test
Sdnews rss feed
    Community briefs for Ocean Beach and Point Loma
    Sep 17, 2017 | 3063 views | 0 0 comments | 8 8 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Sunset from Newport Avenue in Ocean Beach. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    Sunset from Newport Avenue in Ocean Beach. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    slideshow
    Ocean Beach Historical Society presentation Ocean Beach Historical Society will present “Kumeyaay Resistance and ‘Abusive’ Art at Mission San Diego and the San Diego Presidio” by Richard Carrico at 7 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 21 at P.L. United Methodist Church, 1984 Sunset Cliffs Blvd. Do you ever wonder how the Kumeyaay might have resisted Spanish colonization besides sacking Mission San Diego in 1775? Is there any chance that they used art forms to show their disdain for the Spaniards right beneath (and above) the eyes of the colonists? In this highly informative and engaging talk, historian and anthropologist Carrico will delve into the “dark art” that the Kumeyaay used to continue their ancient artistic practices and their use of symbology. The Kumeyaay served as laborers at both the mission and presidio and as part of that work effort they formed and fired the adobe roof tiles (tejas) and floor tiles (baldosas) at both outposts. Probably unknown to their supervisors and to Spanish authorities, some Kumeyaay inscribed the wet adobe with images and symbols. Many of the images are comparable to designs in local rock art and on ceramic pots and vessels that predate the arrival of the Spaniards. They include circles, concentric designs, cross-hatching, and what may be human figures. In addition, some of the designs depict things and places on Presidio Hill. Through a series of slides and images, Carrico will guide you back to the 1770-1820 period when the tiles were formed and decorated and then link the art work to a far more ancient period. Carrico will strongly suggest that the images have deep- rooted meaning and form what one scholar has called “abusive art;” art that is meant to reflect cultural persistence and a rejection of some of the Spanish dictates. Fire Fighters and Friends Celebrity Luncheon  Over the past 34 years, the San Diego City Firefighters have donated thousands of dollars and volunteer hours to United Cerebral Palsy of San Diego. This year marks the 34th consecutive year that the San Diego City Firefighters have served as the major sponsor and underwriter of the annual “Fire Fighters and Friends Celebrity Waiters Luncheon” for UCP. The luncheon, to be held 11:30 a.m. Friday, Sept. 22, at the Coronado Island Marriott Resort and Spa, draws a host of local and Hollywood celebrities to serve some 400 participants. Attendees will have a chance at some live, silent and raffle items at the luncheon.   Tickets start at $80 per person and reservations may be made by calling the UCP office at 858-571-5365 (ext. 112) or at www.ucpsd.org. Sponsors for the event include KyXy 96.5, Energy 103.7, Location Edit,  Berkshire Hathaway HomeState Cos., the San Diego Community Newspaper Group and KUSI-TV 9/51 News. Garden Club meeting The Point Loma Garden Club will meet at 10 a.m. on Oct. 11 at Portuguese Hall, 2818 Avenida de Portugal. The topic is “Succulent Tapestries” by Laura Eubanks of Design for Serenity. Guests are welcome to attend. Join the club for an interesting program on these water wise plants. Pets blessings Pastor Deb will bless pets and animals from 3 to 5 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 23 at the Westminster Park located at Westminster Presbyterian Church, 3598 Talbot St. (corner of Talbot and Canon) in Point Loma. A brief, informal “Preachin’ in the Park” will follow. For questions, call 619-223-3193. Memorial concert for Aristotle Georgio On Sept. 17, a memorial will be held at Winston’s Beach Club from 1 to 5 p.m. in honor of Aristotle Georgio, who died on Aug. 2. Georgio was a musician who has been playing at OB venues since the ’70s. He played the harmonica for a number of local groups, as well as BB King, Bo Diddley, and The Allman Brothers. Georgio was a well-known figure in Ocean Beach. ‘Bike for Boobs’ fundraiser One local breast cancer survivor plans to paint Point Loma pink for the fifth year in a row. Sandy Hanshaw, owner of The Wine Pub and The Coffee Hub, announces the return of her iconic neighborhood bike ride and celebration – Bike for Boobs. Hanshaw brought Bike for Boobs to life in San Diego in 2013 as she underwent treatment for stage-three breast cancer. On Sunday, Oct. 15 at 3 p.m., dozens of pink-adorned supporters will grab bikes and join the San Diego County Bike Coalition for a casual ride around Shelter Island. Following the ride, guests will reunite at The Pub’s enchanting outdoor patio for live music, gourmet food, auction items and, of course, wine.  