Sdnews rss feed
    Ex-NTC site is no longer a best-kept secret
    by DAVE SCHWAB
    Sep 10, 2014 | 18485 views | 1 1 comments | 58 58 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    The redevelopment of Liberty Station into a sprawling civilianized complex entailed the restoration and preservation of historic buildings that were once the pride and joy of the venerable Naval Training Center before being shuttered during military base closures.    Courtesy photo
    The redevelopment of Liberty Station into a sprawling civilianized complex entailed the restoration and preservation of historic buildings that were once the pride and joy of the venerable Naval Training Center before being shuttered during military base closures. Courtesy photo
    slideshow
    The former Naval Training Center (NTC) site now known as Liberty Station is listed on the National Register of Historic Places, and many of its individual structures are designated as historic by the city of San Diego. Liberty Station’s multifaceted retail and commercial district is divided into five sections: The Marketplace, Ocean Village, NTC Landing, Harbor Square and Fitness Club. Anchor tenants of the retail and commercial districts include Vons, Trader Joe’s and Ace Hardware. There are several dozen restaurants, including several Starbucks coffee shops, and a variety of retail shops. In May 2013, Stone Brewing World Bistro and Gardens opened on Historic Decatur Road. Several of the retail establishments, including Vons and Stone Brewing, are built inside historic structures from Naval Training Center days. The Vons store occupies two separate buildings, formerly barracks, separated by an open courtyard. Stone Brewing incorporates multiple buildings, including the former mess hall. The NTC Promenade is a group of historic buildings being renovated for the display of arts, science, culture and technology. The educational district of Liberty Station consists of High Tech Village, a group of public charter schools collectively known as High Tech High. The campus includes five high schools, two middle schools and one elementary school. The residential district of Liberty Station has two main sections, one for military housing and the other a residential community developed by the McMillin Corporation. The military housing area includes 500 units, mostly townhomes, and also features children’s playgrounds and sports facilities. The exterior of the housing is in a Spanish architectural style in keeping with traditional San Diego. The civilian residential community includes townhomes, rowhomes and single-family houses. The hotel district of Liberty Station is designated for several hotels, currently including a Homewood Suites by Hilton and a Courtyard by Marriott. A large resort hotel by Nickelodeon is in the works. The office district is a collection of newly built office buildings whose architecture reflects the Spanish Colonial Revival style of the original NTC buildings. The Rock Church, a nondenominational, evangelical Christian  mega-church, was constructed in 2005 and opened in 2007. The building houses new Christian education facilities, office space and a 3,500-seat worship center, making it one of the largest auditoriums in Southern California. The church currently averages 12,000 in attendance per week, making it the largest church in San Diego. The Rock Church occupies the site of the former Technical Training Center at Service School Command San Diego.
    Comments
    (1)
    Comments-icon Post a Comment
    Steady
    |
    September 12, 2014
    Enjoyed Dave Scwab's article on LIBERTY Station. With all of the back & forth going on currently regarding lights for the Point Loma High School football field - why couldn't a multiuser facility be developed at Liberty Station with a lighted football field that could've used by Point Loma High School as well as other events. The area is more conducive to this type of activity/traffic flow and would seem to be a win-win for all.
    Liberty Station’s charm, history still fueling growth of 361-acre site
    by DAVE SCHWAB
    Sep 10, 2014 | 996 views | 0 0 comments | 5 5 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    With its seemingly endless venues, museums, arts, shopping and stunning panoramic views, Liberty Station is increasingly a major draw for concerts, entertainment, dance and community fundraisers. 
