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    Pacific Beach may say adeus to Brazilian Day
    by DAVE SCHWAB
    Jun 29, 2015 | 6574 views | 0 0 comments | 4 4 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    The eighth annual Brazil Day in Pacific Beach scheduled for Sunday, Sept. 13 was nixed this year by the PB Special Events Committee.
    The eighth annual Brazil Day in Pacific Beach scheduled for Sunday, Sept. 13 was nixed this year by the PB Special Events Committee.
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    Nearly turned down a year ago because of problems with size, noise and accountability, the eighth annual Brazilian Day Festival in Pacific Beach scheduled for Sunday, Sept. 13 was nixed this year by the PB Special Events Committee. That decision has been appealed to the city, which will have the final say on whether or not the carnival-style parade with vibrant floats, extravagant costumes and energetic music, will be a go in PB or not this year. The popular four-hour Sunday festival features non-stop entertainment on two stages, including musical bands, dance ensembles, a food court, a vendor’s exhibition and a kids’ zone. “The Pacific Beach Special Events Committee is solely an advisory group,” noted committee chair Debbie Conca.  “Groups wanting to have an event in Pacific Beach are asked by the city to come to this group and present the logistics and details. This group denied the Brazilian Day Festival 5-2. The city can still approve or deny a permit with or without the endorsement of the Pacific Beach Special Events Committee.”    Brazilian Day spokesman Paulo Batuta was taken aback by the special events committee’s denial of the event, insisting his group has played by the rules and taken the community’s concerns about noise and other issues to heart. “We have documentation that shows we’ve addressed all issues and fixed pretty much everything,” Batuta said, noting parade organizers, in a partnership with PB Middle School, have also secured use of the school’s huge parking lot to handle event parking needs. Batuta said concerns about noise from live bands on stage was addressed by “pointing speakers down and turning them toward the street” to muffle noise. Previously, residents near the event had complained there was no one available to contact to register concerns that could be addressed on event day. “This time we have two phone numbers available to them,” Batuta said, adding private security, as well as police, will be on hand for crowd control. “We didn’t get any phone calls last year,” Batuta said. “Nobody complained about the noise.” Batuta said a survey was sent out recently that showed 25 percent of those attending Brazilian Day live in PB. “PB is our community, our little Brazil, we are home,” Batuta said. “That’s why it’s held in PB.” Pointing out Brazilian Day is alcohol-free and family friendly, Batuta argued that the event serves the community by “bringing business to PB, not just on this one day but all year.” “We’re part of this community,” said Batuta. “So there’s no reason to kick us out.” PB Special Events Committee member Michael Wagner noted several reasons why Brazil Day was not supported this year: • It’s grown in size from 5,000 to 50,000-plus and their website notes 60,000 are expected this year, even though at the committee meeting it was stated that “30,000” were expected. • The noise/bands have been a sore point for many years. Although they allege they have a "complaint phone number,” it has either no one to answer or no one to actually follow up on the complaints. • Streets for several blocks on each side of Garnet Avenue are packed and everything from churches to businesses have complained about parking. • Several businesses have alleged trash is left everywhere in front of their stores, people have blocked the businesses, and the event has more than 100 vendors, none of which are from PB. Several bars have complained that the day of the event is the first day of football, and they expect people coming into their places, but the event takes up the sidewalk and parking. • The committee expects some profit returned to the community. This event supports some group that has its office outside of PB and gives the proceeds to Brazilian groups outside of PB. No PB school/community group is in the parade or has a spot in the event. PB is not benefiting in anyway. Eve Anderson of the Pacific Beach Planning Group, noted the community has been having problems with events, like Brazilian Day, outgrowing the capacity of the community to deal with noise, parking and other problems associated with them. She said it dates back to the old PB “block party,” which simply got to be too big and unwieldy to cope with any longer. “A lot of us live here, a lot of us support businesses all over PB – but we all don’t take over the street,” Anderson said, noting the event itself, “if it were half the size and put on by a group affiliated with PB, then it might be OK.” But she noted the Brazilian group has been reluctant to move it off Garnet Avenue (the heart of town) or to a non-warm weather time of year (to reduce crowds). “It’s just time for it (Brazilian Day) to move,” Anderson concluded.
