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    Holiday parade features homage to century-old rec center
    Nov 26, 2014 | 3333 views | 0 0 comments | 1 1 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    The 57th annual La Jolla Christmas Parade & Holiday Festival, which draws thousands to the Village to glimpse bands, floats, equestrians, marching units, VIP vehicles, fire engines and a police antique paddy wagon and lifeguard boat, will kick off Sunday, Dec. 7 at 1:30 p.m. at Girard Avenue and Kline Street. This year’s parade theme is “Christmas Spirit – Peace on Earth.” The holiday festival, on the grounds of La Jolla Rec Center, at 615 Prospect St., follows the parade at 2:30 p.m. The festival includes stage entertainment, games, interactive learning activities and science and education exhibits. It ends with the lighting of the Christmas tree in front of the Rec Center at 5 p.m., on the eve of the rec center’s 100-year anniversary. The day’s activities begin with a flyover of vintage aircraft, courtesy of Bill Allen. The events are organized by the La Jolla Christmas Parade & Holiday Festival Foundation and run by a dedicated group of volunteers. Foundation president Ann Kerr Bache is the event organizer. “We are grateful to Jack McGrory and Bill Kellogg, honorary parade chairs, for their support and assistance making the parade possible,” Kerr Bache said in a release, adding, “Cindy Greatrex is festival chair, and Mike Carlin is our very able parade director, making sure once again that we have a well-run and safe parade.” Kerr Bache noted that the parade and festival is supported solely by community donations, with no public monies provided. She thanked John Barbey, the parade’s Gold Sponsor, “whose support early in the year made it possible to plan this year’s parade. “But we still need your support to keep the tradition alive,” said Kerr Bache, encouraging local residents to “join your friends and neighbors and donate today at ljparade.com.” Major parade sponsors include Audrey Geisel, Dr. Seuss Fund; Darlene Marcos Shiley; McGrory Family Fund of the Jewish Community Foundation; and LMC Management. “Please shop and support our local merchant sponsors — Adelaides, Warwicks, Bowers and others — who continue to support this village tradition,” Kerr Bache said. Donations in any amount can be made via ljparade.com using a credit card or PayPal accounts. A donation form can be found on the website, printed and mailed with a check or credit card information to La Jolla Christmas Parade & Holiday Festival, 1150 Silverado Ave., #212, La Jolla, CA. The foundation is a nonprofit, and all donations are fully tax deductible. Sponsorship benefits and opportunities are described on the event website along with a list of current sponsors and donors. Las Patronas has been selected as grand marshal of the 2014 Christmas Parade. They will serve as honorary marshals along with civic marshal Phyllis Minick, LJPB Beautification Committee; innovation marshal Greg McKee, CEO, CONNECT; and sports marshal Doug Fitzgerald, board chair of La Jolla Recreation Council. Military marshal is Steve Kappes, captain, Military Outreach Team, joined by the Wounded Warriors Tennis Camp. Concours d'Elegance is providing Classic Cars to carry the marshals down the parade route. Allen is providing a vintage truck painted a bright Christmas red. The Christmas tree has been specially pruned and will be decorated once again courtesy of La Jolla Sunrise Rotary. Pancho Dewhurst, GDC Construction, provides the crew and equipment to decorate the tree, continuing a Dewhurst family tradition. The rec center advisory board granted monies to the foundation and to the Rotary Club so that worn tree ornaments could be replaced. Laura McDonald, of Eloquence Designs, has designed special ornaments for the tree, which will be decorated Dec. 3. Volunteer opportunities are available for those who would like to learn how to run the parade and join in the fun on parade day. As always, No Parking zones have been established and are shown on the parking map on the website. This year, the first towing time is 9:30 a.m. – Staff and contribution