To celebrate the fifth year of Bike for Boobs, Hanshaw has partnered with Nomad Donuts to offer guests bike and boob-inspired donuts as they peruse an assortment of silent auction items donated from local businesses. A pink-mosaic picture frame, decorated by local artist and ArtBeat San Diego Founder Kristel Boe, will be on display for guests to add the names of loved ones going through a battle with breast cancer, photos or words of encouragement to women everywhere.  Mobile blood drives Big O Tires to host blood drive in partnership with San Diego Blood Bank, Thursday, Sept. 21, from 1 p.m. to 6 p.m. at 1106 Garnet Ave. In partnership with San Diego Blood Bank, Saturday, Sept. 23, from 9 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. at 2816 Historic Decatur Road Parking Lot. About 1 in 7 people entering a hospital need blood. One pint of blood, which is the amount volunteers give when they donate blood, can save up to three lives. Since blood is always needed, volunteers are asked to give blood for patients, such as those going through cancer or trauma. Donors must meet the following eligibility requirements: - 17 and older (Age 16 requires a parental consent); - 114 pounds and in good health. Donors are advised to drink plenty of fluids prior to donation. Maintain usual eating habits on the day of donation, avoid fatty foods if possible. All donors must show picture identification upon signing up to donate. Donors are encouraged to schedule an appointment for their convenience but walk-ins are also welcome. To schedule an appointment, call 1-800-4MY-SDBB (1-800-469-7322) or visit www.SanDiegoBloodBank.org. OB photo contest The Ocean Beach Town Council has started a "Share Your OB" photo contest. To enter just tag your best photos of OB with #shareyourOB and post on Instagram or Facebook. Winner receives bragging rights and is entered in a monthly drawing for some cool swag. Each Saturday, a new winner will be announced. So get out there and #shareyourOB.
    Comments
    (0)
    Comments-icon Post a Comment
    No Comments Yet
    San Diego Airport program to reduce noise levels in nearby homes
    by DAVE SCHWAB
    Sep 14, 2017 | 36070 views | 0 0 comments | 13 13 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    A plane comes in for a landing at San Diego International Airport. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    A plane comes in for a landing at San Diego International Airport. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    slideshow
    San Diego International Airport has received two grants totaling nearly $14 million, part of a $318.1 million package of grants to 78 airports in 34 states, to provide infrastructure upgrades. “The grant funding is to continue the airport’s Quieter Home Program,” said San Diego Airport spokesperson Rebecca Bloomfield. “It will help continue projects already under way within the areas the FAA has approved for sound attenuation.” The Quieter Home Program is the San Diego County Regional Airport Authority’s Residential Sound Insulation Program. The FAA has determined that residences within the 65-plus decibel level contour map around San Diego International Airport may be eligible for sound insulation treatments to mitigate aircraft noise. The FAA has set a goal of reducing interior noise levels for eligible residents by at least five decibels inside the home, providing a noticeable reduction in noise. The Airport Authority’s Quieter Home Program is the means to obtain that goal. The FAA said $8 million will be spent to mitigate noise for around 715 people who live around Lindbergh Field. Also, $5.7 million will be used to repair the longest of two east-west runways at Brown Field, the municipal airport nearest the U.S.-Mexico border. San Diego officials have been trying to spur development at Brown Field in recent years, including approval of a sprawling project that includes airplane hangars, industrial buildings, retail space and restaurants. The four-phase project, which could take two decades to build out, could get underway by the end of this year. “The airport improvement program helps to maintain our aviation infrastructure and supports safety, capacity, security and environmental improvements,” said U.S. Transportation Secretary Elaine Chao. “This is an important investment in these airports and the economic vitality of their respective communities.” Bloomfield noted the Quieter Home Program’s goal “... is achieved by treating windows and doors in habitable spaces. We also offer some form of ventilation treatment if they don’t already have one.” Bloomfield estimated 6,000 homes remain within the established noise contour for sound diminishment.  