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    Mean Green Team of volunteers brings life to Point Loma
    by CASSANDRA PENALVER
    Jun 25, 2017 | 4371 views | 0 0 comments | 6 6 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Mean Green Team cleaning the corner of West Point Loma and Nimitz Boulevard. / Photo by Cassandra Penalver
    Mean Green Team cleaning the corner of West Point Loma and Nimitz Boulevard. / Photo by Cassandra Penalver
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    Mean Green Team at NTC Park. / Photo by Cassandra Penalver
    Mean Green Team at NTC Park. / Photo by Cassandra Penalver
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    Every Friday, the Mean Green Team bands together to work on various service projects in order to give back to their community. The Mean Green Team is the Beautification Committee of the Point Loma Association who dedicates their time to spruce up 17 different public areas in Point Loma. According to Mean Green Team member Cecilia Carrick, the team does everything from planting, weeding, trimming, and even cleaning off graffiti. While the Point Loma Association has been around for 55 years, the Mean Green Team was founded in the 1990s. Today, the team is around 50 members strong with roughly 20 to 25 members participating at any given community service event. They pride themselves on their diversity that range from doctors and lawyers to nurses, teachers, and even submariners who all work together to achieve the association’s mission: to improve their neighborhood. Before beginning most of their projects, the team also takes it upon themselves to gather and collect funding grants from the city, county, and private individuals to assist with the community projects. When they face a project they might not be able to tackle alone, they are never hesitant to reach out to other community members such as the police department and team up with them to complete tasks. One of the team’s most predominant projects is “Sticks on Fire” on Nimitz Boulevard near the Point Loma welcome sign. The Mean Green Team raised $120,000 and replaced the previously existing median with red blooming aloe that gave this site its fitting name. Aside from garden work and landscaping, the team also works on community tasks such as bringing down excessive billboards on Rosecrans and beautifying local utility boxes. Carrick mentioned that the team finds local artists to paint utility boxes throughout Point Loma. The team then reviews the artwork and makes sure that it fits well within designated neighborhoods before moving forward with any given artist. Not only do these painted utility boxes add character to their community, but also aids in deterring any unwanted graffiti as well. The Mean Green Team’s 17 areas it takes care of in Point Loma include: Ed’s Triangle, Pork Chops, Nimitz West, Dana Middle School, Dewey Elementary School, Soto Street Shed, Liberty Station/NTC Rose Garden, Tennyson Triangle, The Village, Canon Hiking Trail, Point Loma Park, Rosecrans Jacarandas, Catalina/Canon Median, Nimitz Median, Poe Triangle, and Sandy Beach on Shelter Island. After every team meetup on early Friday mornings, the volunteers continue to spend time together for a well-deserved coffee or food rest at locations near the site they were working at that morning. The Mean Green Team does not come together to only volunteer and go home but they also enjoy spending time with one another – many of the volunteers have been loyal to the team for more than 20 years. The team does great things to achieve their mission of improving their neighborhood and look forward to continuing to give back to their community as much as possible. For more information on the Mean Green Team, visit pointloma.org.
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    Point Loma High holds 92nd commencement ceremony
    by SCOTT HOPKINS
    Jun 20, 2017 | 15034 views | 0 0 comments | 17 17 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    The traditional cap toss to end the ceremony. / Photo by Scott Hopkins
    The traditional cap toss to end the ceremony. / Photo by Scott Hopkins
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    A grad about to walk across the platform. / Photo by Scott Hopkins
    A grad about to walk across the platform. / Photo by Scott Hopkins
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    The processional heads into the stadium. / Photo by Scott Hopkins
    The processional heads into the stadium. / Photo by Scott Hopkins
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    Gabriel Hall, with family, was listed among Honor Roll graduates and will be attending SDSU.  / Photo by Scott Hopkins
    Gabriel Hall, with family, was listed among Honor Roll graduates and will be attending SDSU.  / Photo by Scott Hopkins
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    Grads listen to a speech during the ceremony. / Photo by Scott Hopkins
    Grads listen to a speech during the ceremony. / Photo by Scott Hopkins
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    On an unusually warm spring day, a westerly breeze carried waves of mixed emotions across some 380 members of the Point Loma High Class of 2017 and their assembled families and friends on June 14. Everyone smiled while scanning the rows of shimmering maroon gowns and, as names were called, shouts of love and support were heard. And yes, many were seen wiping tears of joy from their faces.
