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    Faulconer pitches stepped-up, mandatory water-conservation measures for city
    by STAFF AND CONTRIBUTION
    Oct 08, 2014 | 37921 views | 0 0 comments | 87 87 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Scenes like this water fountain at Balboa Park may become far less common under proposed mandatory water conservation measures. If adopted by the full City Council, the new rules could take effect as soon as Nov. 1. 			    Courtesy photo
    Scenes like this water fountain at Balboa Park may become far less common under proposed mandatory water conservation measures. If adopted by the full City Council, the new rules could take effect as soon as Nov. 1. Courtesy photo
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    Mayor Kevin Faulconer is recommending the city moves to “drought-alert” status, the second phase of citywide water conservation calling for mandatory measures for all residents and businesses. The new measures would go into effect Nov. 1, pending City Council approval. “San Diegans have responded to the statewide drought by conserving water at impressive levels,” Faulconer said in an Oct. 7 statement. “Unfortunately, a record heat wave and a dwindling water supply require us to do even more. I am recommending to the City Council that San Diego adopt mandatory conservation measures to ensure that we all do our part to conserve as much water as possible.” In 2011, the city enacted permanent measures more stringent than those of most cities and water districts throughout the state. And on Faulconer's recommendation and with council approval, the city entered into a “drought-watch” status on July 1, 2014, calling for additional voluntary conservation measures in response to the statewide drought. Water usage in San Diego fell 4.4 percent in August and 5.7 percent in September compared with the same months a year ago. However, other factors, including a significant decline in ground water reserves throughout California, a drop in water reservoirs for the San Diego region, a lack of rainfall and diminished prospects for a strong El Niño and a severe heat wave for the San Diego region in August and September, led Faulconer to call for the second-phase status. Under the new guidelines, the voluntary measures in effect since July will become mandatory. They also call for the additional measures, pending council approval, to go into effect Nov. 1, to wit: • Watering and landscape irrigation using sprinklers will be limited to no more than three days a week on a schedule established and posted by the city. • Watering will be allowed at residences with odd-numbered addresses on Sundays, Tuesdays and Thursdays; watering will be allowed at residences with even-numbered addresses on Saturdays, Mondays and Wednesdays. Apartments, condominiums and businesses will be allowed to water on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays. • During the months of June through October, the watering limit is no more than 10 minutes per assigned day; during November through May, the watering limit is no more than 7 minutes per assigned day. • The washing of automobiles, trucks, trailers, airplanes and other types of transportation equipment is allowed only before before 10 a.m. or after 6 p.m. during the months of June through October and only before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m. during November through May. • Operation of ornamental fountains will be stopped except to the extent needed for maintenance. • Potted plants, noncommercial vegetable gardens and fruit trees may be irrigated on any day but only before 10 a.m. or after 6 p.m. during the months of June through October and only before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m. during November through May. • Use of water from fire hydrants will be limited to firefighting, meter installation by the Water Department or other activities necessary to maintain the health, safety and welfare of San Diegans. • Construction operations receiving water from a fire hydrant or water truck will not use water beyond normal construction activities. The city plans to enforce the new mandatory measures at no additional budgetary impact to water ratepayers. About 10 staff members in the Public Utilities Department will be tasked with enforcement, which largely calls for educating the public and working with residents and businesses to comply. The city will shift responsibilities for some workers and fill existing budgeted vacancies to ensure proper and adequate enforcement.