Courtesy photo
    With its seemingly endless venues, museums, arts, shopping and stunning panoramic views, Liberty Station is increasingly a major draw for concerts, entertainment, dance and community fundraisers. Courtesy photo
    slideshow
    Liberty Station hosts its share of community events like concerts and outdoor summer movie series for families. Courtesy photo
    Liberty Station hosts its share of community events like concerts and outdoor summer movie series for families. Courtesy photo
    slideshow
    In the 17 years since NTC Liberty Station closed as a military base and was reborn as a sprawling mixed-use civilian development, it has become one of the prime city venues for hosting public and private events of all kinds. “We host about 650 events per year, ranging in size from a meeting of 10 people up to large-scale, outdoor festivals for several thousand people,” said Barbara Ramsey, director of event sales for NTC venues at Liberty Station. Venue spaces available to rent on the former Naval base include The McMillin Event Center, Gallery 17 Event Center/Plaza, The Command Center, Luce Court/Legacy Plaza, North and South Promenade and Ingram Plaza.  Some of the larger organizations and events hosted at Liberty Station include ArtWalk, The Best of San Diego hosted by San Diego Magazine, Vin Diego, the Parkinson’s Walk and the Live Well San Diego 5K. “We also have The Dance Place Studios offering more than 600 dance classes annually, plus The North Chapel, which hosts more than 350 events — weddings, baptisms, concerts, military ceremonies and funerals — per year,” Ramsey said. Ramsey said the cost of renting out a portion of Liberty Station varies “depending on the venue space and for how long you would like to rent the space.”  Despite the large number of events already hosted at Liberty Station, there’s still room for expansion, said Liberty Station officials.  “While we have had two very successful years, we still have room for growth in the corporate market, social occasions and multi-day conferences,” said Ramsey. The 361-acre former Naval Training Center (NTC) offers much in the way of park and open-space areas, making it amenable for hosting events. There also is the historic Sail Ho Golf Course, which is San Diego’s oldest. Built in the 1920s as the Loma Club, it was recently renovated by Cary Bickler, who redesigned its fairways, greens and practice facilities. The nine-hole executive course features a pro-shop and the Sail Ho Bar & Grill. Liberty Station also has a 46-acre waterfront park with playground areas, plus a walking/jogging trail along the boat channel and an athletic club. Liberty Station’s large open areas makes it an attractive setting for numerous 5k walk/runs sponsored by local businesses and nonprofit organizations that have made the former base their home. “We’ve got it all: great value, unparalleled amenities, centrally located and plenty of complimentary parking,” said Ramsey. “The venues at NTC Liberty Station offer a slice of San Diego’s rich naval history coupled with spectacular surroundings that will make any meeting, conference, celebration, festival or wedding an event to remember.” Liberty Station is also full of fitness and therapy centers, as well as gyms and athletic clubs for all ages, including the Point Loma Sports Club, Therapy Specialists, Yoga Six, Fitness Without Walls, Fitness Together, San Diego Gymnastics, Riptide Soccer Club, Pilates By The Bay, Performing Arts & Athletics Restorative Training Specialists and Walkabout International. An aquatic center is also planned on 3.7 acres in the active space area of NTC Park. The city is in the process of approving a contract with an architect to begin the community input and design phase of that project.
    Comments
    (0)
    Comments-icon Post a Comment
    No Comments Yet
    Liberty Station officials continue to polish Arts & Culture District gem
    by DAVE SCHWAB
    Sep 10, 2014 | 820 views | 0 0 comments | 3 3 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    A view from inside the historic Luce Auditorium at Liberty Station. Luce has been long acknowledged to be a key element of Liberty Station’s redevelopment. 
