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    Visitors gain glimpse at the historic Cabrillo Lighthouse close up
    Aug 28, 2014 | 12017 views | 0 0 comments | 2 2 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    An estimated 573 guests swarmed the historic Cabrillo Lighthouse on Aug. 25 for a rare opportunity to explore the top of the lighthouse during a free admission day as part of the National Park Service’s 98th birthday celebration. Photos by Jim Grant
    An estimated 573 guests swarmed the historic Cabrillo Lighthouse on Aug. 25 for a rare opportunity to explore the top of the lighthouse during a free admission day as part of the National Park Service’s 98th birthday celebration. Photos by Jim Grant
    slideshow
    An estimated 573 guests swarmed the historic Cabrillo Lighthouse on Aug. 25 for a rare opportunity to explore the top of the lighthouse during a free admission day as part of the National Park Service’s 98th birthday celebration. Photos by Jim Grant
    An estimated 573 guests swarmed the historic Cabrillo Lighthouse on Aug. 25 for a rare opportunity to explore the top of the lighthouse during a free admission day as part of the National Park Service’s 98th birthday celebration. Photos by Jim Grant
    slideshow
    Park Service volunteers and docents appear in period dress, answering guests’ questions about life in the 19th century. 	 Photos by Jim Grant
    Park Service volunteers and docents appear in period dress, answering guests’ questions about life in the 19th century. Photos by Jim Grant
    slideshow
    An estimated 573 guests swarmed the historic Cabrillo Lighthouse on Aug. 25 for a rare opportunity to explore the top of the lighthouse during a free admission day as part of the National Park Service’s 98th birthday celebration. Photos by Jim Grant
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    New school year ushers in plenty of campus changes for students and staff
    by DAVE SCHWAB
    Aug 28, 2014 | 569 views | 1 1 comments | 2 2 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    School buses will be rolling back to local campuses on Tuesday, Sept. 2 with the resumption of classes in the Point Loma Cluster of Schools. 			Photo by Paul Hansen
    School buses will be rolling back to local campuses on Tuesday, Sept. 2 with the resumption of classes in the Point Loma Cluster of Schools. Photo by Paul Hansen
    slideshow
    It’s a fresh start to a new school year beginning Tuesday, Sept. 2 for the nine institutions of the Point Loma Cluster of Schools (PLCS) in the San Diego Unified School District (SDUSD). The PLCS became a reality in 2006, when parents, teachers and principals from each school engaged in a strategic planning process to develop a unified vision. The cluster’s primary objective is to increase communication between and coordinate the efforts of its schools, thus supporting the development of the cluster into an outstanding, cohesive K-12 environment for Point Loma and Ocean Beach youth. The PLCS includes Point Loma High School and Correia and Dana middle schools, as well as Silver Gate, Cabrillo, Dewey, Loma Portal, Sunset View and Ocean Beach elementary schools. “We have some great things happening in our cluster this school year,” said Suzy Reid, incoming president of the PLCS Foundation. “We are welcoming two new principals — Irene Hightower at Cabrillo Elementary and Rebecca Penh at Loma Portal Elementary — and OB Elementary is getting a facelift with a new coat of paint,” she said. Penh said she, in turn, is excited to hit the ground running. “It is my sincere pleasure and honor to join a wonderful and caring staff at a school that is known for its dedication to academic excellence,” Penh said. “I look forward to working collaboratively with you to provide the best educational experiences for all of our students.” An SDUSD product, Penh graduated from Mira Mesa High and San Diego State University before starting her career as a classroom teacher at Walker Elementary School. She later did a stint as interim vice principal at Central Elementary School, where she worked with more than 900 students and co-led more than 50 educators. “I am a firm believer in the importance of building strong relationships with parents, staff and students,” said Penh. “I am dedicated to spending a majority of my time visiting classrooms and getting to know the students while supporting their learning. I cannot think of a better place to work than Point Loma, a tight-knit community with members who care about students and public education.” Penh can be reached at (619) 223-1683 or by email at rpenh@sandi.net. Moira Clark, vice president of the nonprofit Loma Portal Foundation, which raises money for the elementary school, said this year is a milestone in the school’s history. “Loma Portal Elementary is celebrating its centennial,” Clark said. “We will be having events throughout the school year and community members are welcome.  Our first event is ‘Living History Day,’ Oct. 2, where you can experience a day of school as it was in 1914.” To keep up with Loma Portal’s centennial events, email lomaportal100@gmail.com. There are also some great things happening academically in the Point Loma Cluster, said Reid.  “Principals are working together to coordinate professional development for each grade level in the cluster,” Reid said. “Teachers are working on new Common Core Curriculum and sharing best practices to create a more streamlined K-12 alignment.” Reid said new construction projects in the cluster include joint-use fields at Dana and Correia Middle School and ongoing updates and improvements at Point Loma High. “In December, we’ll get a new School Board trustee, Mike McQuary, who we look forward to working with,” Reid said. Outgoing San Diego Unified School District trustee Scott Barnett, whom McQuary will be replacing, said he is optimistic about the district’s fortunes in the upcoming school year. “We’re obviously excited about the start of our new year, and our superintendent (Cindy Marten) is putting more rigor into our education system and making sure principals spend more time in the classroom observing and supporting teachers,” said Barnett, adding more good news is that class sizes in SDUSD’s lower grades “should be back down to a ratio of 24 students to one teacher.” But Barnett also warned some storm clouds are lingering on SDUSD’s financial horizon. “The district still has a $115 million structural deficit,” he said, noting assets are to be sold off to cover half of that shortfall. “Hopefully, the financial situation will balance out.” Field improvements are perhaps the biggest change under way in Point Loma in the 2014-15 school year. “We will break ground on the new $10 million Correia sports complex by December,” Barnett said. “The newly turfed Dana Field, with no lights, should be up by the first of the year.” Hans Becker, now in his sophomore year as Point Loma High principal, said the school is “committed as educators to see all students succeed and be ready for the world the day after graduation. “Excellent teaching at all levels [of the Point Loma Cluster] gives students a wide range of opportunities in our diverse programs,” said Becker. “… Many of our students will have jobs that do not even exist currently. So our mandate is to develop learners who are active, adaptive, thoughtful and engaged.” Coastal schools, including Point Loma’s, are part of the San Diego Unified School District (SDUSD), the second-largest school district in the state, serving more than 132,000 students in 223 educational facilities. The district includes 116 elementary schools, 24 middle schools, 26 high schools, 44 charter schools and 14 atypical/alternative schools. Besides being one of the largest districts in the state, the SDUSD is also one of the most diverse, representing more than 15 ethnic groups and more than 60 languages and dialects. PLHS IMPROVEMENT PLAN, STADIUM LIGHTING CONTINUE TO HINGE ON EIR DOCUMENT A field-use policy is now in place for the long-awaited environmental impact report (EIR) on a master plan for Point Loma High School (PLHS), which includes a controversial proposal for stadium lighting, once the EIR is complete. That’s the next chapter to be written in the vetting of a PLHS long-range site master plan revision now under way, which proposes providing the previously unlit PLHS athletic fields with permanent field lighting. “We are going through the process of finalizing the input on the EIR,” said outgoing SDUSD trustee Scott Barnett. “The FAA (Federal Aviation Administration) has to give input on the lights, most likely height,” he said. “Once that’s done, staff will issue a draft EIR for final public comment and review. Then we’ll certify the EIR in its final form, hopefully before my last board meeting on Dec. 8.” Meanwhile, on July 29, the SDUSD Board of Education unanimously approved the field-use policy for Point Loma High School. That policy sets forth districtwide procedures for the use of athletic fields and lighted stadiums, including prioritization for times and manner of use, as well as providing measures to mitigate negative impacts to the community.  The field-use policy for PLHS is the first of several site-specific field use policies which will be brought forward by staff as athletic fields are upgraded and stadium lighting is added to fields. New PLHS stadium lighting would consist of four towers, each 90 feet high, allowing for maximum lighting of the field and minimal spillover into nearby properties, school officials said. But not everyone is convinced PLHS stadium lighting is necessary — or beneficial. Two factions, pro-lights Progress for PLHS (PPLHS), and anti-lights Pro Point Loma (PPL), have been lobbying for and against athletic-field lighting for months via websites and Facebook pages, as well as through colorful lawn signs. The anti-light PPL argues that the school district is on a fast track to turn the high school stadium into a rentable sports venue, commercializing the stadium and turning it into a revenue-generator for the school district while detracting from the high school’s educational mission. Pro-lights PPLHS answers that PLHS is one of only three of 15 high schools in SDUSD without field lighting and that providing it would benefit all student groups, including band, ROTC and others, whose needs now must be accommodated offsite. Barnett said the goal of both the new field policy and the PLHS master plan is to ensure “Point Loma has parity with athletic fields at 15 other high schools and at the same time be the best neighbor we can.” In his view, Barnett said “the needs of Point Loma students outweighs inconvenience to a handful of neighbors a couple of dozen times a the year.” Barnett said he’s confident PLHS’s stadium lighting and athletic-field policy are “supported by the overwhelming majority of the Point Loma community.” For the latest information on developments with the planned improvements, visit www.pointlomacluster.com/-apps/news/show_news.jsp?REC_ID=390009&id=0.
