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    Summer fun with Bianca – Playing at Dog Beach in Ocean Beach and then a bath for Shila
    by BIANCA WEINSTEIN
    May 23, 2015 | 10085 views | 0 0 comments | 4 4 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Bianca and Shila at the Dog Beach in Ocean Beach.
    Bianca and Shila at the Dog Beach in Ocean Beach.
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    Bianca and Shila at Dog Beach Dog Wash in Ocean Beach.
    Bianca and Shila at Dog Beach Dog Wash in Ocean Beach.
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    Shila getting a bath from Bianca at Dog Beach Dog Wash in Ocean Beach.
    Shila getting a bath from Bianca at Dog Beach Dog Wash in Ocean Beach.
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    Bianca and Shila play at Ocean Beach's Dog Beach.
    Bianca and Shila play at Ocean Beach's Dog Beach.
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    Shila meets some friends at the Dog Beach.
    Shila meets some friends at the Dog Beach.
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    The other day, I was playing with my boxer Shila, and I thought it would be a great idea to take her to Ocean Beach's Dog Beach. I packed up the car and headed out to let her run around and play. Dog Beach is an off-leash beach located at the north end of Ocean Beach, and it is the only 24-hour dog beach in the San Diego area. Before we even got out of the car, Shila was already excited and wagging her little tail. Once her paws hit the sand, Shila was off running around, meeting the other dogs. She became instant friends with some golden retrievers and was having the time of her life running and chasing a ball into the water. After meeting all the friendly dogs, Shila was worn out and ready to take a nap. Before Shila could go home, I took her to Dog Beach Dog Wash to give her a bath. The dog wash is open seven days a week from 7 a.m. to 9 p.m., with the last dog wash 30 minutes prior to closing. The dog wash includes warm water, shampoo, a grooming mitt, washcloths, an apron, towels and a brush, all for just $14. For an additional $2.50, you can use a specialty shampoo, such as hypoallergenic, flea and tick (pyrethrin or neem), coat brightening (black, bronze or whitener), moisturizing shampoo and a few more choices depending on your dog's needs. If you want your dog's coat conditioned, you can use conditioners such as aloe vera, chamomile and oatmeal for an additional $2.50 and aloe remoisturizer for $3.50. After considering the shampoo choices and conditioners, I opted for the regular dog wash and began bathing Shila with the shampoo provided with the wash. Though she is a little baby when it comes to bath time, she was feeling much softer and looking very clean afterward. Dog Beach Dog Wash also offers other services for after the bath, such as a $3.50 blow dry or fluff-box dry, grooming table/Clipper-Vac ($5 per every 15 minutes) and nail trimming for $13. There are also toys and treats available for purchase in the store ranging from $1 up. Remember to always pick up after your pet and to keep Dog Beach clean. Dog Beach Dog Wash Where: 4933 Voltaire St. Contact: (619) 523-1700 or dogwash.com
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    Surfrider chair discusses San Diego chapter's role in maintaining beaches and bays
    by THOMAS MELVILLE
    May 20, 2015 | 11900 views | 0 0 comments | 5 5 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Surfrider Foundation San Diego County Chapter chair Mark West says, “That’s why we’re here.”
    Surfrider Foundation San Diego County Chapter chair Mark West says, “That’s why we’re here.”
