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    Heading back-to-school makes summer memories even sweeter
    by JENNY WERTH
    Aug 26, 2016 | 21662 views | 3 3 comments | 5 5 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    La Jolla High School cheer coach Cindee Russell and head senior captain Diana Dominguez hug-it-out.
    La Jolla High School cheer coach Cindee Russell and head senior captain Diana Dominguez hug-it-out.
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    Isabella Cohen, 11, has fun feeding the ducks on summer break. Bella enters Muirlands this year.
    Isabella Cohen, 11, has fun feeding the ducks on summer break. Bella enters Muirlands this year.
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    Karen Carlson and her son Nicolas Carlson. Nicolas starts       second grade at La Jolla Elementary this year.
    Karen Carlson and her son Nicolas Carlson. Nicolas starts second grade at La Jolla Elementary this year.
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    As summer vacation draws to a close La Jolla’s kids, tweens and teenagers are collectively enjoying their last few days of freedom. By next Monday, most parents will be back in the school grind. Students and parents from La Jolla Elementary, Muirlands Middle School and La Jolla High School all chime in on their favorite summer activities and thoughts on commencing a new school year. For many parents, back-to-school is a time of year when one can almost hear their neighbor silently counting down the minutes until that first school bell rings. “Summer is wonderful but it’s also a push to keep the kids busy... it’s like they become bored after a few hours! I’m ready for them to go back,” mused Tammy Marcus-Cohen. “I love to have the time with the kids, but it also means I’m ‘on’ full-time; and I already have a job.” Marcus-Cohen’s daughter, Isabella, 11, is transitioning into sixth grade at Muirlands Middle School after spending her elementary school years in Birdrock Elementary. She said she’s not happy in the least about summer coming to an end. “There’s too much homework in school. I do look forward to seeing my friends but I don’t like having six different periods of classes. It’s too much. I like having one class and that’s it.” Many students entering middle school have similar feelings about what will be a new system for them of moving from class to class in middle school. It’s not surprising since they’re accustomed to being taught by one teacher while in one class in elementary school. But, for Isabella, there are still a few days left of summer, and her tone became noticeably cheerier when questions of summer-fun came into play. Like many kids, Isabella enjoyed hanging out with her friends at the beach or the pool. However, her favorite activity this summer was her visit to the Great Wolf Lodge indoor water park resort located in Garden Grove. The waterpark is California’s only indoor water park with over 105,000 square feet of slides, rides and pools. “It was cool because it has really cool slides. There’s this one waterslide that you go inside of in this tube and the person touches the lever and then you go down the slide. It goes straight down and then (starts bending around).” Nicolas Carlson, who made sure it was understood that he was seven-and-a-half years old (not just seven) will be starting second grade at La Jolla Elementary School on Monday. When asked if he was excited to start school again his hand moved emphatically back and forth. “I kind of like school and I kind of like summer... it’s hard to tell which one I like more.” His summer included an assortment of activities and a few trips. “I like visiting my grandparents in Palm Springs. I like it there because they have this nice tram where you can go and look at the top of the mountain and see the whole Palm Spring’s village. It feels like you’re looking up from the heavens to me.” The awe-inspiring ride Nicolas mentioned is the idyllic Palm Springs Aerial Tramway which travels over two-and-one-half miles along Chino Canyon to the Mt. San Jacinto State Park at 8516 feet. But Nicolas also had fun while on solid ground. He said he enjoyed playing soccer at the park and engaging in a sword game called “Hunters” and “Dragon