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    farrell123
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    August 29, 2014
    Re. Scott Barnett's view "the needs of Point Loma students outweighs inconvenience to a handful of neighbors a couple of dozen times a year."

    1. We are more than a handful of neighbors, we have hundreds in our group now. The effect of lighting the stadium is more than an "inconvenience". It will seriously affect our standard of living here as well as our property values. PL high school student's ability to play sports at night under artificial light instead of during the day is not more important than our rights as home owners and tax payers.

    2. The newly adopted field use policy calls for 18 nights a year, not "a couple of dozen". So already we can see that Scott Barnett and the school board will not comply with this policy and it hasn't even been implemented yet...

    3. A new Correia sports complex is breaking ground soon and can serve any additional needs for students without impacting residents to the degree it will at PLHS.

    4. Your article points out there is a $115 million structural deficit, which "hopefully" will balance out with selling off assets. That's pretty ambiguous and why are we spending so much money on sports venues when the campus at PLHS has other issues which are more important to the academic needs of students? How many voters thought so much money and priority would be given to school sports when they voted for propositions to improve school facilities? That's not what I thought I was voting for.

    City’s plan to uproot illegal pot shops is a slow, arduous process
    by DAVE SCHWAB
    Aug 28, 2014 | 710 views | 0 0 comments | 2 2 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    City officials and police are continuing efforts to shut down medical-marijuana dispensaries that are still operating and those that have recently emerged, but the process is painfully slow and full of litigation.				                               Staff photo
    City officials and police are continuing efforts to shut down medical-marijuana dispensaries that are still operating and those that have recently emerged, but the process is painfully slow and full of litigation. Staff photo
    slideshow
    Even with a new city medical marijuana ordinance in place and applications pending for licensed cooperatives in the Peninsula, a number of pre-existing, unlicensed dispensaries continue to fly under the radar. Weedmap online lists about a half-dozen cooperatives currently operating in the Point Loma-Ocean Beach area, including Cloud 9 Co Op on West Point Loma Boulevard, Point Loma Patients Association on Rosecrans and Lytton streets, Starbuds Inc. on Midway Drive, Happy High Herbs on Newport Avenue, Happy Head Foot Reflexology and Massage - Sports Arena on Midway Drive and Super Max on Newport Avenue. A matter of continuing frustration for local residents and legislators alike, District 2 City Councilman Ed Harris said recently that of 63 illegal medical dispensaries operating citywide, 17 are in the beach areas he represents. Harris said shutting down unpermitted medical-marijuana dispensaries is not an easy task, however. “Closing down illegally operating medical marijuana dispensaries is time consuming and often involves months of litigation,” he said.  “There is a great deal of money to be made in this business, and often dispensary owners do whatever they can to remain open. That said, I am confident the City Attorney’s Office will get all of these shut down.” Meanwhile, Harris said, “I have asked city staff to report on their efforts to close down these dispensaries during the Public Safety and Livable Neighborhoods Council Committee meeting on [Thursday] Sept. 18 in order to make the process more open and transparent to the public.” Neighborhood Code Enforcement and the City Attorney’s Office are actively working to close illegal dispensary storefronts.  “The San Diego Police Department’s (SDPD’s) Drug Abatement Response Team (DART) and narcotic teams work with the city attorney’s Code Enforcement Unit and city code inspectors to address illegal medical marijuana dispensaries in the city of San Diego operating in violation of zoning laws,” said SDPD media services spokesman Lt. Kevin Mayer. “Once an illegal dispensary has been identified, code inspectors contact the dispensary operator and property owner, notifying them they are illegally operating.  If the dispensary refuses to close down, a civil injunction can be obtained.  If the dispensary continues to operate after the injunction is obtained, the SDPD will assist in enforcing the court order. Members of the community are encouraged to contact the police department if they believe a business is operating illegally.”  