Homeowners may apply for the Quieter Homes Program at www.san.org/Airport-Noise/Quieter-Home-Program. “My husband, Mike, and I were completely happy with the Quieter Home Program and all the soundproofing made to our home definitely reduced airplane noise,” said Pam Carleton, who lives in Point Loma. “Catherine Darby, our program coordinator, was responsive, communicative, and on top of our project, which was done in August 2015. We had to be out of town for a week during this process due to an unplanned family medical emergency, and Catherine kept us posted and even emailed pictures when a change was needed and she wanted our approval. We had a very positive experience with the Quieter Home Program,” Carleton said. The average cost to sound proof a home against airplane noise? “The average cost is $30,000 per home,” answered Bloomfield, adding, “we estimate the $8 million grant will provide funding for approximately one year, or 286 homes within the program boundary.” With the exception of last fiscal year, Bloomfield said the Airport Authority has received an annual FAA grant for the Quieter Home Program since 2004. The program has provided sound attenuation to an estimated 3,500 homes within the program boundaries. Bloomfield pointed out each homeowner in the Quieter Homes Program is requested to complete a post-construction survey. San Diego International Airport is owned and operated by the San Diego County Regional Airport Authority. In 2015, traffic at San Diego International exceeded 20 million passengers, serving more than 500 scheduled operations carrying about 50,000 passengers daily. While primarily serving domestic traffic, San Diego has nonstop international flights to Canada, Germany, Japan, Mexico, Switzerland and the United Kingdom. SAN is the busiest single runway airport in the U.S. and third-busiest single runway in the world, behind Mumbai and London Gatwick. Due to the airport's short usable-runway, close proximity to the skyscrapers of downtown San Diego and steep landing approach as a result of the nearby Peninsular Ranges. SAN has been called "the busiest, most difficult single runway in the world."  SAN operates in controlled airspace served by the Southern California TRACON, which is some of the busiest airspace in the world.
    Comments
    (0)
    Comments-icon Post a Comment
    No Comments Yet
    GO WITH THE FLOW – Wednesday evenings hit new highs in Ocean Beach
    by Mathilde Rousseau Bjerregaard
    Sep 13, 2017 | 5472 views | 0 0 comments | 19 19 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Slackliner Eric Hake performs for a crowd on a recent Wednesday evening in Ocean Beach. / PHOTO BY THOMAS MELVILLE
    Slackliner Eric Hake performs for a crowd on a recent Wednesday evening in Ocean Beach. / PHOTO BY THOMAS MELVILLE
    slideshow
    Liberty Woolley, from Auburn, Calif., dances in the drum circle on Wednesday evening in Ocean Beach. / PHOTO BY THOMAS MELVILLE
    Liberty Woolley, from Auburn, Calif., dances in the drum circle on Wednesday evening in Ocean Beach. / PHOTO BY THOMAS MELVILLE
    slideshow
    Rachel Mulvaney, aka the Yoga Ninja, does acro yoga during a recent Wednesday evening in Ocean Beach. / PHOTO BY THOMAS MELVILLE
    Rachel Mulvaney, aka the Yoga Ninja, does acro yoga during a recent Wednesday evening in Ocean Beach. / PHOTO BY THOMAS MELVILLE
    slideshow
    Take slackliners, drum circles and dancers, add acro yoga, hula hoops and huge soap bubbles to the mix, and Wednesdays in Ocean Beach have reached a new level of chill. Along with the Farmers Market, this vibe fits perfectly into the relaxed bohemian neighborhood. Keep walking along Newport Avenue by the colorful stalls selling crafts, clothes, and cuisines, eventually one ends up at the little grass area next to the beach, which is filled with creative people playing music, balancing on bodies and slacklines, all the while going with the flow. “There are a lot of people doing different things and it is also a good place to meet other people doing slacklining,” said Eric Hake, who comes to Ocean Beach from Mission Valley on Wednesdays to slackline. Hake moved to San Diego about a year ago and thinks it is a perfect city for slacklining, which he does five days a week in OB and Bonita Cove. “It is just a lot of fun. You can do it almost everywhere. You just need two places to make hangers,” Hake said. The grassy area off Abbott Street is also filled with young women dancing around with hula hoops and plenty of acro yoga enthusiasts. “I come here because there are so many beautiful people and that helps me relax in the middle of the week,” said Casley Shannon, who is a student at San Diego State University. Shannon likes to hula-hoop and she comes to the Ocean Beach Farmers Market every Wednesday with her friends. “I like the energy and all the creativity that is happening. There is a very loving, accepting, and creative vibe here,” Shannon said. As the sun gets closer to the horizon, the drums beat louder, and the crowd grows larger around the grassy area as visitors watch the young people expressing themselves. “I think it is fantastic to watch people being creative with athletics and yoga. I am an athlete myself and the things they are doing are really hard to do,” said Sandy Valone, who lives in Point Loma. Valone brought her sister, who was visiting from Hawaii, so she could see the new things happening around the OB Farmers Market. “I think it is a really nice and helpful thing,” said Valone.
