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    Secret Garden Tour, set for May 16, is a nod to past and future
    by LINDA MARRONE
    Feb 27, 2015 | 4957 views | 0 0 comments | 2 2 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Linda Marrone's garden was featured in the 2001 Secret Garden Tour. PHOTO BY LINDA MARRONE
    Linda Marrone's garden was featured in the 2001 Secret Garden Tour. PHOTO BY LINDA MARRONE
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    What began as an idea a friend and I had over a cup of coffee has blossomed into an event we are pleased to say has become a perennial La Jolla favorite. Now in its 17th year, the Secret Garden Tour will take place on Saturday, May 16, to benefit the La Jolla Historical Society. My and Susan Vandendriesse's reason for starting the tour was to make people aware of the historical society's efforts to preserve our unique seaside community. Susan and I are honored to have been chosen this year's honorary chairs. Over the years, the tour has provided insight into horticulture and gardening and into the history of our community by showcasing a diverse selection of private gardens, their locales ranging from intimate historic cottages to grand estates that capture the community's timeless charm and casual elegance. Additionally, the tour has allowed us to share the many stories La Jolla residents have shared about the neighborhood's past and their efforts to preserve its charm and character for future generations to enjoy. We hope you will join us and celebrate spring by taking this rare opportunity to stroll behind the gates of cherished La Jolla gardens, where you will also be treated to artists painting garden scenes, live music and designers' stylish, entertaining displays. On the day of the tour, the Secret Garden Tour Boutique and Gift Faire will take place on the grounds of the society's Wisteria Cottage, 780 Prospect St. The faire, open to the public, will feature artisans and vendors selling a variety of garden-themed items. There are two styles of tours to choose from. The self-guided tour allows you to take the tour at your leisure in any order. The Platinum Tour is guided and includes brunch, shuttle service to the garden locations and access to an exclusive garden open only to Platinum Tour patrons.   Susan and I would like to thank the committee members and volunteers who have worked tirelessly, now and over the years, to make the tour the success it is today. We nurtured it as a seedling and are delighted to see how nicely it has grown and blossomed! More information about the tour can be found on the society's website, LaJollaHistory.org, or by calling (858) 459-5335. – Linda Marrone is a local Realtor with Coldwell Banker. Pictures of her garden have been featured in local and national magazines.
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    The art of science is alive at STEAMConnect
    Feb 26, 2015 | 2589 views | 0 0 comments | 1 1 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    STEAMConnect seeks to combine art, science and creativity in support of 21st-century innovation. COURTESY PHOTO
    STEAMConnect seeks to combine art, science and creativity in support of 21st-century innovation. COURTESY PHOTO
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    More than 500 educators, school administrators, nonprofits, parents, business leaders, funders and policymakers from around the U.S. who share a common interest in bridging the arts and STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) in education – two often siloed worlds – will convene in San Diego for the second annual STEAMConnect Ascend Conference Wednesday and Thursday, March 4 and 5, with La Jolla's UCSD Extension among its founding sponsors. Under this year’s theme, “Moving from Dialogue to Action,” conference attendees will share practices and new ideas about the impact of the STEAM movement on education policy, funding, industry innovation and the community. The full conference agenda is available at steamconnect.org/2015-sessions-booths-workshops/. STEAMConnect is designed to bridge the arts and STEM communities, providing space for connection and cross-sector collaboration through an annual conference, quarterly networking events and strategic partnerships. We share resources and best practices to our network of educators, nonprofits, business leaders and policymakers to support and further the STEM and STEAM movements nationwide. STEAMConnect was founded in 2012 by KDR PR and UCSD Extension and is a fiscally sponsored project of Mission Edge San Diego. On Wednesday, March 4, from 5:30 to 8 p.m., attendees, speakers, sponsors and community members will gather for a welcome reception to celebrate the start of STEAMConnect 2015 at SILO in Makers Quarter, 753 15th St. in the Upper East Village, a neighborhood anchored by artists, makers and entrepreneurs. On Thursday, March 5, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., attendees of the main conference will hear from 19 speakers, visit 11 spotlight booths featuring STEAM activities and resources and have the chance to experience three different hands-on workshops at Irwin M. Jacobs Qualcomm Hall, 5775 Morehouse Drive. Tickets are available at STEAMConnect.org. “There is an important window of opportunity in education right now to make real, substantive change,” said Kim Richards, co-founder of STEAMConnect and founder of KDR PR, a public relations firm serving the education community. “The change we’re focused on is how we can more thoughtfully combine arts, design and creativity with STEM knowledge to support our