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    Ocean Beach woman raises the barre for dancewear
    by DAVE SCHWAB
    Jun 26, 2015 | 7425 views | 0 0 comments | 4 4 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Details Dancewear’s 2015 catalogue features eye-popping photography of young female dancers in action wearing dance costumes. / Photo contributed
    Details Dancewear’s 2015 catalogue features eye-popping photography of young female dancers in action wearing dance costumes. / Photo contributed
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    Dancer Chloe East models the morning mist top, seafoam low briefs and butterfly skirt from Details Dancewear. / Photo contributed
    Dancer Chloe East models the morning mist top, seafoam low briefs and butterfly skirt from Details Dancewear. / Photo contributed
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    Darlene Langford of Ocean Beach started out as a dance mom who “corrected” a flaw in her daughter’s costume, which she described as a “disaster.” Little did she realize then that it would be the start of a brand new career. “I rescued those costumes, and slowly over time, I started doing the studio teacher’s costumes for her kids,” Langford said. “Then I started doing the whole studio, one-of-a-kind, made-to-order dancer’s costumes, very fancy with lots of patterns.” Pointing out she “went to school for engineering and physics,” Langford said, when asked if she “fell” into dancewear, that it was more like, “It pulled me in, dragging (laughing). Every year (thereafter) I would say, ‘I won’t do it next year.’ But once you build a reputation — you get phone calls and people want you to do their costumes.” During that summer off-season, Langford converted lots of leftover fabric into boxes and boxes of finished dance costumes, which prompted her to open her Del Mar dancewear boutique, and later, a manufacturing center in the Rock and Roll San Diego building at 3360 Sports Arena Blvd., Suite A, in the Midway area. “I just did everything (at first), all the sewing too,” said Langford, adding, “Then I couldn’t keep up, and I had to start hiring people.” But there were two things Langford wanted out of her new enterprising dancewear venture: complete control, and no outsourcing of operations overseas. “It’s strictly family run and local — and it’s going to stay that way,” Langford pledged about Details Dancewear, noting her core company comprised herself, her two daughters and a niece. “It’s just us four running this shop,” said Langford, who added, “I never foresee a time that I would send my stuff to China or Indonesia (to be manufactured). I wouldn’t do it.” Noting she’s “not trying to compete” with the big boxes, Langford said, even though it would be cheaper to outsource labor overseas. She added, “all my people live in San Diego, not in China, and we can’t live off $5 a day. I pay my people well even though it makes my profit margin smaller. How much profit do you really need as long as you can keep growing your business?” Being in control also means being able to personally guide her dancewear business. “It’s like steering a big ship,” explained Langford. “When you’re smaller, you can change direction very quickly, come up with ideas faster, produce them and put them out there faster than anybody else.” The Langfords are branding Details Dancewear as “eye-catching costumes for the dancer and dance competitor which are designed and constructed in San Diego which transition easily from studio to stage.” The company’s 2015 catalogue features eye-popping photography of young female dancers in action wearing dance costumes. The collection is being billed as “a glimpse into the fantasy world of light and dark through movement, traveling from the autumn woods to the summer beaches.” Details Dancewear designs, manufactures and distributes clothing for dancers of all ages. But the heart of the dancewear market is young women ages 9 to 14. Langford doled out special praise to her young models, like Chloe East from Orange County, who’ve participated in her annual catalogue collection. “Some of these girls are famous; they have followings of thousands,” noted Langford, adding, “People like her and my daughter doing social media are helping ‘climb’ the business. Every day, more and more people come, and our company becomes more popular.” What’s next for Langford and Details Dancewear? “It gets bigger,” answered Langford. “I want to be big — and local. I’ll find a way to do it.”  For more information visit www.detailsdancewear.com.