Slayers.” These are games that Nicolas and his buddies made up. Only seven-and-a-half and already creating games which could one day become competition to the fantasy footfall craze. He also had fun in his “favorite summer camp,” the Vacation Bible Study (VBS) held at the La Jolla Presbyterian Church. And here is his advice for kids who may be a bit nervous about starting school up again: “You shouldn’t be scared to be back in school because you get to play and learn a lot of stuff you couldn’t learn in camp unless you take a certain class where all you (do is) just learn and learn and learn.” Sound advice. His mother, Karen Carlson, said she feels it’s “bitter sweet” to see school start and summer end. “It is nice to enjoy a more relaxed pace over the summer and get away for a vacation. But, it is also fun for school to start because there are so many nice families at La Jolla Elementary School as well as the teachers and staff. It is a great community of people. It's always so lovely to see everyone again.” As for La Jolla High School varsity cheerleader team captain, Diana Dominguez, 17, summer found her spending a lot of time practicing with the team. And while the senior captain had a few vacation days visiting family in Guadalajara, Mexico, many of them were cheer-related sprinkled with some bonfires and days at the beach. Diana’s coaches and team members voted for her to be head captain of the team again this year. “It feels good to be leader of the team... I think it shows that your coach recognizes you and sees leadership in you. And it gives you confidence when you’re walking around the halls of school.” Head cheer coach Cindee Russell knows the importance of having a united team that respects what each team member brings to the field. And Russell has put valiant effort into coaching the team again this summer, including joining the team at UCSD’s National Cheerleaders Association (NCA) camp. “I thought the camp was incredibly beneficial for them. It taught the girls a lot, it challenged them and it made them overcome a lot of obstacles they had... they got a lot out of it.” Diana agrees with her coach. “You learn technique, skills and performance abilities in camp. They have actual coaches from the NCA who teach us and have been around for a long time.” All-in-all, Diana confirmed her summer was certainly busy. So, what is she not looking forward to this new school year? “My math class. It isn’t my favorite subject, but I’m looking forward to bonding with my team more and making the best out of it.” Come Monday, Aug. 29, La Jolla will have the familiar view of cars lining the sidewalks as students scurry in and out of school. Traffic will become a challenge and after-school-programs will start. Keep an eye out for students walking and bicycling ... remember, it’s not easy starting up school when the weather beckons one to the beach and even the ocean of Wind’Sea can be watched by students in both Muirlands and La Jolla High School.
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    Love22
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    August 30, 2016
    That kid be ugly just like u yo boy random stuff lalalal aka lakalaka
    Love22
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    August 30, 2016
    Like lol so tots lol all all singing in the shower is my jam lalalal whooooooooooooo hoooooooooooooooooooooô
    Love22
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    August 29, 2016
    Lol like love like you so sos is awesome lalala singing I'm awesome chacha seth. Sucks
    Thanks Rio! Summer Olympics were spectacular
    by JOSEPH CAPP
    Aug 25, 2016 | 17507 views | 0 0 comments | 8 8 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Opening ceremonies of the Summer Olympics. / Photo by Joe Capp
    Opening ceremonies of the Summer Olympics. / Photo by Joe Capp
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    Usain Bolt / Photo by Joe Capp
    Usain Bolt / Photo by Joe Capp
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    Brazilian fan enjoys an event. / Photo by Joe Capp
    Brazilian fan enjoys an event. / Photo by Joe Capp
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    Joe Capp looking patriotic.
    Joe Capp looking patriotic.