It’s been 17 years since California’s Compassionate Use Act was approved by state voters and legitimized medical-marijuana use. The city’s new dispensary ordinance, passed earlier this year, amends the land-development code and the local coastal program to add medical marijuana consumer cooperatives as a new, separately regulated land use. Problems with enforcing regulations governing medical marijuana dispensaries include overlapping state and federal jurisdictions. The process has also taken so long that many residents are unsure of what the rules are exactly and where — and to whom — they apply. “I thought the cooperatives were zoned out of OB,” said Denny Knox, executive director of the Ocean Beach MainStreet Association, the community’s business improvement district.  “Didn’t the City Council designate just a few places to have pot shops and OB wasn’t on the list?” “The last time we had pot stores in OB, we ended up with seven of them — pretty overwhelming,” said Knox.“It wasn’t the best of situations.  We only have one legitimate pharmacy, and then we needed seven pot stores?  It seemed odd at best. “People don’t like to believe that lots of pot stores lead to other drug availability in the neighborhood,” she said. “That was definitely our experience.  The stores also brought a lot of travelers into town looking to get high at the beach. There seemed to be a lot of drug activity in the alleys when all the pot stores were open.  There were lots of cars driving in the alleys getting packages from individuals standing behind buildings. Sort of like a drive-thru, but not.”  Pro-marijuana dispensary spokesman Eugene Davidovich of the  Alliance for Responsible Medicinal Access (ARMA) characterized the notion that medical marijuana patients are drug addicts as “ignorant, insulting and flies in the face of much evidence to the contrary.” Saying the claim that cannabis has medicinal benefits for relief of symptoms like tremors, seizures and nausea “is simply no longer in dispute,” Davidovich said. “What we need now is to ensure San Diego patients are able to go to well-regulated cooperatives for their medicine.  “Because there are currently no licensed cooperatives in the city, patients have no choice but to go to an unlicensed shop,” he said. “This issue underscores exactly why ARMA advocates for good, sensible regulations. Once there are licensed cooperatives in the city, there will be no more need for patients to go to the unlicensed facilities.” Davidovich said cooperatives that are compliant with the new, strict laws will be great neighbors “both because of the rules and the level of difficulty and investment needed to secure a permit. These will not be fly-by-night operations, rather they will more resemble pharmacies and will not be unwelcome in their communities. “ARMA urges the public to embrace the process and regulations that will result in well-operated, licensed dispensaries as the best hope for seeing the less-scrupulous operators close up shop, either by city code enforcement action or by virtue of the fact that permitted cooperatives have a market advantage,” said Davidovich. “Research has shown that regulations help to protect safe, responsible access for patients to their medicine and reduce crime and complaints in neighborhoods.” APPLICANTS FOR LEGAL DISPENSARIES CONTINUE TO LINE UP FOR APPROVAL IN MIDWAY DISTRICT There are presently 38 applications citywide for new proposed legally permitted medical-marijuana dispensaries under a new ordinance adopted earlier this year. That ordinance allows conditional approval for a maximum of four dispensaries in any of the nine City Council districts, said Edith Gutierrez of the city’s Development Services Department.  Of those legal dispensary applications, 18 — or nearly half — are in City Council District 2, which includes the beach areas from Point Loma and Ocean Beach north to Mission Beach and Pacific Beach. There are no applications in districts 1 , 4, 5 and 9. Council District 3 (Gloria) has two applicants, District 6 has nine, District 7 has four and District 8 has five. “Applications are processed on a first-come, first-served basis,” said Gutierrez. The new city ordinance allows medical marijuana dispensaries in industrially zoned areas. They are not allowed within 1,000 feet of churches, public parks, schools, child-care centers, city libraries, minor-oriented facilities, residential-care facilities or other medical-marijuana consumer cooperatives. An initial deposit of $8,000 is required by the city of all marijuana medical-dispensary applicants. In 1996, California voters passed Proposition 215, making it the first state in the union to allow for the medical use of marijuana. Since then, 19 more states and the District of Columbia have enacted similar laws. In two states, Colorado and Washington, the sale and possession of marijuana is legal for both medical and recreational use. However, the U.S. Supreme Court has ruled that the federal government has a right to regulate and criminalize cannabis. Also, if the cannabis is called “medical cannabis,” the federal law still has priority. At the federal level, marijuana remains classified as a Schedule I substance under the Controlled Substances Act. Schedule I substances are considered to have a high potential for dependency and no accepted medical use, making distribution of marijuana a federal offense. In October 2009, the Obama administration sent a memo to federal prosecutors encouraging them not to prosecute people who distribute marijuana for medical purposes in accordance with state law.