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    About two weeks ago on the deck at Paradise Point Resort, just as the sun started to set over Mission Bay, Surfrider Foundation San Diego County Chapter chair Mark West looked over his right shoulder to see the golden hour glow growing. “See that? That's what it's all about,” he said, as he waved his arms toward the bay. “That's why we're here.” “Here” was at the Surfrider Foundation San Diego County Chapter’s 15th annual Art Gala, which raised $34,000 to help protect the region's coastline and directly benefit the organization’s education, outreach and advocacy directed at protecting local beaches. The event, which was held Friday, May 8, celebrated ocean advocacy while showcasing local artists and raising funds. “It was a thrill to see so many enthusiastic activists and supporters gathered for the event,” said new San Diego Chapter manager Mandy Sackett. While the activists and supporters bid on artwork, nibbled on orange chicken and drank Stone IPA, West was working the room making and re-establishing connections for the nonprofit. Right before sunset, the Beach & Bay Press caught up with him to discuss Surfrider and the role it plays in maintaining the area's coastal areas. BBP: How would you describe the Surfrider Foundation? Mark West: I would say that the Surfrider Foundation is all about making sure that each person can go to the beach, enjoy their day at the beach, spend their time in the ocean, spend their time in the waves, and have a great experience. This is a California treasure that so many people take for granted, but we don’t. We work to protect our oceans, waves, and beaches so everyone can use them. BBP: Why is the Surfrider Foundation important? MW: Our mission is to protect the ocean, waves, and beaches through a powerful activist network. What we do is we actually take all people who are passionate about our ocean, our beaches, our bays, and get together and really work toward cleaning them up, preventing pollution from getting into them. We even do stuff like ocean-friendly gardens where we’re thinking about the drought and how we can plant ocean-friendly gardens out there that are really California specific; they require no water, and they actually have less run-off as well. BBP: What does Surfrider do for the bays? MW: This bay (Mission Bay) has beaches all around it. We actually hold clean-ups right here in Mission Bay that are cleaning the beaches of litter before it gets into the bay. This is a large ecosystem that flows into our ocean, and if we can clean it here, then it cleans it out in our ocean, and we’ve worked really hard to make sure that we are removing pollution from this area. BBP: Do some people think Surfrider is just about surfers? MW: It’s funny, I don’t think people know that this is more than just surfers. I was a 24-year U.S. naval officer before I became the chair of Surfrider. We have all different kinds of people who are working for this because we are all very passionate about our ocean, waves, and beaches. It’s a group effort. I’ve got moms. I’ve got hipsters. I’ve got people who are all really into this group, and it’s all about people. BBP: How many members in the San Diego chapter? MW: We have about 5,000 active members, but in our email distribution list we have about 10,000 activists who are applying or involved in some form or another. Not everyone is cleaning the beaches. We have some doing web development. We have some people designing T-shirts. Everybody who has something that they’re passionate about, oceans, waves, and beaches, can come out and play a particular role in it. You don’t have to clean the beaches. Do other things. It’s all for the same good. BBP: What is the annual art gala? MW: The 15th annual art gala at Paradise Point in Mission Bay was a fantastic event. This event is our largest fundraiser that we have each year, so it’s really our biggest event that we hold, and we get all the people from all over San Diego to come out and talk about Surfrider. BBP: The funds you raise go where? MW: Right back into the protection of oceans, waves, and beaches. Every penny that we have goes right back into it. We do have a staff of two people, which for this group is nothing, but we have to make sure that we pay for the T-shirts, that we get the beach clean-up supplies. We have all these different things. This event really drives our entire year budget. So that’s why it’s so important for people come and help us out. BBP: Surfrider holds clean-ups and also has a specific program about getting the “butt” out? MW: We do beach clean-ups. San Diego is one of the largest chapters in Surfrider. We have 70 miles of beaches, which stretch from the border all the way up to San Clemente. Believe it or not, that’s part of our group. We take care of those 70 miles with programs such as “rise above plastics,” which is trying to reduce plastic that gets washed onto your beaches and carried to our beaches; and we have our “hold onto our butts” program. Cigarette butt pollution is the largest polluter of our beaches in our entire world. We get rid of those, we recycle them and turn them into money. BBP: How do you turn it (cigarette butts) into money? MW: There’s actually a company, out of Maryland, that is recycling the butts, and they either take them and turn them into furniture or certain things, and then they actually pay per pound. It’s not a ton of money, but they’re actually turning it into profits we can market back to our mission. BBP: What are some of the organizations Surfrider partners with? MW: We partner with a lot of local organizations including Wild Out Coast, which is down in the Imperial Beach area. We work with them on our No Border Sewage campaign, which is eliminating transborder pollution that is flowing from Mexico into our Imperial Beach area. We work with San Diego Coastkeeper, in fact the waterkeeper at Coastkeepers is on the board at Surfrider San Diego. So we have people all over that are in different organizations. We’re with I Love a Clean San Diego. A multitude of organizations. Really, it’s all about having people, all working toward a central goal. BBP: And that central goal is? MW: Protection of the ocean, waves, and beaches. BBP: What has Surfrider done to make a beachgoers experience more special? MW: Let me tell you about a story. Imperial Beac, where I live. In the 1970s one of the first real environment success stories of San Diego Surfrider happened. There was a proposal to build a mile long jetty at Imperial Beach. Literally rocks all the way down. We worked through our local governments to make sure that didn’t happen. I mean they were really taking the rocks out there. The majority of people, you go to the beach, you're just a normal ocean goer, we're protecting that by cleaning the beaches constantly. We have a huge network of people who go out and really work toward cleaning those beaches. So, you can take it for granted, but were gonna take care of it for you anyway. For more information, visit sandiego.surfrider.org or contact Chapter manager Mandy Sackett at mandy@surfridersd.org or (440) 749-6845.