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    Station 22 in Point Loma razed to make way for new facility
    by SCOTT HOPKINS
    Jun 20, 2017 | 1127 views | 2 2 comments | 14 14 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Construction crews razed Station 22 in early June. / Photo by John Howard
    Construction crews razed Station 22 in early June. / Photo by John Howard
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    This will be the view of Fire Station 22 from Catalina Boulevard when the rebuilt station opens in about one year. The $5.7 million station will have bays for two fire engines, cover 6,180 square feet and feature dormitories for five firefighters plus a captain's quarters.
    This will be the view of Fire Station 22 from Catalina Boulevard when the rebuilt station opens in about one year. The $5.7 million station will have bays for two fire engines, cover 6,180 square feet and feature dormitories for five firefighters plus a captain's quarters.
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    In December of 1942, the United States observed the end of the first year's fighting in World War II. In San Diego, a population of 220,000 included many supporting the war effort by working at local military bases and factories. Meanwhile, enough houses had been built on what was then rural Point Loma to warrant a fire station, and that month Station 22 was dedicated at 1055 Catalina Blvd. That station, with a Spanish tile roof and built using lots of brick, cost the city a paltry $7,800. The station today has a district of coverage measuring 5.97 square miles, one of the largest of any San Diego Fire-Rescue crews, ranging from parts of Ocean Beach to Shelter Island and the Cabrillo National Monument. It was San Diego's newest fire station since Station 21 opened in 1934 to serve Mission and Pacific beaches. In 1943, Station 23 was built to cover Linda Vista. Vacant lots in Point Loma continued to disappear and the little station greatly helped reach emergencies faster than the other closest Stations 15 (Ocean Beach) and 20 (then known as the Midway-Frontier district). But as the decades passed, it became apparent that the little building wasn't big enough to hold fire engines that were growing in size in addition to greater needs for crew working, exercise, sleeping, and living quarters. After years of budgetary delays, the money has been set aside for the 75-year-old station to be replaced, and a contractor has already built temporary quarters for Engine 22 and her crews on the southeast corner of the station property. Officials emphasize there will be no interruption of services during construction. Then on an early June day, the wrecking company gathered to bring the old building down. While putting up a good fight, it wasn't long before she was reduced to piles of metal, brick and very old lumber. But in her place, a new, much larger station will stand proudly at the same site – at a far greater cost. The new one-story building will measure 6,180 square feet with bays for two larger, modern engines and perhaps a truck. Dormitories for a captain and five crew members will provide spacious quarters when not on calls or performing other station work. Cost for the new facility: $5.74 million. Construction dates are approximate, but the project is slated to begin soon and conclude next summer. Officials emphasize there will be no interruption of services during construction.  In an effort to provoke curiosity of both residents and persons passing the new station, Los Angeles-based artist Roberto Delgado has been granted a public art commission by the city to create a site-specific artwork for the facade. The design will consist of a four-panel mural installation covering the vertical columns on the north face of the station. A city statement notes "Delgado’s colorful and complex artwork for the fire station will chronicle the history and character of the Point Loma neighborhood and its firefighters." Contemporary and historic photos will be arranged into dynamic overlapping and layered compositions. Photographic imagery ranging from the Old Point Loma Lighthouse to the neighborhood’s past and present firefighters will be transferred to ceramic tiles using a silkscreen and airbrush process and then assembled to create the installation. Delgado has previously completed installations at three Minneapolis-St. Paul light rail stations and a transit center in Ann Arbor, Mich. He has studied in Rome and has a masters of fine arts degree from UCLA and received grants from major groups and two Fulbright Fellowships. Fire facts In fiscal year 2016, Engine 22 responded to 1,637 medical calls, 150 fires and 42 rescues. Station 15 was built in 1915 at 4926 Newport Ave. The current station on Voltaire Street was opened in August 1949 at a cost of $37,000. In fiscal year 2016, Engine 15 responded to 2,343 medical calls, 218 fires and 31 rescues.
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    Eric Awes
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    June 24, 2017
    Would ride our bike to the staion and the fireman would show us the bell that rang for fires and the tape that spit out the coded address of the fire...could hear the siren start up when the truck drove away for a fire call, from our Home on Dixon Place. (Four streets above Dana Junior High off of Chatsworth Blvd.
    imhoppy
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    17 Hours Ago
    As you know, Eric Awes, I grew up on Wildwood Road just a block away from you. We had the distinction of living right next door to one of Station 22's Captains, Bill Hanna. Every time 22 went out on a call that had them roll down Chatsworth Blvd., Bill's wife Helen would stand on their front porch and wave to him as they passed. Then, after such a call, Bill would often have the engineer stop by his home for awhile, so we became very familiar with the old engine used in that era at Station 22. That was also in the era when the engines and trucks were equipped with a large bell mounted on the right side of the rig in such a position the Captain could pull a chord from his seat and ring it as they made their way back to the station. The sound of that bell signaled me as a kid to run outside and admire the old engine while Bill Hanna made his visits. It must have been in every boy's genes back then...we all wanted to be firemen!