    Comments
    (0)
    Comments-icon Post a Comment
    No Comments Yet
    Three sea turtles returned to ocean after rehabilitation at SeaWorld
    by Mathilde Rousseau Bjerregaard
    Sep 12, 2017 | 13769 views | 0 0 comments | 18 18 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Tucker, a rescued olive ridley sea turtle, is returned to the ocean by SeaWorld San Diego aquarist, Danielle Castillo (left) and Seattle Aquarium aquarist, Amy Green, 15 miles off the coast of San Diego near an oceanic current that flows southward towards warmer water off Mexico. / Photo credit: Mike Aguilera/SeaWorld San Diego
    Tucker, a rescued olive ridley sea turtle, is returned to the ocean by SeaWorld San Diego aquarist, Danielle Castillo (left) and Seattle Aquarium aquarist, Amy Green, 15 miles off the coast of San Diego near an oceanic current that flows southward towards warmer water off Mexico. / Photo credit: Mike Aguilera/SeaWorld San Diego
    slideshow
    Tucker, a rescued olive ridley sea turtle, swims underwater. / photo credit: Jess Patterson/SeaWorld San Diego
    Tucker, a rescued olive ridley sea turtle, swims underwater. / photo credit: Jess Patterson/SeaWorld San Diego
    slideshow
    Three olive ridley sea turtles, which had been rehabilitating at SeaWorld for almost two years, were returned to their Pacific Ocean home the morning of Monday, Sept. 11. The sea turtles, named Solstice, Lightning and Tucker, were rescued from cold waters near the Oregon coast in 2014 and 2015 and flown to SeaWorld for rehabilitation over the past few years by the U.S. Coast Guard. Solstice and Lightning, both female turtles, arrived to SeaWorld in February 2015 and March 2016, and male turtle Tucker was transferred in April 2016. When the sea turtles were found they were cold-stunned and suffering from buoyancy issues, which left the animals unable to dive and forage for food. “Sea turtles like tropical warm water and the temperature regulates their bodies ability to work. When the water gets cold the animals system start shutting down and they end up on the beach,” said Mike Price, who is assistant curator at Zoological Operations at SeaWorld. At SeaWorld the sea turtles have undergone a groundbreaking rehabilitation protocol that involved placing the turtles in a 12-foot-deep, 115,000-gallon saltwater rehabilitation pool. Here the sea turtles slowly but surely began to dive, forage and maintain proper buoyancy. After the lengthy rehab, SeaWorld’s aquarium experts and veterinarians said that the turtles were in healthy condition, of good weight, navigating through a water column, eating a variety of food types, and were ready to make in on their own in their ocean home. The sea turtles were loaded onto SeaWorld’s rescue boat Second Chance on Monday morning and returned to the ocean approximately 15 miles off the coast of San Diego. Prior to their return, the sea turtles were outfitted with satellite transmitters by Hubbs-SeaWorld Research Institute to monitor their movements. In that way, they are able to follow them for up to six months. “What is so exciting about today is that after close to two years of hard work we get to return the sea turtles and give them a second chance in life,” said Price. Olive ridley turtles are the smallest turtle in the Pacific Ocean and they are listed on the federal endangered species list as threatened. They get their name from the olive green color of their shells.
    Comments
    (0)
    Comments-icon Post a Comment
    No Comments Yet
    ‘Battle of the Sexes’ movie nets Point Loma instructor
    by DAVE SCHWAB
    Sep 04, 2017 | 24871 views | 0 0 comments | 0 0 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Emma Stone as Billie Jean King and Steve Carell as Bobby Riggs in a scene from the movie 'Battle of the Sexes.'
    Emma Stone as Billie Jean King and Steve Carell as Bobby Riggs in a scene from the movie 'Battle of the Sexes.'
    slideshow
    Lornie Kuhle, tournament director of the USTA Girls' 16s and 18s Nationals at the Barnes Tennis Center in Point Loma, was a close friend of Bobby Riggs.