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    Timeline uncertain for passage of Ocean Beach Community Plan
    by TONY de GARATE
    Jun 25, 2015 | 1686 views | 1 1 comments | 3 3 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Supporters say the new Ocean Beach Community Plan will make it harder to obtain variances to OB’s strict land development code, such as the ones granted to these property owners in the 5100 block of West Point Loma.                                                    PHOTO BY TONY de GARATE
    Supporters say the new Ocean Beach Community Plan will make it harder to obtain variances to OB’s strict land development code, such as the ones granted to these property owners in the 5100 block of West Point Loma. PHOTO BY TONY de GARATE
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    To demonstrate how long advocates have been fighting for a new Ocean Beach Community Plan, a city document intended to guide growth and protect quality of life over the next 20 years, Gio Ingolia simply cast an index finger toward his bald pate. “When this all started,” said Ingolia, who along with local businesswoman Mindy Pellissier co-chairs a committee that has shepherded the plan since 2002, “I had hair.” Ingolia’s ability to maintain a sense of humor throughout the 13-year process belies this fact: Even as the plan is scheduled to be heard in August in San Diego by the California Coastal Commission, the entity that has final say over the plan, much uncertainty remains over what the plan will look like and when the plan will finally be approved. The point was underscored June 3 during a presentation from Karen Bucey, associate planner for the city’s Planning Department, who introduced herself at the monthly meeting of the Ocean Beach Planning Board. “Our goal is to get the plan approved in August,” said Bucey, the third planner the city has assigned to manage the document in the last two years. “But that’s a best-case scenario. There are still some open issues.” For the last 11 months, most have assumed approval of the plan, which supporters say would preserve OB’s small-town, beach-community feel and guard against bulky, out-of-scale development, was imminent, and with good reason. Last July 29, with more than 80 OBceans representing eight different community groups on record in support of the plan looking on, the San Diego City Council approved the plan by a 9-0 vote. It was an especially big victory for supporters because the council voted to include tough-talking language designed to discourage variances to Ocean Beach's unusually strict land development code – language the San Diego Planning Commission had fought to have stricken. That language seeks to strengthen and protect what supporters consider the community’s crowning jewel: a restriction known as the .7 FAR rule, which limits the square footage of nearly all residential housing west of Sunset Cliffs Boulevard to 70 percent of lot size, or floor-area ratio, and further requires 25 percent of that amount to be set aside for enclosed parking. Except in Point Loma, the same zoning throughout the rest of San Diego allows 120 percent of FAR. But even before the City Council’s approval, Coastal Commission staff wrote the city asking for changes in seven areas of the plan. At the time, members of then-District 2 City Councilman Ed Harris’ staff characterized the differences as “nonserious.” Because of personnel changes at the city’s Planning Department and other reasons, little progress has been made in the ensuing months to resolve the differences. But Bucey said she plans to knuckle down and come to an agreement with the Coastal Commission in time for the August hearing. “I’m excited to be working on this project,” she said. Bucey conceded if the city and Coastal Commission cannot resolve their differences before the hearing, things could get messy. The commission would likely defer to its own staff and vote to change the plan per its recommendations. The San Diego City Council would then have to vote on the plan all over again, she said. The worst-case scenario would be if the City Council did not accept the Coastal Commission’s changes and an impasse would ensue. “We’d have to re-think it entirely,” Bucey said. She said many of the differences can be resolved through minor changes in city code and the Coastal Commission might be persuaded to approve the plan with a promise to make those changes. But Pellissier, the Ocean Beach Town Council’s 2014 “Citizen of the Year” for her work on the plan, was concerned. If the Coastal Commission did not accept such a deal, it could take two years to amend city code. “In the meantime, we’re stuck with the old plan,” said Pellissier, referring to the original 1975 Ocean Beach Precise Plan, the oldest planning document in the city. “We’d be holding back 98 percent of the plan, so all our work means nothing. That’s hard to take,” she said. Planning Board Chairman John Ambert told Bucey the community is counting on her to work out the kinks in a transparent manner. “You’re our knight in shining armor for this,” he said. A community plan address all aspects of community development including housing, transportation, commercial and industrial development, public facilities and environmental issues, according to the city’s website. Bucey said she would provide two more monthly updates before the August Coastal Commission hearing. The next OBPB meeting is July 1 at 6 p.m. at the Ocean Beach Recreation Center, 4726 Santa Monica Ave.
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    Cat310
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    June 27, 2015
    Build baby build!!!!

    Knock down those shacks and reinvest in a new Ocean Beach.