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    CSAG unveils funding plan for new multi-use Chargers stadium
    May 18, 2015 | 7805 views | 1 1 comments | 2 2 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Included in CSAG’s plan is a $950 million proposed stadium designed by MEIS, a New York-based stadium design firm, that would take advantage of San Diego’s sunny and mild year-round climate.
    Included in CSAG’s plan is a $950 million proposed stadium designed by MEIS, a New York-based stadium design firm, that would take advantage of San Diego’s sunny and mild year-round climate.
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    Citizens' Stadium Advisory Group (CSAG) released its “Site Selection and Financing Plan for New Multi-Use Stadium in San Diego” on Monday, May 18. CSAG concluded a new multi-use stadium in Mission Valley is the most viable option, and would cost approximately $1.1 billion, excluding land. To pay for the facility, CSAG outlined more than $1.4 billion in revenue streams without increasing taxes. “Despite so many dramatic changes and potential distractions, both here and elsewhere over the last four months, our community rallied and kept moving forward,” said Mayor Faulconer. “San Diego now has a framework to build a new stadium that’s tangible, that’s achievable and that won’t raise taxes.” To pay for the proposed stadium, parking, stadium-related infrastructure and operations and maintenance, CSAG’s financing plan includes 60 acres of land from the City of San Diego valued at $180 million, and more than a dozen funding sources that exceed $1.4 billion, including: $300 million from the Chargers $173 million in bondable construction capital from the team’s rent. $200 million from the NFL. $121 million from the County of San Diego. $121 million from the City of San Diego. $225 million from the sale of 75 acres of land. More than $100 million from fans, who would contribute through the purchase of personal seat licenses (PSLs), and ticket and parking surcharges. “CSAG’s plan is the first chance the community has had to solve a problem that has existed since I first arrived in 2001. I hope the city, county and the Chargers use this plan as a basis to retain the team in the community it belongs,” said former Charger LaDainian Tomlinson. Included in CSAG’s plan is a $950 million proposed stadium designed by MEIS, a New York-based stadium design firm, that would take advantage of San Diego’s sunny and mild year-round climate. Stadium design veteran Dan Meis is the founder and managing principal at MEIS. He was the lead designer for the Staples Center in Los Angeles and two existing NFL stadiums – Paul Brown Stadium in Cincinnati and Lincoln Financial Field in Philadelphia. MEIS currently is working on renovations at Paul Brown Stadium and designing a new 60,000-seat soccer stadium in Rome, Italy called Stadio Della Roma that includes a mixed-use entertainment village similar to LA Live at Staples Center. "Unlike major league baseball that has been so successful in developing stadiums that are well integrated and evocative of their locations – Camden Yards in Baltimore, AT&T Park in San Francisco – NFL stadiums have been, for the most part, fairly generic architecturally,” Meis said. “We believe the design we created for the proposed stadium in San Diego will alter that trend by presenting a venue that truly embodies the city's landscape and spirit." In addition to the stadium, CSAG’s research led it to estimate that parking and stadium-related infrastructure would cost $204 million. The state-of-the-art venue would be home to the Chargers, San Diego State Aztecs, the Holiday and Poinsettia Bowls, and numerous other events – from corporate events to rodeos – that would help pay for operations and maintenance. CSAG released its financing plan at a news conference at the San Diego County Operations Center/Campus Center Chambers. As for the site selection, CSAG’s report says without Mission Valley a clear path to a stadium would not exist in San Diego. "Given the accelerated timeline the NFL and the Chargers established, the Mission Valley site emerged as the only option that leads to a ribbon cutting ceremony at a new stadium before the end of the decade," CSAG's report says. The city and the City’s Water Department own the land, valued at $180 million, and the 166-acre site has tremendous potential. CSAG also examined a downtown location, which proved to be unworkable for a variety of reasons outlined in the report. “From the beginning of this process you could tell this time was different, and CSAG’s plan confirms that,” said Rafael Alvarez, who heads Bolt Pride and helps lead Save Our Bolts, which represent more than 20,000 Chargers' fans. Now it’s time for the Chargers, the city and the county to finish what CSAG started. The Chargers belong in San Diego." - See more at: http://www.apexstrat.com/newsroom/press-releases/csag-lays-out-a-clear-and-workable-path-to-a-new-multi-use-stadium.html#sthash.XYLWCMz8.dpuf
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    labeach
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    May 22, 2015
    Pro Sports are like a weird drug...