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    Ocean Beach Oktoberfest ready to blow your socks off with fall fun
    by BART MENDOZA
    Oct 08, 2014 | 1163 views | 0 0 comments | 3 3 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Competitors try to keep up their stamina during a stein-holding contest.            Photo by Paul Hansen
    Competitors try to keep up their stamina during a stein-holding contest. Photo by Paul Hansen
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    The OB Oktoberfest will be filled with the sights and sounds of the autumn festival, including the lively music of oompah bands. Photo by Jim Grant
    The OB Oktoberfest will be filled with the sights and sounds of the autumn festival, including the lively music of oompah bands. Photo by Jim Grant
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    The annual bratwurst-eating contest is always a fun one for spectators to watch, but participants should probably bring plenty of antacid. 				     Photo by Jim Grant
    The annual bratwurst-eating contest is always a fun one for spectators to watch, but participants should probably bring plenty of antacid. Photo by Jim Grant
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    A contestant lets one fly during a bratwurst-tossing contest at the OB Oktoberfest. Photo by Jim Grant
    A contestant lets one fly during a bratwurst-tossing contest at the OB Oktoberfest. Photo by Jim Grant
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    There are several options on the annual local calendar when it comes to celebrating Oktoberfest, but little compares with the party held each year in Ocean Beach. True, the events might have oompah bands, beer and sausages like other venues, but only Ocean Beach has its event right at the water’s edge. Located at the foot of Newport Avenue and Abbott Street, more than 7,000 people are expected to attend the 10th annual installment of the OB Oktoberfest. The two-day happening on Oct. 10 and 11 will include two stages of entertainment and contests galore for the crowd’s amusement. Now a local tradition, Ocean Beach MainStreet Association executive director Denny Knox is succinct when it comes to the reason for Oktoberfest’s success. “I don’t know of another one that’s right on the beach,” she said. She said she particularly enjoys the contests. “I think they’re hilarious. Everybody’s arms get really shaky [during the stein-holding contest]. It’s pretty funny,” she said. Saturday will feature beachside food and craft vendors, as well as a free all-ages stage on the grassy area at the foot of Newport Avenue, which will include performances from a traditional oompah Band, Lobster Bob and local music artists. Meanwhile, the beer garden stage will open the festivities on Friday night. There is a $3 donation and you must be 21 and up to enter the beer garden. On hand Friday night in the 21-and-up-only beer garden will be musical performers Brothers Gow, Electric Waste Band and Piracy Conspiracy. Saturday will feature host Jose Sinatra, plus sets from The Bavarian Beer Garden Band, The Rey Vinole Oktoberfest Orchestra, AJ Afroman, The Earful, Jet West, The Devastators, Todo Mundo and Vokab Kompany. Between the crowds and the setting, it’s a dream gig for most bands. “Playing outside provides a natural feel,” said Chris Warner of Jet West, which performs at 3 p.m. “It also doesn’t hurt to have a cool breeze hit ya when you’re playing a set.” AJ Froman, performing at 11 a.m., agrees. “There is nothing that compares to playing outside with the warm sun, cool breeze and amazing energy from thousands of people having fun outdoors.” He said his band will adapt its set for Oktoberfest. “We will cater our set to an all-ages crowd to ensure we are family friendly,” Froman said. Meanwhile, Todo Mundo frontman Santiago Orozco is more philosophical about the show. “We love playing outdoor events like this,” he said. “Ocean Beach is a beautiful community with lots of positive energy. An outdoor festival like this brings together the community, as well as great people from all over San Diego, and really amplifies that energy. It’s such a great feeling to share our music with a big crowd that’s having fun outside right next to the ocean.” Activities this year include the Miss Oktoberfest contest over both nights, with Saturday reserved for athletic competitions like the annual Brat Trot Run — which is an Ocean Beach Community Foundation fundraiser — as well as a 2K Family Fun Run at 9 a.m. and a traditional 5k Beach Run at 10 a.m. On the more humorous side, there will also be competitions in bratwurst-eating, balloon inflating, stein-holding and sausage-tossing. The latter should bring out a lot of competition. While most of the contests have a small cash prize to go with the bragging rights, tossing sausage into a tub and following the rules can net a winner $10,000. Also on the list of fun events will be “Find the Schnitzengruben,” a modern twist on a treasure hunt, in which 10 envelopes full of cash are hidden and participants are tweeted clues to their whereabouts. Shuttles to and from the event will be available on Friday and Saturday from the 710 Beach Club in Pacific Beach. Saturday will see the addition of shuttles to and from the Gaslamp District at The Local and in Normal Heights to and from the Rabbit Hole. Despite the event’s increasing popularity, don’t expect things to get much bigger. “We like the size that it is,” Knox said. “There’s space and enough bicycle racks and so on. It’s comfortable.”