    Plenty of pyrotechnics to see in San Diego on the Fourth
    by DAVE SCHWAB
    Jun 25, 2015 | 18236 views | 0 0 comments | 3 3 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Fireworks from SeaWorld over Mission Bay as seen from Crown Point Park. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    Fireworks from SeaWorld over Mission Bay as seen from Crown Point Park. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    slideshow
    Fourth of July is all about fireworks, and residents and visitors alike to Mission and Pacific beaches are fortunate in that they have their choice being situated at the “epicenter” of three dazzling local displays: off Ocean Beach Pier, in La Jolla Cove and at SeaWorld San Diego. San Diego beaches are packed with people on the three key summer holiday weekends — Memorial Day, the Fourth of July and Labor Day — with July 4th typically being the busiest of all with nearly one million people expected to hit the beaches. But after a day of fun in the sun, once the waves have been conquered and the barbecues dinners have been devoured, it’s time for pyrotechnics. At which time, coastal residents and guests can please their patriotic palates with pyrotechnics from Point Loma to La Jolla. PB, MB SeaWorld San Diego has nightly fireworks on numerous evenings throughout the summer. But July 4 is special, as the theme park hosts its “Independence Day Fireworks Spectacular,” offering an extended pyrotechnic display over Mission Bay set to patriotic music commencing at 10:10 p.m. with fireworks set to go off at 10:30 p.m. and last approximately 17 minutes. The best places to watch are Crown Point Park, Ski Beach, and Fiesta Island. Ocean Beach Ocean Beach’s spectacular fireworks display at 9 p.m. is the community’s official kick-off to summer. Free parking is offered at both the main beach and pier parking lots. Spend the day picnicking with family and friends, swimming in the ocean, walking and playing in the sand and shopping along Newport Avenue. Then bundle up as the sun sets and pull up a chair for a spectacular fireworks show from the OB Pier. And don't forget your radio so you can hear the fireworks soundtrack being broadcast simultaneously during the show. Gone from OB Fourth fireworks in 2015 is the unregulated tradition of the “marshmallow war,” which had been fought after the fireworks show on the beach and streets leaving the community a sticky mess. In 2014, Ocean Beach Town Council, answering an overwhelming call from residents and merchants, responded with its successful “Mallow Out” campaign discouraging the marshmallow war, which led to a 90 percent reduction in the goo. La Jolla There’s no question that the 30th annual Fourth of July fireworks show in La Jolla Cove is a go this year. But there almost wasn’t a 29th annual celebration, as the display was cancelled — then saved — at the 11th hour in 2014. Subject to on-again, off-again flaps over donations and environmental concerns the past several years, all of that is in the rear-view mirror now as La Jolla Village Merchants Association (LJVMA), the community’s Business Improvement District (BID), has taken the special event under its wing. “David Marino of Hughes Marino, a La Jollan who’s been a supporter for years, stepped in and helped me get annual commitments, around $45,000 or $46,000, to cover costs,” said Deborah Marengo, who’s organized and promoted the event since restaurateur George Hauer, who originated the display, stepped down a few years ago. “Now any extra money raised for the fireworks will be rolled over into the next year.” Marengo said the 25-minute Cove fireworks display will start at 9 p.m. Supporting sponsors for the La Jolla Cove Fireworks Display are Hughes Marino, George's at the Cove, La Jolla Beach & Tennis Club, La Jolla Cove Suites, La Valencia Hotel, Willis Allen, Leo Loves Fireworks, J. Todd Figi, John Barbey and Steven Black. A few other choices for fireworks on Independence Day: • Old Town San Diego State Historic Park is hosting a free, old-fashioned Fourth of July celebration from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

 Guests are encouraged to participate in the parade around the plaza reminiscent of the July 4th parades of early San Diego with music, animals, banners and people in historical costumes. There will be crafts, games, contests and informational demonstrations that represent the activities enjoyed in the 1800s. The stage will be filled with free entertainment such as historic dancing and early American music. Pie-eating contests begin at 3 pm. The event will end with a boom — literally. All of the museums will be open and, as always, free to the public. • What better place is there to spend Independence Day than at the San Diego County Fair at 2260 Jimmy Durante Blvd. in Del Mar? Highlighting the day will be the traditional fireworks display at 9 p.m., which is visible throughout the Fairgrounds. The Grandstand schedule: 9:30 a.m. patriotic opening ceremony outside O’Brian Gate; 6:45 p.m., World Memorial Tribute to 9/11; 7 p.m., Hometown Heroes Parade; 7:30 p.m., Navy Band Southwest; and 9 p.m. fireworks; 9:30 p.m., Dana Carvey performs on the Grandstand Stage. • Another prime spot to celebrate the Fourth of July will be at the Maritime Museum of San Diego again this year. The observation deck of the museum’s historic 1898 steam ferry Berkeley provides a spectacular view of the fireworks show over San Diego Bay. A delicious BBQ dinner will be provided at two seatings from 5-6:30 p.m. and 7-8:30 p.m. Fireworks viewing are included with museum admission. For more information and reservations call 619-234-9153 ext. 101 or visit www.sdmaritime.org. • The annual Big Bay Boom launches fireworks from four barges and can be seen from multiple locations along San Diego Bay, including Harbor Island, Shelter Island, the Embarcadero area, and the Seaport Village/Coronado landing starting at 9 p.m. • Oscar- and Emmy Award-winning conductor Bill Conti will lead the Star Spangled Pops in a San Diego Symphony concert of all-American hits, followed by a military tribute and a fireworks display at Embarcadero Marina Park South
 starting at 7:30 p.m.