    Fall in love with Ocean Beach all over again: 38th annual Street Fair and Chili Cook Off a summer tradition
    by BART MENDOZA
    Jun 19, 2017 | 4463 views | 0 0 comments | 16 16 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    More than 70,000 people attended the Ocean Beach Street Fair last year. / Photo by Jim Grant
    More than 70,000 people attended the Ocean Beach Street Fair last year. / Photo by Jim Grant
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    One of San Diego’s most beloved annual traditions, the Ocean Beach Street Fair and Chili Cook Off, returns for the 38th year on June 24, along Newport Avenue. Themed this year to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the 1967 “Summer of Love,” the free, all ages, street fair kicks off at 10 a.m., with more than 70,000 people expected to attend and plenty of music, art, food and fun for everyone. Beyond the usual enjoyment of walking around the event and taking things in, the street fair offers a myriad of opportunities to get involved, from making music to painting murals. Fairgoers will find five stages featuring a wide range of San Diego’s top talent, carnival rides and games for all ages, a chili cook off, a beachside beer garden, a community mural, an artist’s alley with unique creations, a musical petting zoo giving young fair goers an opportunity to try an instrument and much more. “It’s amazing to see how the street transforms into the street fair,” said Ocean Beach Main Street Association executive director, Denny Knox. “There’s so much to see and do, it’s hard to pick a favorite thing, but the food and especially the music are big draws.” The music at the street fair this year includes such names as groove band DJ Williams with members of Karl Denson’s Tiny Universe, singer-songwriter Jeff Berkeley, award-winning indie rockers The Verigolds and home town heroes, rockers Bad Science Fiction. According to Ted Wigler, who books the main stage in addition to Winston’s, he and co-booker music producer Michael Head, who also books the weekly Farmer’s Market, are open to all types of music, but there are some guidelines. “We want quality of course, someone with a name that means something outside, but not too big where it might cause problems from a crowd standpoint,” he said. “We’re very cognizant that this is an all-ages event.” Wigler is happy to be involved with the event “It gives me the opportunity to give back to my community, which has given me so much,” he said. “It’s a way to be involved and not just picking up trash, this is something I like to do.” He also likes the collaborative nature of the event. “It’s great to have a chance to work with Michael Head and everyone at the OBMA, there is such a strong sense of collaboration.” Head, for his part, considers music to be vital to the event. “It kind of dictates your day,” he said. “Where you're gonna be and when. I think it's a major part of the draw. I mean music, with the ocean and chili? What could be better?” Beyond appealing to new audiences, artists involved are happy with the overall positive nature of the event. “I'd start by saying that anything going on its 38th consecutive year was a good idea to begin with,” said Chuck Schiele, who will be performing at the street fair with his band Bad Science Fiction. “The Street Fair is emblematic of the best features of San Diego,” he said. “There is a strong sense of community in OB, more than most neighborhoods, so I cite that as the number one attraction. Everything about the event comes from a positive place, and therefore exudes a profound positive vibe.” One of the street fair’s unique attractions is music center, Rock ’n’ Roll San Diego, which will host an area on Newport Avenue, complete with a KISS tribute band in residence, a musical petting zoo and a live band made up of the school’s instructors, who will also be giving free 15 minute lessons to fairgoers. “We want to show that music is something anybody can do and have fun with. We can have you onstage with one of our bands in minutes, playing a classic rock song,” said Langford. “We don’t just get young folks for this,” he continued. “We get some adults all the way up to grandpas, all ages are welcomed and encouraged.” Select lucky fans will also get a chance to play with the KISS tribute band, who will be decked out in their traditional make up and costumes, but also be sporting some ’60s gear to fit in with the street fair’s theme. “We’ve done the event for several years now and it’s so much fun meeting people and seeing the neighborhood come together like this. I enjoy the celebration of life. Everyone coming here is doing so to have a good time, enjoy the sunshine, music and food.” While music is a big part of the street fair, for many, the food is also a major draw. “There is an amazing array of vendors this year, all sorts of fun stuff,” said OBMA office assistant Claudia Jack. Amongst the culinary treats this year will be Barrett's Lemonade, which uses the whole lemon in their drinks, Say Cheese, which will offer cheese curds and poppers, Ledesma Concessions, which will have non-alcoholic pina coladas, served in a pineapple, and Mighty Foods, which will offer such treat as sushi