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    OB’s iconic youth hostel changes hands, not mission
    by DAVE SCHWAB
    Oct 08, 2014 | 1398 views | 0 0 comments | 3 3 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    The Ocean Beach International Backpackers Hostel on Newport Avenue is always a source of curiosity and a mecca for young travelers from across the globe. The hostel’s ownership has changed hands, but its hospitality philosophy remains the same.  Photos by Dave Schwab
    The Ocean Beach International Backpackers Hostel on Newport Avenue is always a source of curiosity and a mecca for young travelers from across the globe. The hostel’s ownership has changed hands, but its hospitality philosophy remains the same. Photos by Dave Schwab
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    A look inside at the kitchen and amenities at the Ocean Beach International Backpackers Hostel, where young lodgers may stay for up to two weeks during their travels. The building is one of Ocean Beach’s oldest, rooted in its beginning as a hotel in 1909 after the streetcar line was built in OB.
    A look inside at the kitchen and amenities at the Ocean Beach International Backpackers Hostel, where young lodgers may stay for up to two weeks during their travels. The building is one of Ocean Beach’s oldest, rooted in its beginning as a hotel in 1909 after the streetcar line was built in OB.
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    MARIA MINOS
    MARIA MINOS
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    JACK McKEON
    JACK McKEON
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    The Ocean Beach youth hostel is under new ownership and management, but it’s business as usual at the establishment. One of OB’s oldest buildings, the Ocean Beach International Backpackers Hostel, at 4961 Newport Ave., was recently sold by immediate past owner John Asher to USA Hostels Inc. USA Hostels also operates hostels in San Diego’s Gaslamp Quarter, as well as in Hollywood and San Francisco. “[USA Hostels has] been in business for more than 20 years and we’ve been in the San Diego market for more than 20 years,” said Maria Minos, USA’s chief operating officer. “We’ve always wanted to get our hands on this hostel, so it was great timing that he (Asher) was ready to retire and move on to new things in his life,” she said. Asher could not be reached for comment. Minos said USA Hostels took over the local facility on Sept. 5 just before escrow closed on the building. “It was one of the first buildings here in Ocean Beach and was built in 1909 as The Pearl a few months after the streetcar line came in,” said Susan James of the Ocean Beach Historical Society. “It was a 20-room hotel and became the Newport Hotel in 1914.” James said the Newport Hotel was shuttered for a while when Asher bought it and reopened it as an international youth hostel in 1995. There isn’t much that’s garden variety about Ocean Beach International Backpackers Hostel aside from its youthful appeal. “We provide 24-hour security and guests cannot bring strangers in, even if it’s their brother,” said Minos, adding the hostel can accommodate about 100 people. “We have a lot of social activities that you don’t find in hostels or bed and breakfasts but do find in hotels and resorts,” she said. Hostel activities include trips to San Diego points of interest and Tijuana as well as trips outside the local area, like to Magic Mountain in the L.A. area. “This hostel will be offering a lot more in the way of activities,” promised Minos. She said changes may include the possibility of a name change. But she said that won’t happen immediately. Noting the OB hostel “still has a hotel license,” Minos said the business has 25 operating dorm-style, 4- and 6-bed rooms, some suites and some with shared restrooms. Minos said the hostel intends to build and expand on its solid foundation. “Eventually, we’ll have a van that will run guests between our two hostels and to different attractions around the area for free,” she said adding some remodeling is also in store. “We’ll be doing some spit and shine, repainting, new door locks and new bunk beds,” Minos said. “We have an exclusively designed bunk bed that we’ve developed ourselves that we’ll be installing. “We really like to keep the flavor of the local areas adding spices to the broth to make it even more a flavor of the neighborhood,” she said. There is a two-week limit on stays at the OB hostel. Minos said the hostel business is seasonal, like much of tourist-oriented San Diego. She said most hostels tend to draw visitors in their 20s and 30s, but she said Ocean Beach gets its fair share of 50-plus-age clients. “We get a lot of people who used to do hostelling in their 40s and older,” she