Courtesy photo
    A view from inside the historic Luce Auditorium at Liberty Station. Luce has been long acknowledged to be a key element of Liberty Station’s redevelopment. Courtesy photo
    slideshow
    The NTC Arts & Culture District in Point Loma’s Liberty Station is building on a solid foundation after launching into a third phase of a long-term redevelopment project to transform the complex into a true regional arts and cultural center. “Phase 2 is completed with eight buildings done in 2012,” said Alan Ziter, executive director of the NTC Foundation, which was established in 2000 to renovate the 28-acre Arts & Culture District of the former Naval Training Center, turning it into a place where “innovative experiences” will inspire generations to come. “But the job’s not done,” said Ziter. “We’re hopeful that we can accomplish the bulk of the remainder of the project, the final 10 unrenovated buildings in the district, in what we are calling Phase 3. We are now in the planning and visioning phase of what we can do with the buildings and what the community needs that could take place in these buildings. Ideally, it will all happen in a single phase.” Noting that funding to renovate the buildings in the third phase “will be key,” Ziter estimated it will “cost $20 million to renovate them to a point where a tenant could move in and complete their build-out.” The 10 buildings in Phase 3 of the Arts & Culture District are: • The historic Luce Auditorium: a lease has been signed with a new tenant to be announced in early fall. • Four former Naval Training Center barracks buildings. • Three officers’ homes. • The former Navy Base Exchange Building. • The Gatehouse on Rosecrans Street. In November 2013, the NTC Foundation celebrated the completion of eight Phase 2 buildings, welcoming 14 new tenants ranging from art galleries to small design firms. In 1997, when the city took possession of the former NTC and named Corky McMillin as the master redeveloper, it also set aside 26 buildings on 28 acres as a civic arts and cultural district. Seven of the eight refurbished structures in Phase 2 redevelopment were former two-story barracks buildings. A total of 52,500 square feet of space was reconfigured into shops, studios, work spaces and offices that now house Ballast Point Gallery, Barracks 17 Event Center, Brandiose, California State Parks, Casa Valencia Galeria Baja, FlightPath Intaglio Studio, Point Loma Tea, Ron’s Shop, Studio E, Taylor Grace Designs, The Hot Spot! (pottery painting), the Women’s Museum of California and Yellow Book Road Children’s Books. Ziter said the second phase’s build-out has served its purpose, but added it has already been outgrown. “We are currently 98 percent leased in the renovated buildings,” he said. “So there is definitely more demand for space.” Ziter would not disclose details of the long-sought-after tenant for the Luce Auditorium — where the likes of Bob Hope and other entertainment giants of the day performed for recruits — other than to say, “A formal announcement will be made when preliminary plan reviews at the city are complete and there is more certainty about a timeline for renovations and opening.” Located on the west side of Truxtun Road north of Dewey Road, the 20,000-square-feet, 1,800-seat Luce Auditorium would appear to have ample space to be an anchor performance venue. But the site has several logistical “impediments” to be overcome, including no lobby space, wall-to-wall seating that is too deep and a stage that is too small and too high, as well as marginal acoustics and insufficient, out-of-date restrooms.  Luce Auditorium’s renovation, however, has been long acknowledged to be a key element of Liberty Station’s redevelopment, as it would provide resident groups a place to perform and could offer local film festivals a permanent home.