    A Noble endeavor – Point Loma gardener adopts a plot in Balboa Park
    by DAVE SCHWAB
    May 16, 2015 | 6301 views | 0 0 comments | 4 4 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    The garden plot that John Noble got to enhance is located at the lily pond in front of the botanical building in Balboa Park. / Photo contributed
    The garden plot that John Noble got to enhance is located at the lily pond in front of the botanical building in Balboa Park. / Photo contributed
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    Peninsula gardener John Noble and his associates have adopted a garden in the heart of Balboa Park that was showcased in the recent May 9 “party of the century,” one of the major events of the park’s 2015 centennial celebration. “It has been the most wonderful experience of my life,” said Noble, who took part in support group Friends of Balboa Park’s Adopt-A-Plot program with the city’s Park & Recreation Department for the 2015 centennial. Professional landscape designers, horticulture and garden societies, businesses and volunteers have worked to create new landscapes for key areas of Balboa Park, including popular gardens in the Central Mesa, which are among the highlights of putting the best face on the park for its centennial. Noble and others among the Friends of Balboa Park group worked with city parks to get permission to “take over some of the park’s garden space that needed upgrading.” He said special permits were issued to contractors willing to revitalize the park’s landscaping. The Peninsula gardener was overjoyed at the plot he got to enhance in the park, which is located at the lily pond in front of the botanical building, one of the park’s most scenic and visited spots. “I feel like I won the lottery,” said Noble, noting, “It’s a wonderful opportunity to make this beautiful garden right in the heart of Balboa Park.” Noble said he has a vision to start a program “to teach kids about plants, the botanical language and nature.” He added it’s important to educate young people early on about the significance of plants and the relationship of different species to one another. Noble has helped out with the Point Loma Native Plant Garden as well as aiding with median plantings, a continuing project of the Point Loma Association, along Nimitz Boulevard and other community thoroughfares. Noble added there’s something “magical” about working with plants. “There is just something beautiful about nature,” he noted, adding, “Most every day I discover something new.” Noble’s getting recognition via a 2-inch logo on his adopted Balboa Park plot. He added it’s great exposure, pointing out that as many as 10,000 visitors a day have their pictures taken in Balboa’s picturesque gardens. “It’s been a very hard challenge to make it on that level,” said Noble of his garden, adding he’s had volunteers, including children, who’ve helped him with the monumental undertaking. The gardener said most of the storied park’s drought-tolerant gardens are “about reducing water, putting in perennials that need less water than the plants that are being taken out. The overall goal is for water education.” Noble started in November to get his Balboa Park garden plot ready for the May 9 Party of the Century, which was attended by the mayor and countless others. Noble noted the adopt-a-plot project isn’t just “a temporary, short-term thing for the centennial,” but instead is a “historical thing” meant to endure and reshape the park aesthetically, improving it for generations to come.
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    Summer fun with Bianca – dodging giant obstacles at VAVi's Wipeout Run
    by BIANCA WEINSTEIN
    May 14, 2015 | 15422 views | 0 0 comments | 7 7 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Bianca tries to negotiate the giant red balls obstacle. / Photo by Derek Arthurs
    Bianca tries to negotiate the giant red balls obstacle. / Photo by Derek Arthurs
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    Bianca gets ready to try new obstacles. / Photo by Derek Arthurs
    Bianca gets ready to try new obstacles. / Photo by Derek Arthurs
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    Participants get ready to attempt the Wipeout Run. / Photo by Derek Arthurs
    Participants get ready to attempt the Wipeout Run. / Photo by Derek Arthurs
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    Bianca balances on the Dope on a Rope obstacle at the Wipeout Run. / Photo by Derek Arthurs
    Bianca balances on the Dope on a Rope obstacle at the Wipeout Run. / Photo by Derek Arthurs
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    Bianca climbs through the Monkey Business obstacle at the Wipeout Run. / Photo by Derek Arthurs
    Bianca climbs through the Monkey Business obstacle at the Wipeout Run. / Photo by Derek Arthurs
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    Bianca swings over an obstacle.