    Lornie Kuhle, tournament director of the USTA Girls' 16s and 18s Nationals at the Barnes Tennis Center in Point Loma, was a close friend of Bobby Riggs.
    slideshow
    The made-for-TV match dubbed “Battle of the Sexes,” which featured self-styled “male chauvinist pig” Bobby Riggs versus tennis champion Billie Jean King, broadcast on Sept. 20, 1973 to an audience of an estimated 50 million viewers in the U.S. and 90 million worldwide. San Diegans can now relive that compelling pop culture moment by watching the upcoming movie “Battle of the Sexes,” which is scheduled to be released Sept. 22. And for one Point Loma tennis instructor, it’s a return to his past. The plot, loosely based on the Riggs-King match, stars Emma Stone and Steve Carell as King and Riggs, respectively, with Andrea Riseborough, Elisabeth Shue, Austin Stowell and Sarah Silverman in supporting roles. Lornie Kuhle, tournament director of the USTA Girls' 16s and 18s Nationals at the Barnes Tennis Center in Point Loma, was a close friend of Bobby Riggs and worked as a consultant with film producers to bring the film to life. Kuhle spoke with the Peninsula Beacon about what the match, and the movie, have come to mean to him, to sports culture and international evolving gender relations moving forward. “I was the consultant for the movie,” said Kuhle, 69. “I was the person who worked with Steve Carell every day in getting him into the character of Bobby Riggs. I taught him how to play tennis like Bobby Riggs.” Robert Larimore Riggs, who died in 1995 from prostate cancer, was an American tennis champion who was the world No. 1 player for three years, first as an amateur in 1939, then as a professional in 1946 and 1947. As a 21-year-old amateur in 1939, Riggs won Wimbledon, the U.S. National Championships (now U.S. Open), and was runner-up at the French Championships. He was U.S. champion again in 1941, after a runner-up finish the year before. At age 55, Riggs competed in the first “Battle of the Sexes” challenge match in May 1973 against Margaret Court, the top-ranked female player at the time, and beat her (6–2, 6–1) in a televised match in Ramona. His easy victory landed Riggs on the cover of national magazines and reignited his fame. Riggs used his new-found celebrity to taunt female tennis players, which prompted King to accept a lucrative financial offer to play Riggs in a nationally televised match in the Houston Astrodome on Sept. 20, 1973. Against King, the reigning Wimbledon champion and one of the best female players in the world, Riggs lost in straight sets, 6–4, 6–3, 6–3. Their prime time “Battle of the Sexes” match, which had a $100,000 winner-take-all prize, remains one of the most famous and most watched tennis events of all time. Kuhle, Riggs' close friend and estate executor, pointed out Riggs, notably macho, had many redeeming qualities. “The uniqueness of his character was is promotional capacity, his showmanship, his thought process, mannerisms,” Kuhle said of the LA native. Noting King was 29 when she beat the 55-year-old Riggs, Kuhle believes that her victory helped spur on the women’s rights movement. “It was not about the money,” said Kuhle of the iconic tennis match. “Billie Jean had won nine women's titles and she couldn't even get a credit card. It had to go in a man's name. She became one of the 100 most influential people in the 20th century because of this match.” Kuhle added movie producers are now “recapturing this historical match.” The historicity of the match itself was aided greatly, the tennis pro said, by Riggs' promotional abilities, which he likened to “Barnum & Bailey.” The Barnes Center is part of Youth Tennis San Diego, a nonprofit whose purpose is to promote the educational, physical  and social development of all youth through organized tennis and educational activities. Youth tennis' community programs encourage youth participation, personal integrity, leadership and competitive spirit in a frienly environment that builds responsible citizens. For more information about the movie “Battle of the Sexes” visit www.foxsearchlight.com/battleofthesexes. Battle of the Sexes What: The film depicts the 1973 tennis match between Billie Jean King and Bobby Riggs, which became the most watched televised sports event of all time. Trapped in the media glare, King and Riggs were on opposites sides of a binary argument, but off-court each was fighting more personal and complex battles. Actors: Emma Stone as Billie Jean King, Steve Carell as Bobby Riggs. Release date: Sept. 22. Info: www.foxsearchlight.com/battleofthesexes.
    Comments
    (0)
    Comments-icon Post a Comment
    No Comments Yet
    News
    City, County offering free vaccinations, urges hand washing to help stop spread of hepatitis A
    With local health officials projecting the rise in documented hepatitis A cases to continue, Mayor Kevin L. Faulconer, County Supervisor Ron Roberts, San Diego County health officials and several c...