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    Abandoned remodel giant on Plum St. draws attention of city officials
    by DAVE SCHWAB
    Aug 28, 2014 | 529 views | 0 0 comments | 2 2 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Neighbors on Plum Street have been frustrated by the abandoned remodel of this giant home by the property owner. Neighbors said nothing has been done in four years. The city is taking strong measures to remedy the eyesore. 
Photo by Dave Schwab
    Neighbors on Plum Street have been frustrated by the abandoned remodel of this giant home by the property owner. Neighbors said nothing has been done in four years. The city is taking strong measures to remedy the eyesore. Photo by Dave Schwab
    slideshow
    After years of inaction, authorities are finally going after an abandoned remodel on Plum Street on a corner lot in Point Loma. “I filed criminally against the owner of the perpetual remodel at 1676 Plum St. (at the corner of Lowell Street),” said Danna W. Nicholas, deputy city attorney for the city. A total of seven misdemeanor counts have been filed in San Diego Superior Court against the property’s owner, Francisco Mendiola. The counts all carry a sentence of six months in jail and a $1,000 fine, if pursued to the maximum extent. Charges against Mendiola include maintaining a construction fence and storing materials on the street, as well as maintaining steel for a retaining wall and stairs on the public right-of-way in front of the property without a public right-of-way encroachment agreement, in violation of the San Diego Municipal Code. The seven counts also in-clude allowing the existence of a vacant structure that created a public nuisance. It’s also alleged that the defendant unlawfully failed to obtain a new building permit within 90 calendar days from the date of a written notice from the city. “[Mendiola] didn’t diligently pursue the work to completion,” states the court case against him. “He also did not remove and demolish the building and structure within 180 calendar days from the date of written notice from the city, as required.” District 2 City Councilman Ed Harris and his staff recently met with city Code Enforcement and the City Attorney’s Office to inquire about the abandoned remodel on Plum Street and two others located at 4544 Alhambra St. and a house off Cañon and Valemont streets. Attempts to contact Mendiola were unsuccessful. It is believed Mendiola lives in Mexico. However, the news was welcomed by Plum Street neighbor Jerry Lohla, who’s been complaining for years to the Peninsula Community Planning Board and others about the injustice of the continued presence of a huge abandoned remodel in his neighborhood’s midst. “[Mendiola] got the building permit in 2007 and he was supposed to be finished in 18 months, and here we are,” said Lohla, adding nothing’s been done at all to improve the property for four years. “He was given a notice of violation by the city to finish the house or demolish it.” Lohla said part of the problem with abandoned remodels stems from a loophole in exiting city rules. “There are very lenient development regulations for remodels,” he said. “Unlike new construction, where the design has to be vetted through the city Development Services and the community planning board, when you buy an existing house you don’t have to do any of that.” Since it’s assumed with remodels that you’re just going to be “changing a wall here or there,” Lohla said that allows developers the wiggle room to “buy existing houses to circumvent the thorough review process for new construction.” Lohla said that in theory, remodels are required to keep at least 50 percent of the home’s studs and incorporate them into the new structure. But in practice, he said that often results in “a complete redo of a home, virtually turning it into new construction.” Lohla organized a petition drive to spur action against the abandoned Plum remodel project, in which he garnered about 100 signatures from neighbors. “I went down to City Council and publicly spoke about it in March this year,” he said. Of the fate of the Plum Street dwelling, Lohla said he and his neighbors “are willing to have the house completed.” But he warned that would likely be cost-prohibitive given the 7-digit expense that he said has already gone into redeveloping the home. “I don’t think anyone could get any profit out of it or even get their money back,” Lohla said. “We’d much prefer to see the house demolished.” Lohla cautioned that terminating the Plum Street abandoned remodel could continue to be time consuming, given the owner’s history of legal delaying tactics, which have allowed him to string out development of this property and others he reportedly owns elsewhere in San Diego, including La Jolla. All the properties have reportedly been started and then abandoned. In any event, Lohla said he and his neighbors are prepared to launch a publicity campaign to do whatever it takes to get the abandoned Plum Street remodel remedied one way or another, once and for all.
