Ocean Beach Pier Surf Classic, sponsored by Hodad’s OB, AWOL Productions and Revolt Surf, a local surf contest for ages young and old, will take place 7 a.m. Saturday, April 30. The e...
    Apr 14, 2016 | 0 0 comments | 4 4 recommendations | email to a friend
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    Opinion
    Younger boomers will pay dearly amid Congress' surreptitious act
    (Editor's note: David Reyes is founder of Reyes Financial Architecture of La Jolla, a registered investment advisory firm that acts as a fiduciary and specializes in portfolio risk management strat...
    Mar 18, 2016 | 0 0 comments | 5 5 recommendations | email to a friend
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    Arts & Entertainment
    La Jolla writer collaborates with Jane Austen as Mother’s Day nears
    The morning air at the Bennet household was loopy with the pungent scent of fresh teenagers, especially on Mother’s Day. The girls were predictably full of themselves, looking the other way at mom ...
    Apr 28, 2016 | 0 0 comments | 3 3 recommendations | email to a friend
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    Business
    Soroptimist International of La Jolla is ‘best for women’
    Soroptimist International of La Jolla is a nonprofit organization focused on helping women and girls with services running the gamut from resource for sexually abused women to recognition of high s...
    Apr 28, 2016 | 0 0 comments | 2 2 recommendations | email to a friend
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    Obituaries
    Gregory B. Anderson
    Greg Anderson passed away peacefully at home of congestive heart failure on March 17, 2016, just days shy of his 85th birthday, surrounded by his wife Eve and his children. Greg was born on March 2...
    Apr 18, 2016 | 0 0 comments | 3 3 recommendations | email to a friend
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