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    Rage once removed: UCSD protestors block I-5 in reaction to Ferguson decision
    Nov 26, 2014 | 715 views | 0 0 comments | 1 1 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    An aerial image shows part of the vehicle back-up along I-5 as protestors from UCSD block traffic near the Nobel Drive off-ramp on Nov. 26. The protestors were demonstrating against a Missouri grand jury's decision not to indict police officer Darren Wilson in the shooting death of a Ferguson, Mo. teenager. PHOTO FROM KFMB-TV, SAN DIEGO
    An aerial image shows part of the vehicle back-up along I-5 as protestors from UCSD block traffic near the Nobel Drive off-ramp on Nov. 26. The protestors were demonstrating against a Missouri grand jury's decision not to indict police officer Darren Wilson in the shooting death of a Ferguson, Mo. teenager. PHOTO FROM KFMB-TV, SAN DIEGO
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    Demonstrators protesting a grand jury decision not to indict a white police officer in the fatal shooting of a black Missouri teenager briefly shut down the northbound lanes of Interstate 5 near Nobel Drive in La Jolla early Nov. 26. The California Highway Patrol dispatch received a call of demonstrators in the traffic lanes of Interstate 5 northbound at Nobel Drive about 6:50 a.m. “...[P]atrol officers,” officer Jake Sanchez said, “responded swiftly to the scene and were able to get the roadway open in a timely manner. Demonstrators obeyed directions from officers immediately and left the freeway.” Sanchez warned that such protests pose a public safety threat. “Anytime pedestrians enter the freeway, they pose a serious risk of injury or death to themselves and to the motoring public,” he said. “We encourage citizens that are demonstrating to do it peacefully and safely to minimize injury to anyone.” According to broadcast reports, about 40 people took part in the protest, planned by the university's Black Student Union the night before. One unidentified man with a bullhorn purportedly urged protestors on while several carrying signs saying “Black lives matter” and “Hands up, don’t shoot” lined up across the freeway. The protestors were objecting to a Missouri grand jury's decision not to charge Officer Darren Wilson in the Aug. 9 Ferguson, Mo. shooting death of 18-year-old Michael Brown, who was unarmed but allegedly came at the officer and at one point tried to take his service weapon.
Moments before, Wilson had ordered Brown and a friend off a roadway and onto the sidewalk as they were walking. A news helicopter shot video footage of motorists on the gridlocked freeway leaving their vehicles to confront protestors, who reportedly had placed orange cones across the freeway, forcing vehicles to stop in all lanes and both shoulders, which made police access difficult. About 7:18 a.m., two dozen CHP patrol cars reportedly drove down an off-ramp onto freeway lanes and officers director protestors to leave, which they promptly did walking up the ramp to Nobel Drive dispersing toward UC San Diego. No one was arrested or cited by police, Sanchez said. The Nobel Drive off-ramp remained closed until about 9 a.m. The freeway was reopened a few minutes later. Similar protests shut down a freeway in City Heights Tuesday night. The protests came on the heels of another demonstration at UCSD. A few dozen students vowed Nov. 24 to continue to occupy the campus' Peterson lecture hall as part of ongoing protests against state system tuition increases recently approved by University of California regents. The regents last week approved a plan that will increase tuition by 5 percent each year for five years unless lawmakers in Sacramento substantially increase the system's budget. The hike would add $612 to the cost of attending a University of California school, increasing tuition to $12,804 for in-state students in the 2015-16 school year. Tuition would rise to $15,564 by fall of 2019 under the plan. That cost does not include local campus fees, books, room and meals. – Staff and contribution
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    Thanksgiving minus a century: The more things change...