growth and innovation in the 21st century. The STEAMConnect conference provides a forum to hear from thought leaders, explore what’s working, share promising practices and make new connections.” Topics covered during the conference will include the latest policy efforts nationally and in California, case studies from pre-K-12 schools, researchers and postsecondary programs, cross-sector collaborations between business, school districts, higher education and nonprofits as well as perspectives from the funding community. The San Diego County Office of Education will offer two professional development workshops, and the Qualcomm Thinkabit Lab will be open for exploration throughout the day. STEAMConnect, in partnership with NewSchool of Architecture & Design, will unveil a student-designed pavilion as a focal point of the welcome reception that will become an annual student design competition. There will also be performances, local food and drinks and networking. Qualcomm Incorporated returns this year as conference site sponsor along with additional sponsors Boeing, Classroom of the Future Foundation, UCSD Extension, University of San Diego School of Leadership and Education Sciences, Academy of Our Lady of Peace and NewSchool of Architecture & Design. In-kind support comes from Sketch for Schools and PGK Dance Project.
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    March 1 open house planned as region's Prebys heart unit unveiled
    Feb 26, 2015 | 9188 views | 0 0 comments | 5 5 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    The new Prebys Cardiovascular Institute features six operating rooms for Scripps Health's 166 heart specialists. PHOTO FROM KPBS
    The new Prebys Cardiovascular Institute features six operating rooms for Scripps Health's 166 heart specialists. PHOTO FROM KPBS
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    Scripps Health, recognized as a leader in the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of disease, will hold an open house Sunday, March 1, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at its newly opened Prebys Cardiovascular Institute on the campus of Scripps Memorial Hospital La Jolla. The $456 million facility, which opened Feb. 26, brings together researchers, physicians, staff and technologies in the largest heart program in the region. “We designed this institute,” said Scripps president and CEO Chris van Gorder at the opening ceremonies, “to be centered around our patients and their needs, creating an innovative environment for collaboration among some of the nation’s most brilliant physicians, for ground-breaking research by world-class scientists and for the diagnosis and treatment of the most challenging heart conditions.” Scripps Hospital La Jolla is located at 9888 Genesee Avenue. The grand opening event included medical staff, volunteers, patients, donors and community leaders. “As one of San Diego County’s largest employers and a top innovative health system in the country, Scripps has long provided opportunities to countless San Diegans,” said San Diego Mayor Kevin Faulconer. “With the Prebys Cardiovascular Institute, Scripps has taken it a step further by building the most sophisticated heart hospital on the West Coast – right here in San Diego.” The 383,000-square-foot tower of glass, brick and steel, rising seven stories above Genesee Avenue, is named for Conrad Prebys, a real estate developer, philanthropist and Scripps donor whose $45 million gift helped create an institution designed to foster medical breakthroughs for decades to come. The new tower features 108 inpatient beds in private rooms, 59 intensive care beds, six state-of-the-art operating rooms and three advanced technology cardiac catheterization labs, with space to add three more. Work also has begun on a state-of-the-art emergency department on the ground floor of the hospital. The emergency unit is scheduled to open in June of 2016. “In business, and in philanthropy, I want to be involved in projects that make me want to jump up and down with enthusiasm,” said Prebys, whose $45 million donation to the institute was the largest he has ever made and the largest ever received by Scripps. “I’m overwhelmingly enthusiastic about this building because it symbolizes the caliber of expertise, technological advancement and care that patients receive throughout the Scripps system.” Each year, more than 76,000 patients receive cardiovascular care from Scripps, making it San Diego County’s, and California’s, largest heart care provider. For more than 30 years, Kaiser Permanente cardiologists have partnered with Scripps cardiovascular surgeons to care for Kaiser Permanente heart patients. “Building on a long history of working together, Kaiser Permanente and Scripps cardiac specialists will continue to offer the best heart care available to patients throughout the region through the Prebys Cardiovascular Institute,” said Kaiser Permanente Senior Vice President and Executive Director Jane Finley. Heart disease is the leading cause of death for both men and women in the United States, claiming about 600,000 lives each year and accounting for one in every four deaths, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. In San Diego County, nearly 4,000 people die of heart disease each year, according to the county Health and Human Services Agency. With 166 cardiovascular specialists, Scripps is the only heart care provider in the region consistently recognized by U.S. News & World Report as one of the best in the country. In 2014, US News ranked Scripps 18 in the nation, the highest rated program in San Diego County.