    Bianca swings over an obstacle.
    Over this past weekend, the Pacific Beach-based company VAVi Sports & Social brought the game show “Wipeout” to a new level. The Wipeout Run is a 5k course featuring obstacles inspired by the hit TV show. The race is held each year at the Del Mar Fairgrounds ($10 parking fee) with start times anywhere from 7:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. For $65, you can have the “Wipeout” experience as seen on TV. VAVi started out as an adult recreation league for sports like kickball, flag football, and beach volleyball, and has since grown into a company with more than 90,000 active, young professionals from all over San Diego who come play on and off the field each year. The organization brings together fun, like-minded individuals with the perfect hybrid of top notch sports leagues and premier social events. VAVi also puts together large scale events such as the Heroes Brew Fest, Del Mar Mud Run and the Wipeout Run, which draws participants from all of San Diego County and beyond. The Wipeout Run event travels to 22 cities across the country; San Diego being one of those stops. The race includes 12 challenge obstacles: Dope on a Rope, Tumble Tubes, Monkey Business, Smash Wall, Foam of Fury, The Drop, Big Balls, Sky’s The Limit, Bubble Bash Swing, Sweeper, the infamous Wrecking Balls, and finally the four-story Happy Ending. Some of the obstacles were fairly hard to complete without taking a fall into the water. For instance, the Big Balls required you to cross a gap by jumping onto one of four large balls, had less than a 10 percent success rate. When I went through, one worker said that less than 10 people had made it through all day. Then there was the Wrecking Balls. In order to pass this obstacle, you had to run across a narrow bridge over a pool while two large wrecking balls swung back and forth. Move too quickly and you’ll lose your balance, move too slow and you’re sure to get taken out by the wrecking ball. At the end of the run, you get to make your way down the world’s largest inflatable water slide to your Happy Ending. Though you walk away from the Wipeout Run drenched, you leave knowing you had the “Wipeout” experience. Make sure you bring a towel and a change of clothes though, you’ll definitely need it afterwards! VAVi Sports & Social Where: 3453 Ingraham St. What: Founded in 2002, VAVi Sport & Social is the leading provider of adult sports leagues and large scale social and running events within the social sports industry. Info: (858) 273-3485, vavi.com and wipeoutrun.com
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    News
    City plans to upgrade unsafe crosswalk at Catalina/Canon in Point Loma
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    May 22, 2015 | 0 0 comments | 1 1 recommendations | email to a friend
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    Sports
    Three Sea Lions earn All-PacWest honors in golf
    Haley Fuller, Kathleen Crossley and Annika Nousiainen have all been voted to the All-PacWest Conference team by the league's coaches. Fuller picked up first team honors, while both Nousiainen and C...
    May 21, 2015 | 0 0 comments | 2 2 recommendations | email to a friend
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    Opinion
    Public’s needs should be the priority in South Mission Beach
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    May 22, 2015 | 0 0 comments | 2 2 recommendations | email to a friend
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    Arts & Entertainment
    After two decades, Kimm Rogers finds inspiration for new album
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    May 16, 2015 | 0 0 comments | 6 6 recommendations | email to a friend
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    Business
    San Diego’s microbrew industry featured on KPBS
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    May 21, 2015 | 0 0 comments | 4 4 recommendations | email to a friend
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    Obituaries
    Hats off to civic icon Esther Viti, 1932-2015
    Esther Viti, La Jolla’s “Hat Lady,” was impossible to miss. The chapeau-clad, wheelchair-bound Viti was omnipresent in the Jewel. She hosted community clean-ups and attended civic functions. She to...
    Apr 23, 2015 | 0 0 comments | 9 9 recommendations | email to a friend
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