    Published - Tuesday, September 19
    full story
    City to pay $12.5M to family whose child was killed at dangerous crosswalk in Point Loma
    The San Diego City Council on Sept. 19 unanimously approved a $12.5 million payment to settle a lawsuit brought by a family that contends dangerous driving conditions led to a roadway accident that...
    Published - Tuesday, September 19
    full story
    Bodhi Tree Concerts presents Gilbert and Sullivan’s ‘Trial by Jury’ in Point Loma
    Bodhi Tree Concerts closes its sixth season with Gilbert and Sullivan’s operetta “Trial by Jury” at 4 p.m. on Sunday, Sept. 24 at All Souls’ Episcopal Church, 1475 Chatsworth Blvd. A free reception...
    Published - Sunday, September 17
    full story
    Marie Haddad to perform with friends at Humphrey’s Backstage Live
    One of San Diego’s musical treasures, pianist and singer-songwriter Marie Haddad, performs at Humphrey’s Backstage Live on Sept. 28. She will be celebrating the release of her new album, “Stories F...
    Published - Saturday, September 16
    full story
    Next Space plans redevelopment of old shopping center site on Voltaire Street
    New owners of the dilapidated small shopping center on Voltaire Street at Las Lomas want to replace the old hodge podge of leftovers there, which in recent years featured Sunshine Liquor as the mos...
    Published - Saturday, September 16
    full story
    $1,000 reward offered for information on suspect wanted in Ocean Beach homicide
    San Diego County Crime Stoppers and investigators from the San Diego Police Department’s Homicide Unit are asking for the public’s help in identifying and locating an unknown suspect wanted for the...
    Published - Friday, September 15
    full story
    City Council to consider proposal for renaming stadium
    The San Diego City Council will vote Tuesday on a proposal to rename the City’s stadium in Mission Valley. In a naming rights agreement with San Diego County Credit Union, the new proposed name wou...
    Published - Friday, September 15
    full story
    Hepatitis A case reported at Pacific Beach restaurant
    San Diego County health officials are advising the public that anyone who may have eaten or had beverages at the World Famous restaurant in Pacific Beach on seven specific dates and times that they...
    Published - Friday, September 15
    full story
    Ocean Beach Woman’s Club floor campaign a smashing success
    Thanks to the generous support of the community, and especially Steve Yeng, the Ocean Beach Woman’s Club met the Laying a New Foundation Floor Campaign goal. We have begun in earnest to ready the c...
    Published - Friday, September 15
    full story
    Police arrest suspect in 2011 Midway murder
    On April 19, 2011 at 7:30 a.m., San Diego Police Department officers responded to a report of a shooting at 1930 Rosecrans St. They arrived at Joe’s Auto Repair to find Jalal (Joe) Abou, the shop o...
    Published - Thursday, September 14
    full story
    Doughballs pizza, Crackheads breakfast eateries open at Liberty Public Market
    If you're into cereal or custom pizza, Liberty Public Market has two new eateries joining its varied mix to please your palates. One is Doughballs, a new take on all things pizza. The other is Crac...
    Published - Thursday, September 14
    full story
    A Dane now living in San Diego, part 7
    There are seven continents, 193 countries, and more than a 1,000 different religions in the world. Every country has its own culture, traditions, laws, norms and its own people. When you move to an...
    Published - Thursday, September 14
    full story
    San Diegans to celebrate being clean and sober at Liberty Station
    Hundreds of people will come together to celebrate being clean and drug-free at an annual celebration in Point Loma. The event, sponsored by the County Health and Human Services Agency and its many...
    Published - Wednesday, September 13
    full story
    Mid-year crime report shows drop in homicides, and property crime
    The number of homicides that occurred in the region during the first half of 2017 were lower than the first half of 2016, with property crime also showing sizeable decreases, according to a new SAN...
    Published - Tuesday, September 12
    full story
    Current Issues(Archives)
    The Peninsula Beacon, September 14th, 2017
    download The Peninsula Beacon, September 14th, 2017
    The Peninsula Beacon, September 14th, 2017
    La Jolla Village News September 8th, 2017
    download La Jolla Village News September 8th, 2017
    La Jolla Village News September 8th, 2017
    Beach & Bay Press, September 7th, 2017
    download Beach & Bay Press, September 7th, 2017
    Beach & Bay Press, September 7th, 2017
    The Peninsula Beacon, August 31st, 2017
    download The Peninsula Beacon, August 31st, 2017
    The Peninsula Beacon, August 31st, 2017