said. “Beach hostels draw a majority of European travelers with a healthy sprinkling of Asian travelers.” The hostel COO said about 15 to 20 percent of OB hosteliers are from elsewhere in America, with the rest coming here from abroad. “The Irish invasion happens every June because Irish students are able to get working visas and come here looking for summer jobs,” Minos said. “We also get a lot of South Americans from Brazil and Argentina and Aussies (Australians) all year ’round because they’re always traveling. We also get a big influx of Chinese in December.” OB Hostel’s appeal for guests wherever they come from is pretty obvious. “We’re one of those vibrant beach communities in Southern California, and one of the few places in Southern California that really retains that true flavor of the Southern California beach town,” said hostel manager Jack McKeon. “Our location two blocks off the water is perfect for a lot of travelers.” McKeon spoke of two recent happy patrons. “We had a couple of Polish gentlemen come in last week and they were super-excited to go surfing for the first time,” he said. “We can provide that for people.” McKeon also pointed out that OB “has a lot of culture and vibrancy born out of the California counterculture movement,” which makes it more attractive to youthful guests. “Some call it the hippie hangover, but we think of it in more positive terms,” he said. The OB Hostel is strict about not allowing drinking from under-age guests or drug use of any kind. “If you’re caught (with drugs) — you’ll be kicked out,” said Minos. Minos said the OB Hostel’s new owners want to join with the neighborhood, which she said is a win-win both for the business and the community. “We’re just getting our hands around the community,” she said. “We were lucky enough to buy this hostel, and we’re really thrilled to be here.” Minos noted international travelers staying in relatively inexpensive hostel rooms make good guests for a number of reasons. “They’re on vacation, and a lot of them have saved a long time to be able to take these trips,” Minos said. “They save money on the room, so they have it to spend on everything else. They provide money coming into the community. We want to be able to contribute to that, bring in the right kind of clientele that will be spending that money.” For more information, visit www.usahostels.com.
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    After initial city gaffes, OB Elementary gets new permanent crosswalk
    by TONY de GARATE
    Oct 08, 2014 | 1924 views | 0 0 comments | 7 7 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Students, parents and safety advocates celebrated the permanent installment of a crosswalk at Ocean Beach Elementary School with a ribbon-cutting on Oct. 1. Holding scissors, from left, are: officer Amber Banning, principal Marco Drapeau, an unidentified student, District 2 City Councilman Ed Harris and parent Nicole Burgess. Photo by Tony de Garate
    Students, parents and safety advocates celebrated the permanent installment of a crosswalk at Ocean Beach Elementary School with a ribbon-cutting on Oct. 1. Holding scissors, from left, are: officer Amber Banning, principal Marco Drapeau, an unidentified student, District 2 City Councilman Ed Harris and parent Nicole Burgess. Photo by Tony de Garate
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    PARENTS, SCHOOL, COMMUNITY LEADERS FINALLY WIN CAMPAIGN FOR NEEDED SAFETY MEASURE There’s a new crosswalk at Ocean Beach Elementary — and this time, no one’s taking it away. The twisting, turning tale of the now-you-see-it, now-you-don’t crosswalk at Ocean Beach Elementary is finally over. And like a well-told story that precedes kindergarten naptime, the ending is happy and satisfying. Dozens of grateful parents, community leaders and citizens — as well as a few television camera crews — showed up bright and early to the official ribbon-cutting Oct. 1 of the mid-block crosswalk to observe the event. Most gathered to offer thanks to the group of volunteers who rallied community support to make it happen. And more than a few, undoubtedly, planned to cast a watchful eye to make sure this crosswalk — unlike the one it has replaced — stays right where it is. Ever so briefly, there was a crosswalk at the site several years ago in the middle of the 4700 block of Santa Monica Avenue, which allowed students to cross from the north side of the street to the 100-plus-year-old school on the south. It also connected two kindergarten classrooms on the north side to what those students call the “big school.” But, in an incident that could be a case study for bureaucratic gaffes, a city crew came back within days to undo the crosswalk and pour black paint on top of the yellow lines. City officials said