    Comments
    (0)
    Comments-icon Post a Comment
    No Comments Yet
    8,000 workers expected to attack 100+ sites for Coastal Cleanup Day on Sept. 20
    by STAFF AND CONTRIBUTION
    Sep 10, 2014 | 1542 views | 0 0 comments | 6 6 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Point Loma Boy Scout volunteers turn in their collected trash during a recent Coastal Cleanup Day at Ocean Beach Pier. Staff photo
    Point Loma Boy Scout volunteers turn in their collected trash during a recent Coastal Cleanup Day at Ocean Beach Pier. Staff photo
    slideshow
    Online volunteer registration is now open for Coastal Cleanup Day 2014, the largest single-day volunteer event in San Diego dedicated to protecting and preserving our local environment. The event will be held Saturday, Sept. 20. Volunteers of all ages are needed from 9 a.m. to noon at more than 100 coastal and inland sites to help preserve the local environment by cleaning up these outdoor areas. Interested volunteers can sign up for the cleanup online at www.CleanupDay.org.  Organized locally by environmental nonprofit I Love a Clean San Diego (ILACSD), Coastal Cleanup Day is part of the statewide Coastal Cleanup Day and International Coastal Cleanup, which has included more than 150 countries and 9 million volunteers since its inception more than 30 years ago. Locally, the event successfully brings together roughly 7,500 volunteers, local businesses, community organizations and government agencies, all working toward the same goal: a cleaner and healthier San Diego. The city’s Storm Water and Transportation Department launched a “Think Blue” campaign to prevent stormwater pollution. Each year, hundreds of tons of garbage end up on the beaches and in our waterways after traveling through San Diego’s vast watershed system. Best known for its beach cleanup sites, Coastal Cleanup Day reaches far beyond the beach, with more than 65 percent of sites located along the rivers, creeks, canyons and urban areas throughout San Diego County. Event organizers said cleaning up these inland sites prevents trash from reaching the coast, stopping pollution at the source.  In 2013, more than 9,700 volunteers (about 7,700 in San Diego County and 2,000 in Tijuana) removed nearly 171,000 pounds of trash and recyclables from San Diego County’s 11 watersheds. Trash removal is just one component of the annual event. Volunteers will also conduct storm-drain stenciling, invasive plant removal, native planting and graffiti removal. Another unique component of the event is the “on the water” cleanups that will take place at San Dieguito Lagoon and Shelter Island/San Diego Bay. ILACSD encourages San Diegans to come together for the event to improve the health of the environment and preserve the San Diego way of life for future generations. For a complete list of cleanup sites and to register to volunteer visit www.CleanupDay.org.  For more information, to volunteer or to donate, visit www.cleansd.org, or call (619) 291-0103.
    Comments
    (0)
    Comments-icon Post a Comment
    No Comments Yet
    Love ’em or not, wild parrots in OB making neighborhood nest egg
    by TONY de GARATE
    Sep 10, 2014 | 1582 views | 2 2 comments | 7 7 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Members of SoCal Parrot, a Jamul-based rescue group, addressed the Ocean Beach Town Council recently to enlighten residents on the history of transplanted wild parrots in OB — and, in some cases, about their endangered plight in other parts of the world where they are native. Photo by Tony de Garate
    Members of SoCal Parrot, a Jamul-based rescue group, addressed the Ocean Beach Town Council recently to enlighten residents on the history of transplanted wild parrots in OB — and, in some cases, about their endangered plight in other parts of the world where they are native. Photo by Tony de Garate
    slideshow
    For all their squawking, the wild parrots in Ocean Beach sure seem to enjoy it around here. And why not? Like most of their human counterparts, the parrots are not native. They came here from elsewhere and found Ocean Beach to their liking. The only real difference between them and your average out-of-towner is that when someone from New York or Chicago moves to Southern California, he eventually kind of blends in like your average Joe. Not the parrots. They’ve become rock stars. Think of the outcry that would result if, for some reason, a likeness of the iconic critter did not appear on the entryway sign that greets travelers on Sunset Cliffs Boulevard. Now, that would be something to squawk about. Yes, the creatures annoy with their untimely chattiness. But when a regional parrot advocate asked an audience of several dozen people if they were fond of the birds Aug. 24 at the monthly public meeting of the Ocean Beach Town Council, a room full of hands shot up without hesitation. Yet the admiration is not universal. A few months ago, an oddly grease-covered parrot was spotted beneath a bush at Sacred Heart Church in Ocean Beach. The wild animal was scooped up by a concerned citizen and eventually transferred to SoCal Parrot, a Jamul-based group