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    Scripps bids farewell to old reliable Melville
    by THOMAS MELVILLE
    Feb 24, 2015 | 6221 views | 0 0 comments | 5 5 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    R/V Melville docked at the Broadway Pier in downtown San Diego.
    R/V Melville docked at the Broadway Pier in downtown San Diego.
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    R/V Melville is named after Henry Wallace Melville, a pioneer Arctic explorer and an innovative U.S. Navy engineer who served in the early 1900s.
    R/V Melville is named after Henry Wallace Melville, a pioneer Arctic explorer and an innovative U.S. Navy engineer who served in the early 1900s.
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    Old ships, unlike old soldiers, don't just fade away, they're sold away, to foreign navies for more years of service, or to manufacturers for scrap. The fate of the research vessel Melville will likely be the same, but it had a long and fruitful life with Scripps Institution of Oceanography, which has retired the ship from its oceangoing fleet after 46 years of service. What can you say about a boat that has traveled more than 1.5 million nautical miles and seen everything? Is there a gold watch that could fit around it? Scripps decided to give R/V Melville a proper sendoff on Saturday at the Broadway Pier in downtown, to not only showcase its four decades of global ocean exploration by holding an open house for the public, but to give former crew members a chance to visit the vessel one more time. “I’ve been on about 80 expeditions over a career of almost 50 years but the two cruises on the R/V Melville were both unique and inspiring experiences,” said Bob Embley, a marine geologist/geophysicist with NOAA. The ship served the U.S. scientific community as a shared-use research vessel, which allowed access for scientists throughout the country. Melville was a jack-of-all-trades and master of them all – chemistry, physics, acoustics, geology, geophysics, atmospheric science, and biology. The global class ship compiled 391 research cruises since 1970, crossed the equator more than 90 times, and averaged 284 operational days per year. Oh yeah, it was also cut in half in the1980s. “We began planning for a midlife refit of Melville in the late ’80s,” said Bob Knox, physical oceanographer, and former head of Scripps Oceanography ship operations. “The propulsion system caused sound, which could interfere with sonar. It was decided the propulsion system had to be changed. But how?” A naval architect proposed cutting the ship in half and lengthening it by 34 feet, which would allow space for a new propulsion system. Scripps agreed. The ship was brought to the naval shipyard where a huge crane lifted it out of the water and put it on blocks. Then they pulled it apart, and through a precise process, added the new propulsion system. “It was an even better ship when it went back into service,” Knox said. R/V Melville often spent years away from San Diego, often working in remote and extreme conditions. In 1987, during the Helios I expedition in the south-central Pacific to trace deep flowing currents along the seafloor and to collect geological specimens, including volcanic rock, the ship traveled over an erupting undersea volcano, the MacDonald Seamount, previously thought to be extinct. “I was on the bridge and noticed that the water ahead looked like it was boiling,” said Eric Buck, Scripps Oceanography port captain and the former captain of Melville. “The ocean went from clear blue to looking like chocolate.” Buck called chief scientist Dr. Harmon Craig to the bridge, and Craig decided they needed to take samples. “We didn’t know if it was safe to take the ship into there, but we cautiously maneuvered into the area and were able to take samples for 24 hours,” Buck said. That night, the ship was hit by shock waves caused from collapsing steam bubbles generated from the volcanic eruption. “It sounded like someone was underneath the ship hitting the keel with a sledge hammer,” Buck said. Traveling over this volcanic hot spot enabled researchers to learn more about how islands are created and how old they are. R/V Melville took many similar expeditions as part of Scripps’s century-long history to fully explore the oceans for the benefit of society and the environment. But now it’s time to say goodbye. Scripps will remain as caretaker for Melville in San Diego while its owner (U.S. Navy) resolves the disposition of the ship. The Navy has offered the ship for foreign military sale and expects it to be sold later this year. The last major vessel retired from Scripps was R/V Thomas Washington, which was transferred to Chile, where it served for many more years as an oceanographic research vessel renamed R/V Vidal Gormaz. “I’ll always remember the remarkable research cruises I spent aboard Melville,” said Bruce Applegate, geologist, Scripps Oceanography associate director and head of ship operations. “It’s a terrific ship that had outstanding mariners and technicians.” R/V Melville Built: 1969 Length: 279 feet Owner: U.S. Navy