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    Team USA won the gold in Brazil. / Photo by Joe Capp
    Team USA won the gold in Brazil. / Photo by Joe Capp
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    The 2016 Summer Olympics turned out to be a smashing success – as I promised – and from my perspective, there were three overall winners. The USA The United States won 121 medals, 46 that were gold. Michael Phelps ended his storied career with 28 medals, the most by an Olympic athlete, 23 of which are gold! He easily goes down as the greatest swimmer of all time or as they say, he is the GOAT (greatest of all time!) Katie Ledecky, the 19-year-old phenom, started her career out in a Phelps kind of way, winning four golds and one silver in the five events in which she swam. She set the world record in the 800-meter final winning by a whopping 11 seconds of the second-place finisher, almost the entire length of the pool ahead! If she stays on track, she will grab the same moniker as Phelps in the near future. Another first-time Olympian already being touted as the GOAT is Simone Biles. The 19-year-old gymnast, who at 4 foot 8 inches tall was head and shoulders above the rest of the competition, also competed in five events, winning four golds and a bronze. Her routines were flawless and so difficult that most of her competition did not even attempt to perform them. Finally, in one of the last Olympic events of Rio, this writer’s personal favorite, men’s USA basketball won the gold medal with a commanding 99-66 victory, led by Golden State’s newest team member Kevin Durant and the New York Knicks Carmelo Anthony, all the while with me sitting court side, what a thrill! Brazil The host country, Brazil won a personal record 19 Olympic medals, seven of them gold. More importantly, or even the most significant of all events to have occurred, Brazil won the gold medal in soccer. Brazil is a country built on soccer. They are a people who live and breathe the very essence of the game. A people who went into mourning, an actual collective depression, after being embarrassed on their home soil in the 2014 World Cup against Germany, 7-1. This time they extracted a bit of revenge and took Germany through extended time to end in a 1-1 tie. It then went to a shoot-out. In the shoot-out both teams held side and the score arrived at 4-4 when Brazil’s goalkeeper, Weverton, finally dived and stopped Germany’s fifth and final kick leaving the door open for the Brazilian superstar, Neymar to come on and finish it. He had the last kick and he did not disappoint. He stutter-stepped and then smashed it through with great confidence giving Brazil their first Gold Medal in Olympic history. Beating Germany allowed Brazilians to hold their heads high again after the terrible loss only two years earlier. The Fans Everyone loved Rio. Everyone had a fantastic time and everyone got lucky because last minute tickets, for almost all events, were popping up everywhere and easily obtainable. Great seats sold for less than face value in the secondary market when they were not available on the official Olympic website. People snatched up these extra tickets and attended more events than originally planned. They ventured from a daytime gymnastic or swimming event on one side of town to a nighttime track and field event on the other. The lure of being able to go see a GOAT, like Phelps or Usain Bolt (who completed his triple-triple) for very little money turned out to be hard to pass up. Transportation to and from all the venues was smooth, fast, reliable and safe. The BRT transit, a newly opened extension of the metro service, a new tram and the local trains system got people around the city like clockwork. The new tram runs from the downtown train station though Olympic Boulevard to the local airport of Santos Dumont. Unfortunately, those who relied on taxis or Uber paid the price, automobile traffic stayed snarled for much of the time throughout the city. More than just the events, there was Olympic Boulevard, a once dilapidated area of downtown Rio (Centro) that was raised to make way for the games. City planners installed a beautiful new walking area on the wharf that runs down to the port area, connecting the Museu do Amanhã with the rest of Centro. They repurposed old warehouses to be Olympic-themed entertainment centers. For example, the NBA opened up a large exhibit where people could play games, shoot basketball both in real life for prizes or in virtual reality for fun, see and photograph themselves with the Larry Obrien Trophy and meet current and past NBA Legends. Gary Payton, Glen Rice, Bruce Bowen and even Carmelo Anthony showed up! The exhibit was free to the public and was open every day during the entire Olympics. Coca-Cola, as well as a few other big organizations, converted warehouses for exhibition space. And live music played all day, every day outside in the Praça! Every visitor experienced the friendliness of the Carioca, (the people of Rio) and both they and the city of Rio opened their arms and hearts, showing tremendous hospitality to countless grateful tourists. Admittedly, as a part-time Carioca myself, I may be biased, but I think these Olympic Games may go down in the record books as the best in modern times. We saw two GOATs retire (Phelps and Bolt), no crimes of any significance was reported (except one from a U.S. swimmer that turned out to be a hoax), no delays, problems, confrontations or any athletes getting sick because of the poor water quality. All in all, nothing bad occurred! And, as I predicted in this column months ago, the games turned out to be a huge success.
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    Adventures with Helene: Travel tips for backpacking on a budget
    by HELENE GERASIMCHUK
    Aug 18, 2016 | 41037 views | 0 0 comments | 10 10 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Helene backpacking on Makalawena Beach, Big Island Hawai'i.
    Helene backpacking on Makalawena Beach, Big Island Hawai'i.
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    Helene finding a backpack at REI in San Diego.
    Helene finding a backpack at REI in San Diego.