that asked to address the Town Council. An X-ray revealed the critter had been shot once by a BB gun in a body-part area known as the flight girdle, rendering it permanently flightless. No one knows the reason for the shooting. But it’s unlikely the shooter knew this: the maimed bird — a red-crowned Amazon parrot — is a species in serious trouble. Fewer than 5,000 exist, said Amanda Plante, SoCal Parrot’s development and education director. The birds are thriving locally, but in their native northeast Mexico, populations are collapsing. An effort is under way to have the parrots listed as an endangered species, but so far, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service hasn’t budged the critter from candidate status, Plante said. As they become more abundant in Ocean Beach, Plante wants people to know of their plight and appreciate their presence here. “You guys have the power as Obeceans and residents of southern California to save a wild species,” she said. Southern California hosts a few other exotic parrots that can be found in Ocean Beach and are less threatened. But the condition of the red-crowned Amazon has degraded to the point that there are now more birds living outside their native habitat than in Mexico, Plante said. South of the border, the wild populations are threatened by habitat destruction and fragmentation and poaching, which fuels a burgeoning, black-market pet trade. So how did they get here? Though they have wings, they didn’t get to Southern California by flying. Some are stowaways aboard produce vessels, Plante said. Others were hastily released at the border by smugglers who lost their nerve at the last minute. Still others arrived in egg form, transported by smugglers wearing specialized shirts with multiple pockets. Plante dispelled the popular belief that parrots in Ocean Beach descended from a few individuals set free by pet owners. Some certainly did, but the sheer numbers indicate they also were transported, she said. Once in Ocean Beach, the birds thrive, dining on fruits of palm trees and other ornamental plants, Plante said. As for the crippled bird, SoCal Parrots decided surgery to remove the BB was too risky. The critter is being cared for as a member of the group’s “foster flock,” Plante said. The bird has proven to be quite ornery to its human guardians as it convalesces, which is a good sign. “He’s very much a wild animal. He has a lot of gumption. He does not like people, which is a great thing. That’s the way it’s supposed to be,” Plante said. The group continues to be on the lookout for the well-being of the birds — even making house calls at odd hours. “Sometimes we’ll get a call at 9:30 on a Saturday night about an injured, orphaned parrot,” Plante said. “There’s no one else doing what we’re doing.” More information is available at socalparrot.org. IN OTHER NEWS • Several residents describing themselves as longtime aficionados of the surf break north of the Ocean Beach Pier are complaining about being displaced by surf schools. “The pier has always been where advanced surfers go. It’s not fair for people who live here to have to put up with this,” said Howard Elliot, who said he has enjoyed the sport for more than a half century. The group suggested moving the schools to Dog Beach, a spot they said was less coveted and safer. • The OBTC’s Board of Directors will have a new look by the time it holds its next public meeting Sept. 24 at 7 p.m. at the Point Loma Masonic Lodge, 1711 Sunset Cliffs Blvd. Seven of the 15, two-year terms were up for grabs in annual elections that ended this week. Candidates and voters had to be dues-paying members as of Aug. 23 and live, work or own property in the 92107 ZIP code. The race attracted 10 candidates who briefly introduced themselves but a scheduled question-and-answer period was canceled in the interest of time. Results were not available at press time. • Private security hired by the Ocean Beach MainStreet Association to patrol around the pier parking lot and during special events has made a difference, said Chet Barfield, aide to San Diego District 2 City Councilman Ed Harris. So much so that Harris has pledged $8,000 in discretionary money known as Community Projects, Programs and Services funds to extend the patrol for several more months, Barfield said.
    Comments
    (2)
    Comments-icon Post a Comment
    dagobarbz
    |
    September 12, 2014
    Hey! It's time to get your tickets for SoCal Parrot's 2nd Annual Picnic with the Parrots - A Celebration of Eco-diversity!

    Sunday, October 26th 2014, (VIP Experience 10:30-Noon, Premium & General Admission Noon-4:30p).

    The day will feature unbelievable animal encounters, delicious fresh food, expert talks, community partner booths, live art, silent auction and raffles! Avian Behavior International, Jamul Town Brewery, Project Wildlife, House Rabbit Society - more and more partners are being announced in the coming days, but tickets are limited and prices will be increasing on Monday, Sept 15th - get yours before the price increase! Don't forget to tell your friends and family; like, comment and share to spread the word!