 Crew: 23 Science Party: 38 Endurance: 60 days
 -Named after Henry Wallace Melville, a pioneer Arctic explorer and an innovative U.S. Navy engineer who served in the early 1900s. -The oldest vessel in the U.S. academic research fleet, R/V Melville has served as one of the most capable general-purpose, global-class ships in the world.
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    Tutors as mentors: UCSD programs fuel both functions
    Feb 23, 2015 | 6135 views | 0 0 comments | 4 4 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    UCSD's mentor-students can use their experience to meet some college requirements. PHOTO BY ERIK JEPSEN
    UCSD's mentor-students can use their experience to meet some college requirements. PHOTO BY ERIK JEPSEN
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    A 10th-grader struggling with algebra, a teen from a military family, a high school student contemplating college and a homeless youth finding stability in the classroom — these are just a few examples of the underserved local students paired with UCSD undergraduate tutors through numerous initiatives. These programs, led by the department of education studies, the campus’s undergraduate colleges and others, allow UCSD students to serve as tutors, mentors and positive role models. Yet the undergraduates often find they learn just as much from their young partners. Partners at Learning One such initiative, the Partners at Learning program, offered by the department of education studies, enables students to actively engage with San Diego’s diverse communities and become powerful advocates for higher education. Designed as an immersive service-learning program, nearly 500 undergraduates participate each year, committing more than 40 hours or more in their assigned classroom each quarter. “This program is the reason I work in the early education field,” said Oliver LaPuebla, who was majoring in structural engineering when he began volunteering with Partners at Learning. “I felt energized through my experiences working with youth in the PAL program. I realized I looked forward to working with kids more than I had any eagerness to become an engineer.” Believing he could make a difference in children’s lives, LaPuebla enrolled in the Master of Education program at UCSD after completing his undergraduate degree. He now teaches preschoolers at a child development center in National City — the same school where he completed his program volunteer hours. LaPuebla is just one example of the undergraduate students who find the program's experience to be personally enlightening as well as impactful for local youth. UCSD students may use program courses to meet specific requirements for some of the university’s colleges or toward an education studies minor. Partnership Schools Program For students who are not education studies majors or minors, or who do not need Partners at Learning classes to satisfy college general education requirements, Thurgood Marshall College offers courses under its Partnership Schools Program. Working with UCSD’s Center for Research on Educational Equity, Assessment and Teaching Excellence, the college created the Partnership Schools Program to provide undergraduates the opportunity to volunteer at The Preuss School UCSD or Gompers Preparatory Academy as positive role models and mentors for grades 6 to 12 college-bound youth. “The Partnership Schools Program isn’t about satisfying GEs; it’s simply about giving back,” said Thurgood Marshall provost Allan Havis. “Thurgood Marshall College helps to mobilize UC San Diego students to volunteer at these charter schools. It’s about serving the community, and that’s what it means to be a true scholar.” Angela Fang, Partnership Schools Program student coordinator, added, “I think it is important that students take volunteering opportunities like the Partnership Schools Program because it gives them a much more realistic take on what life and education is actually like outside of campus.” Fang is a 2012 Preuss graduate and a former pupil of a Partnership