    by MARTIN JONES WESTLIN
    Nov 26, 2014 | 321 views | 0 0 comments | 1 1 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    The landscape at La Jolla Cove was pretty desolate on Thanksgiving 1908, and not just because of the holiday. The neighborhood had only 800 or so people then, while today's legendary prosperity was a long, long way off – but people made do perfectly well, with a little help from their inner businessman. PHOTO COURTESY LA JOLLA HISTORICAL SOCIETY
    The landscape at La Jolla Cove was pretty desolate on Thanksgiving 1908, and not just because of the holiday. The neighborhood had only 800 or so people then, while today's legendary prosperity was a long, long way off – but people made do perfectly well, with a little help from their inner businessman. PHOTO COURTESY LA JOLLA HISTORICAL SOCIETY
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    Jethro Mitchell Swain's mama din' raise no Village idiot. The La Jolla chicken and fruit farmer made his mark as a savvy businessman too, at least among neighbors who caught wise to his sense of Thanksgiving one-upmanship. Sell your turkey and all the trimmings at a $4.50 profit, contenting yourself instead with chicken and sweet potatoes? Why not indeed! $4.50 in Swain's time is worth $103.83 to us, no small change among the workaday. And anyway, chickens are just as tasty as turkeys (for the record, they're also just as stupid). The La Jolla of Thanksgiving 1911 had a certain ring to it accordingly. Swain worked an acre east of La Jolla Boulevard he bought for a paltry $1,200 (one commercial real estate company wants that for two square feet now, in the same location), and the neighborhood population was about 850 versus today's 48,000. La Jolla hadn't the first clue it would later become one of this nation's most legendarily wealthy neighborhoods – and one of Swain's diaries shows as much, reflecting his holiday engorgement in the same light as that among the masses then and since. “Thursday, Nov. 30, 1911,” Swain wrote: “Thanksgiving Day, and we enjoyed it in great shape. We sold a turkey hot from the oven cooked to a charm for 4.50 cash. We ate chicken, sweet potatoes, cranberry sauce, cheese, pumpkin pie, beets, carrots & fresh ripe strawberries, pickle beets, honey, bread & sugar, tea, cream, were all satisfied.” The trick is that that $4.50 was well on its way to paying for Swain's meal and then some (a century ago, $6.39 would get you a 16-pound turkey, three pounds of sweet potatoes, a pound of cranberries, a can of peas, a can of pumpkin, a dozen eggs, a half-pound of butter, two cans of string beans, a gallon of cider, five pounds of flour and five pounds of sugar, if the ad flyers were to be believed). Swain also rejoiced in a lifelong asset named Alice (his wife, whom he affectionately called Pard) – you don't get to be Ellen Browning Scripps' dressmaker without some kind of commercial savvy, and Swain's diary constantly refers to Pard’s solitary trips downtown to do business on her own. Swain died in 1917 with his straight-shooter reputation intact – but he and Pard knew what was good for them, and their Thanksgivings were the better for it. Though the time and the place are vastly different, La Jolla’s still here, and the enterprising spirit of the world's Jethro Swains helps make the Village what it is. Carol Olten, historian and docent coordinator at the La Jolla Historical Society, contributed to this story.
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    Faulconer launches Do Your Homework @ the Library plan
    Nov 18, 2014 | 16535 views | 0 0 comments | 3 3 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Surrounded by Logan Elementary schoolchildren, Mayor Kevin Faulconer on Nov. 17 launched a citywide education program and announced a new non-profit organization, One San Diego, to promote opportunity and inclusion throughout San Diego’s diverse neighborhoods. A $30,000 contribution secured by One San Diego will fund 60 laptops for the city’s new Do Your Homework @ the Library after-school program for students from kindergarten to 8th grade. Faulconer and One San Diego board members presented laptops at the Logan Heights Branch Library. The donation is made possible by a $15,000 gift from the Walmart Foundation that was matched by the San Diego Public Library Foundation. “Your opportunity to succeed,” Faulconer said, “shouldn’t hinge on whether you live in a neighborhood north of Interstate 8 or south of it. As mayor, I’m working to bring people from all walks of life together to overcome our shared challenges, end the division and create what I’ve called One San Diego.” One San Diego is a nonprofit, nongovernmental organization designed to promote equal access to an enhanced quality of life and access to education initiatives. Its grant program give up to $2,500 to help fund these efforts. The city's 2015 budget funded the Do Your Homework @ the Library program, which provides one-on-one assistance to children for school-assigned homework at targeted kindergarten through 8th-grade schools. It adds a learning coordinator in 18 San Diego libraries where curriculum-aligned resources, technology and community partnerships work in tandem to support students. The program also capitalizes on San Diego public library equipment, staff, Wi-Fi access and digital resources, including the HelpNow! online tutoring program. The afterschool program has begun at the Central Library and four branches – Logan Heights, San Carlos, Pacific Beach/Taylor and Scripps Miramar Ranch. The program is scheduled to expand to 13 additional libraries in January. After years of service reductions, Faulconer’s inaugural One San Diego budget, passed last June, brought library hours to their highest levels in a decade.
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    Scripps researchers reveal technique behind anti-Ebola tool
    Nov 18, 2014 | 859 views | 0 0 comments | 1 1 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Biologist Erica Ollmann Saphire says Ebola images reveal the virus' presence.
    Biologist Erica Ollmann Saphire says Ebola images reveal the virus' presence.