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    Local teens to receive 25 free surfboards
    by DAVE SCHWAB
    Jun 25, 2015 | 2206 views | 0 0 comments | 1 1 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Point Loman Carter Faucher has teamed with North Island Credit Union to donate more than 25 surfboards and $7,500 to Boys to Men (BTM), a nonprofit mentoring fatherless teenage boys.
    Point Loman Carter Faucher has teamed with North Island Credit Union to donate more than 25 surfboards and $7,500 to Boys to Men (BTM), a nonprofit mentoring fatherless teenage boys.
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    Point Loman Carter Faucher has teamed with North Island Credit Union to donate more than 25 surfboards and $7,500 to Boys to Men (BTM), a nonprofit mentoring fatherless teenage boys. The donation will support the organization’s sixth annual 100 Wave Challenge, a fundraising surf-a-thon in September. The fundraiser’s goal is for each participant to raise at least $1,000 while attempting to surf 100 waves in 12 hours. Surfers raising upward of $1,000 are rewarded with prizes and incentives. Faucher, a surfer himself whose mother is employed with the credit union, has been supporting the 100 Wave Challenge since 2013. When he found out the credit union had excess surfboards available after a recent remodel of its 10 branches around the county, he asked North Island to donate them to the BTM program. “The organization (BTM) has really been generous in helping boys without fathers in their struggles to be successful at school and in social situations,” said Faucher. “I’m a student, and I heard about surfboards being available at my mother’s bank. So I worked to help get leashes and fins put on them and get them donated through the credit union.” Steve O’Connell, president/CEO of North Island Credit Union, was glad to donate to such a worthy cause. “We were honored to give these surfboards to the young men who have Boys to Men mentors teaching them how to surf,” he said. “We thought giving these to the promising surfers within this program to use during the 100 Wave Challenge was the perfect fit.” After learning more about the program, O’Connell felt compelled to add a $7,500 donation to support BTM. Faucher and North Island took the credit union’s donated surfboards to Joe Roper of Roper’s Custom Surfboard & SUP Repair to have them refurbished at no charge. The boards will be available for the boys to use during BTM’s weekly surf nights, which started June 23. Though seemingly a small donation, BTM founder/mentor Joe Sigurdson said a surfboard can mean a lot to a disadvantaged youth from a fatherless family. “We have hundreds of kids in the program who don’t begin to have the resources to purchase anything close to a surfboard,” said Sigurdson. “Having their own board impacts them emotionally, aiding them positively with their self-esteem, helping them to feel good about themselves. This gift is going to impact and excite 12-year-old boys who don’t have anything in their lives. This is like getting a new bike — or a new drum set. It’s cool, exciting and fun.” BTM’s surf-a-thon accounts for 60 percent of the nonprofit’s annual budget, which has doubled since the first event six years ago. The event raised $320,000 in 2014 and $200,000 in 2013. The goal this year is $500,000. The organization plans to sign up as many as 400 surfers for this year’s event, compared with 165 in 2014.
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    News
    Getaway driver released in spree of 11 robberies
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    Jul 02, 2015 | 0 0 comments | 2 2 recommendations | email to a friend
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    Sports
    Over-The-Line gets back in the swing of things
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    Jul 01, 2015 | 0 0 comments | 3 3 recommendations | email to a friend
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    Opinion
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    Jun 29, 2015 | 0 0 comments | 2 2 recommendations | email to a friend
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    Arts & Entertainment
    Marco Renteria and his Jazz Quartet at Dizzy’s
    Tribute band fans will want to check out the aptly named Smells Like Nirvana, performing at the 710 Beach Club on Friday, July 3. Though it’s been 11 years since frontman Kurt Cobain’s passing, the...
    Jul 01, 2015 | 0 0 comments | 6 6 recommendations | email to a friend
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    Business
    Short-term vacation rental firm Pillow opens in San Diego
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    Jun 26, 2015 | 0 0 comments | 3 3 recommendations | email to a friend
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    Obituaries
    Sally Thornton, 81; philanthropist funded UCSD teaching hospital
    San Diego philanthropist Sally Bullard Thornton, 81, died June 12 at UCSD Medical Center. Thornton reportedly became ill a month ago and had been in a coma since then. A San Diego native, Thornton ...
    Jun 15, 2015 | 0 0 comments | 5 5 recommendations | email to a friend
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