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    Hitchhiking in Pahoa, Big Island Hawai'i.
    Hitchhiking in Pahoa, Big Island Hawai'i.
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    Backpacking is an amazing option for the budget-conscious traveler. After backpacking through Hawaii, Australia, Indonesia, Malaysia, Singapore, and Thailand, I picked up on some travel tips that may help you prepare for your next adventure. There is a level of awe and wonder that comes with traveling to an unknown place. The more calculated and comfortable you feel in your day to day life, the more I encourage you to get out of your usual routine and take a trip somewhere random. 1) Make general plans but stay open to other possibilities. The best way to strike down opportunities for miraculous connections is by over-planning your trip. Tourist attractions are popular for a reason and some sites are admittedly must-sees, but there’s nothing like striking up conversation with a traveler or local who leads you to a secret epic spot. 2) Get familiar with plane ticket patterns. In general, ticket prices depend on the season demand. Try out skyscanner.com to get full coverage when comparing flights. Keep an open mind about travel routes, consider less popular airports, and use different modes of transportation. Also, rome2rio.com is a great resource to get you from A to B using buses, trains, and planes. The more open you and your timeline are, the more you open yourself up to the uncertainty of what you’ll do next. This is undoubtedly one of the biggest joys in traveling, which we often times lose in everyday life. Keep in mind that once you are on another continent, local flights become much cheaper. Flights within Southeast Asia start from $20 USD! In my experience, booking flights one week in advance gave me the perfect balance of keeping my travel route unpredictable while getting real-time suggestions from fellow travelers and following wherever life led me. 3) Pack efficiently. When your backpack becomes your temporary home, investing in a solid pack is essential. Understanding climate helps tremendously with planning. Online lists are the perfect resource to inform you on the must-haves depending on the nature of your trip. You will quickly become very conscious of what to bring when you consider that every item is extra weight you will carry. Opt for the headlamp over another outfit! 4) Consider cheap accommodation. Depending on the style of your trip, camping may be the perfect option. Many places offer permit-camping for a low rate. Make sure to prepare accordingly from padding to tents, hammocks, tarps, and all the gear in between. Couchsurfing.com is a common social experience in many countries, where hosts offer up short-term stays in their homes to fellow travelers. Hostels are also great options for short or long-term stays, with shared rooms and breakfast often included. Download the Hostelworld app to compare nearby options. Look into local options, as many countries in Southeast Asia offer homestays at an inexpensive rate. 5) Walk and talk! We are used to getting places quickly, but backpacking gives us a chance to slow down and experience. See where the streets take you, and chat with locals or fellow travelers. You never know where a seemingly wrong turn could lead you! 6) Link up with a travel buddy. While traveling alone is a huge opportunity for independence and growth, you can save a lot of money when you travel with another person. Split costs for housing, food, and activities. 7) Eat like the locals. Fresh markets and local vendors are a prime chance for you to experience local culture, and they are typically cheaper options than eating out at restaurants. If you have any additional questions on Backpacking on a Budget, feel free to email me at healthcoachhelene@gmail.com. Happy adventuring! Helene Gerasimchuk backpacked through seven countries in 10 months on a tight budget following her intuition over an itinerary. She is embracing life in Pacific Beach while she anticipates her next adventure. Contact her at healthcoachhelene@gmail.com for questions or inquiries.