Schools Program tutor. She credits this tutoring service as a big influence on her decision to take up the coordinator position. “What stood out to me the most during my time at the school,” she said, “was the dedication of our volunteers. I can’t begin to explain how eager each of the volunteers I encountered was! But there was a particular undergraduate student I met, named Jeff, who inspired me to develop my career path early on. He was very passionate about our class discussions, and he clearly showed that through the academic support he provided us.” The Partnership Schools Program student coordinator position, established in 2003, is funded by a grant from the Girard Foundation. Since the position was established, two Preuss graduates have filled the role. Muir College Academic Mentoring Program Muir College has launched its own tutoring service initiative as well. The Muir College Academic Mentoring Program is a collaboration between the educational equity research center's Early Academic Outreach Program, Muir College and UCSD's department of education studies. The program helps ready students for onsite academic advising and mentoring to students at Castle Park, Clairemont, Gompers Preparatory, San Diego high schools and King Chavez Academy. “In mentoring students, I was expecting to give my time and only receive gratitude in return, but what I received was so much more,” said Nico Salas, a program mentor at King-Chavez Community High School. “Through talking with the students, I have gained a great sense of empathy and have come to understand that every student is different and requires a different approach to their education… Though some are uncertain of their futures, all are eager to discover what possibilities await them after high school.” Eleanor Roosevelt College’s Math Tutor Corps Eleanor Roosevelt College’s Math Tutor Corps brings together several UCSD organizations to support math students at Lincoln High School. The program offers undergraduates a two-unit course that helps them learn how to tutor math from some of the county’s best high school math teachers. As part of the program, students serve as tutors for Lincoln High School students in math classes for at least four hours each week. Math Tutor Corps participants work primarily in algebra and intermediate algebra classes at Lincoln, courses where the greatest need for tutoring exists. “For Lincoln High School students, this individualized support has effects beyond simply helping them to excel in math – it helps them stay on track with their schoolwork, provides them an alternative environment to learn and motivates them to pursue a high school and college degree in the future,” said Eden Berdugo, program coordinator. The ERC/Monarch School Volunteer Program In addition, the ERC/Monarch School Volunteer Program gives ERC students the opportunity to volunteer at the Monarch School, a K-12 school in the San Diego Unified School District that serves the educational needs of homeless and at-risk children. Over the past five years, more than 30 ERC students have volunteered at Monarch, providing academic tutoring and work in after-school enrichment programs. Students in this program must commit to at least one academic quarter to reduce the level of flux and unpredictability that most of its students already have to confront on a daily basis. “I think the time commitment is absolutely worth it,” said past Monarch volunteer Karinne Caisse. “I am so pleased I could help those students discover the wonders of creativity and moreover be a person in the world who they know they could rely on and who cared for them. They impacted my life in a way I have never been touched before, and it helped me discover more about who I am, who I want to be and what I want to do with my life.” – UC San Diego News Center
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    News
    Peters unveils #FixCongressNow plan to curb government waste
    Democrat Congressman Scott Peters, a La Jolla resident whose 52nd Congressional District includes La Jolla, on Feb. 26 held an interactive telephone town hall to announce his #FixCongressNow plan, ...
    Feb 27, 2015 | 0 0 comments | 1 1 recommendations | email to a friend
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    Sports
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    Feb 17, 2015 | 0 0 comments | 4 4 recommendations | email to a friend
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    Feb 16, 2015 | 0 0 comments | 4 4 recommendations | email to a friend
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