they had no choice when someone realized the site lacked a streetlight, which by law must accompany a mid-block crosswalk. Public pressure finally paid off when the streetlight was installed in January, followed by a new crosswalk late in the school year. When he arrived on the job two years ago, school principal Marco Drapeau found the crosswalk was one of the first matters on the agenda. “There was a file this thick waiting for me in my office when I got here. We had a lot of people working on this a long time,” he said. Many of those people were on hand for the commemoration. There was Suzy Reid, a mother who serves in leadership roles on the school’s Site Governance Team and School Site Council, who succeeded in enlisting the support of the Ocean Beach Town Council last year. So was Nicole Burgess, a pedestrian-bicycling activist who helped secure a state grant to buy safety equipment for the crossing guards. It was also a special day for Joseph “Moondoggie” Piña, who stepped forward to volunteer as a crossing guard three years ago after the school canceled its Safety Patrol. (Students who used to work as crossing guards were deemed too young when the school changed to a kindergarten-through-fourth-grade configuration.) “I went to a meeting and asked why there weren't crossing guards, and (former principal) Maggie Johnson said, 'Oh, are you volunteering?’” Piña said. After a week of trying to control speeding cars, illegal U-turns and double parking, Piña had second thoughts. “They just issued me a vest and put me out there. It was total chaos. I was out here getting run over. I didn’t want to come back the next week,” he said. Just when his morale was at an ebb, a second volunteer — Wayne Simard – stepped forward, and the two realized they made a good team. “He’s the good cop, I’m the bad cop,” Simard said. “He was like, ‘We have to be friendly. Use the nice voice.’ I’m like, ‘I’m from Boston. Don’t mess with me.’” Since then, other volunteers — Joe Grau, Julie Frieburger, Matt Wood, Caleb Webb and Jack Shaw — have stepped forward, but Piña and Simard are the two who maintain the highest visibility. “It’s very important to listen to Moondoggie and Mr. Wayne,” police officer Amber Banning said at morning assembly. “They are out here to keep you safe.”
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    Point Loma’s link to legendary rockers Chicago to return home for local gig
    by BART MENDOZA
    Oct 08, 2014 | 2324 views | 0 0 comments | 15 15 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Jason Scheff (top row, center in tan), a former Point Loman who went on to stake his claim to fame as singer and bassist for the legendary classic rockers Chicago, will have a homecoming of sorts on Oct. 12, performing a one-off gig at Lestat’s Coffeehouse on Adams Avenue. 						                         Courtesy photo
    Jason Scheff (top row, center in tan), a former Point Loman who went on to stake his claim to fame as singer and bassist for the legendary classic rockers Chicago, will have a homecoming of sorts on Oct. 12, performing a one-off gig at Lestat’s Coffeehouse on Adams Avenue. Courtesy photo
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    Former Point Loma resident and bassist Jason Scheff returns to San Diego for a rare one-off show on Oct. 12 at Lestat’s Coffeehouse. Best known as singer and bassist for the legendary classic rockers Chicago, he’s also part of the legendary Point Loma-based Scheff family of musicians, which includes father Jerry, a legend for his work with Elvis Presley and the Doors, as well as Jason’s brother, Lauren, who performs with award-winning local indie rocker Kevin Martin and Get Back Loretta. Jason Scheff joined Chicago hitmakers in September 1985, scoring an instant hit with “Will You Still Love Me?”, which rose to No. 3 in the charts in 1986. This was followed by 10 more chart entries from Chicago, including “Look Away” (No. 1 in 1988). The band is currently touring behind its recent album, “Chicago 36 — Now,” but this special gig is apart from that. It’s a chance for Scheff, who today calls Nashville home, to get back to his Point Loma roots. The reason for the gig comes down to family. “My brother, Lauren, has such a great presence down in San Diego and been working with a lot of local talent for several years and nurturing a great scene,” Scheff said during a tour stop in Daytona, Fla. “I was going to be finishing up some dates of a Chicago tour in San Diego, so he asked me if I wanted to stick around and we could just do a gig together. I thought, ‘What a great idea. I could tap into this great talent pool that he’s involved with.’” On hand will be the likes of keyboardist Kevin Martin, drummer Duncan Moore and percussionist Bob Sale. ”It’s turning into