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    Expert offers options on La Jolla Cove’s sea lions
    by DAVE SCHWAB
    Aug 12, 2016 | 18223 views | 0 0 comments | 4 4 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    People and pinnipeds enjoy the beach at La Jolla Cove. /  Photo By Thomas melville
    People and pinnipeds enjoy the beach at La Jolla Cove. / Photo By Thomas melville
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    A marine biologist who recently completed a study on sea lions and harbor seals in and around La Jolla Cove has concluded that deterring the marine mammals from coming ashore is going to be easier said than done. Dr. Doyle Hanan, of Hanan & Associates Inc., at the City of San Diego's request, recently submitted the results of his year-long research on local pinniped populations and their behavior. Hanan concluded that the “California sea lion populations and resulting interactions with humans are likely to increase over time.” In the Hanan study, observations of sea lions and their behavior were made from 10 sites around the Cove where the marine mammals haul out. The marine-mammal expert has subsequently offered several options to attempt to stem the unwanted presence of sea lions on La Jolla's cliffs and the Cove beach. Hanan noted his recommendations “all have advantages/disadvantages and varying costs for installation/maintenance.” Those options: • Use only NOAA-approved deterrence methods, i.e. non-lethal "boarding" to bar their way or spraying with hoses, etc. • Install gates and latches at access points. • Employ strong fencing as a deterrent. • Consider using low-voltage livestock fencing. In existence for 16 years, Hanan & Associates specializes in research on marine mammals and fish working on federal, private and commercial contracts. Concerning his recently completed Cove pinniped study, Hanan said, “It was a behavioral study. We were looking at the abundance of sea lions by season, sex and age.” Noting “no work had ever been done like this in La Jolla,” Hanan pointed out there were no (research) references to be had.” Hanan said the city was looking into potential solutions to sea lions and the problems they've brought – foul (cliff) smells from their waste, their pollution in the Cove where people swim and their increasing movement onto the beach displacing people and hampering lifeguards in performing their duties. Sea lion numbers, not only locally but all along the West Coast, have been rising for decades. Hanan noted that's been happening, in part, because they've been protected from being “taken” by federal law since the Marine Mammal Protection Act (MMPA) was passed in the '70s. Hanan expects pinnipeds numbers to continually grow until their carrying capacity, the number of animals that can be sustained by the available food supply, is reached. In his research report, Hanan also concluded that more than mere deterrence measures are needed to address the Cove's sea lion “issues.” “I suggested (public) education and increasing signage,” the marine-mammal expert said. “A lot of foreign people come here who don't know English. They don't realize these are wild animals and are taking selfies next to them or posing their children on or near them for pictures.” Concerning the prospects for success of any of the non-lethal deterrence methods he's advocated, Hanan pointed out sea lions are intelligent and “persistent” creatures quick to adapt to changing circumstances. Asked his view on the notion of using “rolling cylinders” strategically placed at cliff access points to deter sea lions coming ashore, Hanan replied it was a good idea in principle. But he cautioned that many more cylinders may be needed than anticipated noting, “you'd be surprised how well sea lions can climb and get around obstacles. “Some people are saying, 'Just bang some pots and pans and they will run,'” said Hanan, while pointing out it's not that easy. He added a variety of non-lethal deterrents have been used, to some degree of success, elsewhere along the West Coast.   “They work for awhile, but then the animals adapt and come back,” Hanan said. Whatever deterrence method(s) are eventually chosen to deal with the Cove's pinniped “explosion,” Hanan advises that more information is needed via research studies in order for the public and local government to make informed decisions on how best to deal with pinniped problems. “We need to figure out (exactly) what they're eating,” Hanan said, adding, for example, that in La Jolla, “They appear to be eating a lot of squid, when they're in season, coming from the deep canyons.” Hanan said the affects of El Niños and El Niñas, the cyclical warming and cooling of local ocean waters, also needs to be studied in much greater detail because temperature variation has a huge impact on how much – and what kind of – food is available to sustain La Jolla'a pinniped population. It also might not be a bad idea to study the possibility of some pathogens, like bacteria, which, though relatively rare, can be transmitted from pinnipeds to humans through mutual contact with the marine environment he added. “Fisherman have (historically) complained of 'seal finger,' a nasty bacteria that causes people's joints to freeze up and hurt,” Hanan noted. Hanan said he was uncertain what exactly will be done next with the information he has provided from his research study on the La Jolla pinniped population.
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    Nonprofits help homeless, struggle at finding solutions
    by JENNY WERTH
    Aug 12, 2016 | 11461 views | 0 0 comments | 7 7 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    The nonprofit So Others May Eat, founded by Mary, Star of the Sea parish member Tresha Souza, serves homeless at Mariner’s Point.