burritos and Thailand Ice Cream rolls. “You can stop in at any of the booths or restaurants along the way, but we also have contests that are a lot of fun,” Jack said. In addition to the chili contest, eaters with a competitive nature can also enter the “Hodad’s Burger Eating” contest and the “Best Bloody Mary in OB” contest, the latter featuring samples from 15 different area bars and restaurants. Meanwhile, if you are more artistically inclined, you can also take part in creating a community mural. Children and adults of all ages are welcome to purchase a $15 square at mural area on Bacon Street just south of Newport. After the street fair, the murals are sealed and installed in the community. “That’s a favorite activity, every year,” Jack said. “It’s wonderful to see youngsters creating their art.” Despite all the hard work putting on the Ocean Beach Street Fair, Knox considers the efforts well worth it, though she doesn’t have time to enjoy the fruits of their labor on the day. “We have 150 or more volunteers and we don’t catch our breath until after 10 p.m. when it’s over,” she laughed. “We’re all still in awe,” she said. “We worry if anybody will come and then when we see the crowds and people having fun, it’s exhilarating.” Anyone wanting to avoid the parking and traffic mayhem near the fair itself has several options. For bicyclists, the San Diego County Bicycle Coalition will provide a free bike valet area on Bacon Street at Newport Avenue. Meanwhile those with cars can drop off their vehicles and grab a trolley, running from 9:30 a.m. until 9 p.m., to the fair from either the Sunrunner lot at the corner of Pacific Highway and SeaWorld Drive or the lot near Robb Field at 2244 Bacon St. The trolley drops passengers off in the artist’s alley section of the street fair.
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    Night golf glows from fringe to fun tee times at The Loma Club
    by MANNY LOPEZ
    Jun 17, 2017 | 7210 views | 0 0 comments | 15 15 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    A golfer chips onto the green during a Glow Golf event at The Loma Club in Liberty Station. / PHOTO CONTRIBUTED
    A golfer chips onto the green during a Glow Golf event at The Loma Club in Liberty Station. / PHOTO CONTRIBUTED
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    Glow Golf, an entertainment idea akin to black light or “cosmic” bowling, has been making its way onto the fairways of The Loma Club in Liberty Station. Operated by Nightlife Golf, founder Josh Van Dermark promises golfers that the experience is not just another shot in the dark. Van Dermark said that events are designed to provide a more party-like atmosphere, where golfers play on an LED lit, 9-hole, par-3 course using special glow-in-the-dark balls. The experience is enhanced with music, beverages and contests. “It’s a great way to have a night out that’s not at a bar,” he said. “I think we need more night time experiences that are fun, and where you can get out and do things as opposed to going out to a nightclub.” Van Dermark said that events are set up to accommodate up to 100 players on the course with groups starting and ending at the same time. He added that rounds typically last under two hours. Timothy Smith, general manager of The Loma Club, said that a par-3 course made sense for Glow Golf, because of the timeliness of games, less-complicated greens, lack of need for a golf cart and the lower skill level required. He said that it’s easier to play 1,280 yards on a 9-hole, rather than 6,500 yards on an 18-hole golf course. “It’s meant to be more of a social activity,” he said. “Josh has put together a golf festival with competitions, prizes and plenty of decorative lighting.” Events are scheduled to happen once per month, with the next one planned for June 24. General admission tickets include a round of golf, and two glow-in-the-dark golf balls. According to Van Dermark, the genesis of the Glow Golf idea came one Friday evening after work, while trying to schedule some time to play a round of golf with friends. Unable to find a time that worked for all, the group thought of buying glow-in-the-dark golf balls and sneaking onto a course to play, but luckily for them, they couldn’t find the product at any of the local sporting goods stores. “That saved us the trouble of having to trespass or get a drunk in public ticket,” he said. “But it got me thinking that if I’m looking for it, other people must be doing the same.” Van Dermark said that now more than ever, people are conflicted with just being too busy working. He added that it’s hard sometimes to find time for personal enjoyment, so he set out to flip the golf world upside down and try to throw a party at night where people can play golf. “Glow Golf may not be the cheapest version of night golf there is, but it’s actually the best,” Van Dermark said. “Our mission is to get rid of the pretentious nature surrounding golf, and make it a fun accessible thing for everybody.”
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    News
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    Ocean Beach Street Fair & Chili Cook-Off Guide 2017
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