a really fun reunion of sorts, but it’s also about getting together with my brother and parlaying everything that we’ve worked for into a set,” said Scheff. The plan is for a list of choice covers, but don’t expect the obvious. “It’s pretty much all covers, songs by Elton John and Earth, Wind & Fire, that sort of thing. We’re going back to my roots, playing songs I heard when I was growing up in the 1970s,” Scheff said. “We’ll sprinkle a few songs of mine in there, but we won’t be doing any Chicago. That’s a separate thing.” While bass seems like the obvious choice for Scheff to learn, it wasn’t his first choice. “It was the last one, actually,” he recalled. “I started on piano when I was around 6 years old, just picking up things by ear. I tried to take lessons for a little while, then went to guitar.” Fate had other plans for Scheff. “My buddies and I in sixth grade put a band together and they all grabbed the cool instruments,” he said. “The bass was the only thing left. I thought it was appropriate because my parents split up when I was about 3. I really didn’t get to spend much time growing up with my dad, so it felt like a connection to him. I thought if I played bass maybe I could try and follow in his footsteps a little bit.” Though Scheff is a regular visitor to the area, there are some things he misses. “The whole beach community, just getting up and going surfing and a handful of friends,” he said. “I just got out of the water in Daytona Beach,” he said. “That reminded me a lot of growing up in San Diego.” At 52, Scheff still enjoys playing music as much as ever. “I love seeing the joy it brings to people,” he said. “We go out there every night, and you can just tell that when you are playing a song people know real well, it takes them back to a point in their life and experiences that they’ve been through.” He said he considers this connection with his audience to be special — magical, even. “They can be having the worst day in their life, and the minute they hear a song, it takes them to a better place. And you’re part of that delivery method. It’s pretty awesome,” he said. • JASON SCHEFF: Sunday, Oct. 12 at LESTAT’S COFFEEHOUSE, 3343 Adams Ave. 9 p.m. All ages. Cover TBD. www.Lestats.com.
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    News
    OBMA again set to laud merchants, volunteers, public officials who make a difference in OB
    The yearly Ocean Beach MainStreet Association (OBMA) Awards Celebration and Annual Meeting will be Thursday, Oct. 23 at the Ocean Beach Masonic Center, 1711 Sunset Cliffs Blvd. The relaxed and fun-...
    Oct 08, 2014 | 0 0 comments | 2 2 recommendations | email to a friend
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    Sports
    Pointers hit high gear with wins over Scripps Ranch, Santana
    Point Loma running back Jaylen Griffin spent the night of Oct. 2 at the home of his teammate and close friend, receiver and defensive back Sergio Gallegos. On Oct. 3, the two players accounted for ...
    Oct 08, 2014 | 0 0 comments | 7 7 recommendations | email to a friend
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    Opinion
    GUEST VIEW: End of an era for Ob barber still a happy sunset story
    This isn’t a sad story because there are two happy endings. But it starts with a bit of nostalgia for an Ocean Beach that is no more. First was the pet store on Cable Street and Newport Avenue. The...
    Sep 24, 2014 | 0 0 comments | 5 5 recommendations | email to a friend
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    Arts & Entertainment
    Music on the Point returns with stellar organist performance
    Music on the Point, the concert series hosted by All Souls’ Episcopal Church, returns on Sunday, Oct. 19 at 4 p.m. The opening concert will be performed by Gabriel Arregui, organist-choirmaster of ...
    Oct 08, 2014 | 0 0 comments | 4 4 recommendations | email to a friend
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    Business
    A public market emerges on the horizon at Liberty Station
    What was originally designated for a project called The Shops in the 22,000-square-foot wing of Liberty Station’s Building 1 will now become the site of Liberty Public Market, a culinary bazaar of ...
    Oct 08, 2014 | 0 0 comments | 4 4 recommendations | email to a friend
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    Obituaries
    James Fielding Vaughan, aka ‘Von Ton the Atom Bomb’ of Pacific Beach, 85
    James “Jim” Fielding Vaughan, 85, of Pacific Beach, passed away at home on Sept. 12. A celebration of life will be held at 3 p.m. on Friday, Oct. 10 at Mission Point Park.   “Von Ton the Atom Bomb”...
    Oct 01, 2014 | 0 0 comments | 8 8 recommendations | email to a friend
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