    The nonprofit So Others May Eat, founded by Mary, Star of the Sea parish member Tresha Souza, serves homeless at Mariner’s Point.
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    Melinda Price Silva and Leslie Furrier volunteer with So Others May Eat to feed the homeless in La Jolla.
    Melinda Price Silva and Leslie Furrier volunteer with So Others May Eat to feed the homeless in La Jolla.
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    The homeless, where should they go? If you were homeless, would you not want to live by the ocean? Should we all have access to public areas without discrimination? There are two sides to this question and both sides are equally passionate in their views. San Diego Homeless Awareness Day is Aug. 17, which brings the spotlight back on an issue that never ceases. Executive director of the La Jolla Village Merchants Association, Sheila S. Fortune, said she feels the homeless population in La Jolla has stayed the same since last year. She also noted the numerous ways La Jollans’ aid the homeless in La Jolla. “Our local community supports (the nonprofit program) So Others May Eat and an annual event So Fine on Kline all championed by Mary, Star of the Sea parish member Tresha Souza,” Fortune said. Indeed, Souza is a star advocate for the homeless; seemingly everyone in the community refers anything homeless-related to Souza. “I started So Others May Eat to show my children that not everyone lives (comfortably) like us,” Souza said. “Each homeless person is someone’s child. Even if we’re there to just hear their story, that helps.” Souza founded the So Others May Eat program in 2008 and has served thousands upon thousands of hot meals, in addition to donating pantry items from Mary, Star of the Sea Church. However, a fire in the church hall temporarily moved their efforts to Mariner’s Point where they are currently serving. But in September, the program will start up at the church again. Souza doesn’t think there are that many homeless in La Jolla, especially in comparison to the population found in other neighborhoods in San Diego. Additionally, she said she doesn’t feel her program attracts more homeless people to remain on the streets of La Jolla after the meals are served. Souza said helping the homeless has been a huge blessing in her life and that of her four children. She noted that her children are far better, more compassionate people because of their exposure to the plight of other people. She also said she feels there is a misconception of many homeless people. Each individual has their own story, but they shouldn’t be put into one group. “People look at the homeless and put stereotypes on them … they say they’re lazy, but there are wealthy people who are lazy too.” Mike Ramono has been homeless for two years. He said he lives in a secret shack around the Ocean Beach area. “It’s never easy to know if my shack will be safe at night, or if someone has taken my stuff. But, we (the homeless community) pretty much all know where to go to have a warm meal and get some friendly smiles.” He noted that the homeless tend to all be aware of the spots to eat and obtain snacks throughout the coastal communities of La Jolla, Pacific Beach and Ocean Beach. “In general, people aren’t that rude to us in La Jolla, they pretty much look the other way. Sometimes people give us money, other times they act like we don’t exist. I’m used to it by now. My plan is to head back to Vegas, but it’s so hot there in the summer,” Ramono said. He was part of the cleaning crew at the Venetian Hotel and Casino in Las Vegas for five years until he was “fired because they found out I had lost my apartment and said I had to have a permanent address to work there.” This situation is a common theme among the homeless. Most businesses won’t hire someone unless they can prove they have a permanent home address. Ramono explained this was the reason so many homeless people rely on having friends and family who will allow them to collect their mail at their address. “It’s a nightmare, you’re struggling to find a shower (or eat) and just get through the day, and then you can’t get a job because they know you’re not living anywhere … (how can we) try to get a place to live if we aren’t allowed to work without already having a home?” It’s a Catch-22 many homeless deal with every single day. However, Fortune said that in La Jolla, sometimes the more “known” homeless people are given a chance to work for locals. “Most of our homeless are ‘regulars’ and the locals know them; many feed them and offer employment if that is appropriate. I feel that our local homeless have been provided opportunities to get off the streets and this is their chosen lifestyle that we must respect,” Fortune said. Joe LaCava, a Bird Rock resident and former chair of the La Jolla Community Planning Association, said that “there are many reasons that individuals and families find themselves homeless. We must work collaboratively to find permanent