    Direct ticket link: https://secure.donationpay.org/socalparrot/picnic2014.php
    dagobarbz
    |
    September 12, 2014
    Hey! It's time to get your tickets for SoCal Parrot's 2nd Annual Picnic with the Parrots - A Celebration of Eco-diversity!

    Sunday, October 26th 2014, (VIP Experience 10:30-Noon, Premium & General Admission Noon-4:30p).

    The day will feature unbelievable animal encounters, delicious fresh food, expert talks, community partner booths, live art, silent auction and raffles! Avian Behavior International, Jamul Town Brewery, Project Wildlife, House Rabbit Society - more and more partners are being announced in the coming days, but tickets are limited and prices will be increasing on Monday, Sept 15th - get yours before the price increase! Don't forget to tell your friends and family; like, comment and share to spread the word!

    Direct ticket link: https://secure.donationpay.org/socalparrot/picnic2014.php
    News
    Study of coastal whales inaugurated by Navy
    The Navy has inaugurated a study to document the feeding, diving and travel habits of whales off the Southern California coast. The project, which began on July 31, involves Oregon State University...
    Sep 11, 2014 | 0 0 comments | 5 5 recommendations | email to a friend
    full story
    Sports
    Pointers split first two games of early gridiron season
    In Point Loma’s annual home-opening Kickoff Game on Sept. 6, the kickoffs weren’t the problem. But two crucial kicking-game errors cost the Pointers (1-1) dearly as they dropped a hard-fought 7-6 d...
    Sep 10, 2014 | 0 0 comments | 7 7 recommendations | email to a friend
    full story
    Opinion
    COUNCIL CORNER: Why I voted to increase the minimum wage in San Diego
    Last weekend I was outside the Trader Joe’s at Liberty Station where I met Pete. Pete is from Los Angeles and came down to San Diego to obtain signatures opposing the minimum-wage ordinance. I list...
    Sep 10, 2014 | 0 0 comments | 4 4 recommendations | email to a friend
    full story
    Arts & Entertainment
    Must Hear
    Anyone looking for the next big thing may want to check out the British rock duo Royal Blood, which opens for the Pixies on Sept. 27 at Humphreys Concerts by the Bay. The formation of the two-man b...
    Sep 17, 2014 | 0 0 comments | 2 2 recommendations | email to a friend
    full story
    Business
    Annual OB Pier Pancake Breakfast set to serve up family-friendly fun Sept. 20
    The family-friendly annual Ocean Beach Pier Pancake Breakfast, set to benefit the annual Ocean Beach Town Council’s Holiday Food and Toy Drive at the end of the year, will be held Saturday, Sept. 2...
    Sep 10, 2014 | 0 0 comments | 3 3 recommendations | email to a friend
    full story
    Obituaries
    James Freeman Gilbert, Scripps geophysics researcher, 83
    James Freeman Gilbert, Scripps geophysics researcher, 83 James Freeman Gilbert, a renowned professor emeritus of geophysics in the Cecil H. and Ida M. Green Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Ph...
    Aug 21, 2014 | 0 0 comments | 10 10 recommendations | email to a friend
    full story
    Current Issues(Archives)
    The Peninsula Beacon, September 11th, 2014
    download The Peninsula Beacon, September 11th, 2014
    The Peninsula Beacon, September 11th, 2014
    La Jolla Village News, September 5th, 2014
    download La Jolla Village News, September 5th, 2014
    La Jolla Village News, September 5th, 2014
    Beach & Bay Press, September 4th, 2014
    download Beach & Bay Press, September 4th, 2014
    Beach & Bay Press, September 4th, 2014
    The Peninsula Beacon, August 28th, 2014
    download The Peninsula Beacon, August 28th, 2014
    The Peninsula Beacon, August 28th, 2014
    Featured Events (see all events)