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    An experimental drug created in San Diego and used to treat seven Ebola victims works by binding antibodies to the top and bottom of the virus, scientists at The Scripps Research Institute reported Monday, Nov. 17. In a study published online in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, researchers using an imaging technique called electron microscopy found that two drug antibodies attach themselves to the base of the virus, apparently keeping it from entering cells. ZMapp, made by Mapp Biopharmaceuticals in Sorrento Valley, was administered to the patients under emergency procedures, even though it has not been cleared for general use by federal regulators. Five of the seven patients survived, according to Scripps. “The structural images of Ebola virus are like enemy reconnaissance,'' said Erica Ollmann Saphire, a Scripps structural biologist. “They tell us exactly where to target antibodies or drugs.'' A ZMapp antibody also places itself on the top of the virus, possibly to serve as a beacon to call attention to the body's immune system that an infection is present, Scripps reported. The new research is among studies performed by the Viral Hemorrhagic Fever Immunotherapeutic Consortium, of which Scripps is a member. The consortium, funded by the National Institutes of Health, is testing antibodies from 25 laboratories around the world to develop the best drug cocktail for neutralizing Ebola and other related hemorrhagic fever viruses. The announcement from Scripps came the same day officials at a Nebraska hospital said a surgeon who contracted Ebola in Sierra Leone died despite receiving ZMapp as part of his treatment. Dr. Martin Salia, the chief medical officer and surgeon at the Kissy United Methodist Hospital in the African nation's capital of Freetown, arrived Saturday at Nebraska Medical Center in Omaha with hardly any kidney function. His condition worsened, and he died Nov. 17, according to the medical center. Salia is the second person to die of Ebola in the United States. More than 5,000 people have died of the disease in Sierra Leone, Guinea and Liberia. Officials at Scripps said the next step for the consortium is to study antibodies from human survivors of the current outbreak. Saphire, who leads the group, hopes they can also develop a back-up cocktail in case the virus mutates and becomes resistant to treatment. The Ebola virus has already undergone more than 300 genetic changes during the current outbreak, according to Scripps. Areas targeted by ZMapp are unaffected so far. According to Scripps, ZMapp will undergo clinical trials early next year. --Staff and contribution
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    News
    Temple Beth El ex-director reports to prison
    Eric Levine, former executive director of the Congregation Beth El synagogue in La Jolla, has reported to federal prison to start his 18-month sentence for embezzlement. Levine, 37, is now at the L...
    Nov 26, 2014 | 0 0 comments | 1 1 recommendations | email to a friend
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    Sports
    Frankie Puente: Dr. Jekyll is Mr. Hyde
    Frankie Puente is comfortable in his own skin, content with himself and with those around him—and not in a showy, “puffed-up” kind of way. One minute, he can talk about extending the hand of mercy ...
    Nov 26, 2014 | 0 0 comments | 1 1 recommendations | email to a friend
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    Opinion
    Swannson pool deficiencies hobble team efforts at UC High School
    Swanson Memorial Pool, built in 1975, sits on a small part of the 21.75 acres that make up Standley Park on Governor Drive in University City. Swanson is almost 40 years old, and, like a lot of 40-...
    Nov 26, 2014 | 0 0 comments | 1 1 recommendations | email to a friend
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    Arts & Entertainment
    Playhouse's 'Hunchback of Notre Dame' is for grown-ups
    Readers have until Sunday, Dec. 14 to hear and see the extended U.S. premiere of “The Hunchback of Notre Dame,” produced by La Jolla Playhouse in association with Disney Theatricals Group and the P...
    Nov 18, 2014 | 0 0 comments | 2 2 recommendations | email to a friend
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    Business
    Convention center turns 25; rough times ahead
    The San Diego Convention Center turned 25 on Nov. 25, having generated billions of dollars of economic impact. But challenges loom. According to the San Diego Convention Center Corp., the facility ...
    Nov 26, 2014 | 0 0 comments | 1 1 recommendations | email to a friend
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    Obituaries
    Ch. 8's Larry Himmel, former Comedy Store stand-up performer, dies at 68
    Larry Himmel, longtime journalist for KMFB-TV/Ch. 8 in San Diego and a former stand-up comic at La Jolla's Comedy Store, has died of cancer, the television station announced during its 11 p.m. news...
    Nov 11, 2014 | 0 0 comments | 3 3 recommendations | email to a friend
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