housing through regional service providers. The mayor recently announced (that the) goal of housing homeless veterans must be extended to all homeless.” LaCava recognizes the immense good serving meals and providing clothing offers the homeless. “Who can argue with a good soul that provides a temporary respite or a warm meal? But those are stop-gap measures, we must focus on permanent housing. Affordable homes (subsidized housing for families with low and very low income) is part of the larger housing needs of our city. “However, for the homeless it must be more finely targeted to meet their unique needs. We need to offer them the stability of permanent housing combined with support services. With housing stability comes the opportunity for individuals and families to address health issues, have regular meals, and, find employment — all necessary to allow them to become self-sustaining.” Indeed, how to make the homeless become stable is a common theme. One that the San Diego Interfaith Housing Foundation (SDIHF) is trying to solve. The foundation offers two weeks of shelter in rotating churches for approximately nine weeks throughout San Diego. The program aims to allow low-income folks a safe place to live, shower facilities and hot meals while they try to secure permanent housing. This program is a life-line for many folks who are trying to transition back into mainstream life and find a permanent home. Something that is incredibly difficult to achieve while living on the streets. All Hallows Catholic Church, La Jolla Lutheran Church, La Jolla Presbyterian, St. James-by-the-Sea Episcopal church and La Jolla United Methodist Church have all been actively involved in this program. There are many programs and well-intentioned people who put their heart into helping the homeless, so why does it seem so little progress is reported? LaCava has an idea. “The City of San Diego struggles to address the homeless within our city because it has not been a priority. “There have been targeted efforts that should be applauded, but we as San Diegans have not committed to a sustained effort to address the several thousand that are homeless. The regular sweeps currently happening in downtown San Diego is the wrong approach.” Romano agrees with LaCava. “If people don’t want us to hang out at the park, or the beach, or the boardwalk or pretty much anywhere, but they also don’t want to offer affordable housing, then, tell me, where are we supposed to go? The trash bin? Would that be acceptable? Probably.”
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    News
    Mid-year report: Slight uptick in property, violent crimes
    Property crime went up by 4 percent countywide in the first half of 2016, compared to the same time period last year, while violent crime increased by 1 percent, according to the mid-year crime rep...
    Aug 31, 2016 | 0 0 comments | 2 2 recommendations | email to a friend
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    Sports
    LJHS basketball player and diver finds perspective in life
    Abby Ward can have a frozen, even frantic look on her face when she is madly trying to navigate a press applied by La Jolla High’s basketball opponents in the full court. Meanwhile, at the CIF divi...
    Aug 23, 2016 | 0 0 comments | 3 3 recommendations | email to a friend
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    Opinion
    Letter: Pacific Beach homelessness ‘expert’ missed some services
    The article in the latest Beach & Bay Press on homeless (Homeless expert: ‘Understanding, resources and leadership is needed’) lacks depth in many ways. While we appreciate the Beach & Bay Press br...
    Aug 15, 2016 | 1 1 comments | 4 4 recommendations | email to a friend
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    Arts & Entertainment
    Wave Goodbye to MS fundraiser in Ocean Beach
    At the age of 9, Point Loman Steve Bettis bought his first surfboard for $3. Starting then, he became one of those people who can't seem to find enough speed and excitement in life, an adrenaline z...
    Aug 30, 2016 | 0 0 comments | 6 6 recommendations | email to a friend
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    Business
    Pete knows luxury residential real estate sales
    Real estate is an art. And La Jolla Realtor Pete Middleton of Coldwell Banker Previews International is an artist. If you've seen his advertisement on bus stops, then you know that “Pete Knows Real...
    Aug 01, 2016 | 0 0 comments | 4 4 recommendations | email to a friend
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    Obituaries
    Longtime La Jolla REBA executive director Anna Galloway dies at 89
    Anna Galloway, the executive director and manager of the La Jolla Real Estate Brokers’ Association for decades beginning in 1968, and who retired in 2011 at the age of 89, died Sunday, July 10, at ...
    Jul 29, 2016 | 0 0 comments | 11 11 recommendations | email to a friend
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