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    Low-cost alternative healthcare in OB: more than a trend
    by TERRIE LEIGH RELF
    Aug 28, 2014 | 826 views | 0 0 comments | 3 3 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Clients relax in a community setting at Beach Community Acupuncture, an Ocean Beach business that promotes low-cost alternative healthcare, along with other local merchants. 
								        Courtesy photo by Brian Murray
    Clients relax in a community setting at Beach Community Acupuncture, an Ocean Beach business that promotes low-cost alternative healthcare, along with other local merchants. Courtesy photo by Brian Murray
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    Acupuncturist Mary Vincent, left, and Nicole Murray, owner of Beach Community Acupuncture, are all smiles as they continue their mission of providing low-cost alternative healthcare to Ocean Beach residents and neighbors.  			             Photo by Brian Murray
    Acupuncturist Mary Vincent, left, and Nicole Murray, owner of Beach Community Acupuncture, are all smiles as they continue their mission of providing low-cost alternative healthcare to Ocean Beach residents and neighbors. Photo by Brian Murray
    slideshow
    One of the many benefits of living in Ocean Beach is the presence of alternative healthcare — and at a reasonable price. This is also true of San Diego at large. “A trend in medicine in general,” according to Donald Phillips, a faculty member of Pacific School of Oriental Medicine, “is toward integrative healthcare that pairs Western medicine with alternative health-care practitioners.” While some practitioners offer private room sessions with their low-cost services, others provide a community-style space where clients receive treatment together. Obecian Mercy Baron has experienced this community-style setting. “When you are all in one room, it makes it easier for the facilitator to check on how everyone is doing, rather than going from room to room,” said Baron. “Everyone is very quiet because they want you to relax, and some even fall asleep. Even when the acupuncturist is doing their thing, they talk quietly, almost in a whisper.” Whether you prefer a private or community setting, there are several options to explore. • ACUSPORT HEALTH CENTER Aquilino Soriano said his clinic does have set prices and that he will personally work with people on a sliding scale or payment plan. He said he also believes in the barter system and is open to discussing what people have to offer in exchange for treatment. “I want to help as many people as I can,” he said. “There’s a definite need and I want to fill that void when I can, whether it’s seniors, unemployed, single moms and so forth.” • 1804 Cable St., (619) 243-5109; acusporthealth.com. • BEACH COMMUNITY ACUPUNCTURE “Since we opened in 2009, we’ve been offering $20 acupuncture treatments for everyone, every day, for five years — a total of 45,000 treatments,” said owner Nicole Murray. “We are also a member clinic of the multi-stakeholder cooperative organization called the People’s Organization of Community Acupuncture. The most recent survey of member clinics showed that we collectively provided more than 900,000 treatments in 2013. We are excited to be a part of the growing movement for low-cost alternative healthcare.” She said her clinic provides a community setting with “eight reclining chairs and a lovely, bright, friendly space. Acupuncture is most effective when prescribed more frequently. It’s common to have people come multiple times a week, or even daily, to see a significant change in the condition. The more affordable fee makes this possible for more people.” • 4993 Niagara Ave., Suite 206, (619) 224-2442, beachacu.com. • THE BALANCED BEAR Laura Pallesen, who owns The Balanced Bear chiropractic office in Ocean Beach, wants her services to be accessible. “I offer great prices and memberships, usually better than what people pay with insurance,” she said. On Mondays and Thursdays, Pallesen volunteers for the nonprofit Alternative Healing Network, where she provides treatments on a sliding scale. • 4966 Santa Monica Ave., Suite H, (619) 567-7005, thebalancedbear.com. • ALTERNATIVE HEALING NETWORK AND THE ADAMS AVENUE INTEGRATIVE HEALTH CENTER The Alternative Healing Network, which was founded by Ryan Altman, offers a variety of integrative services that combine Western and Eastern treatment modalities. In addition to the Adams Avenue Integrative Health Center, it has a center in La Mesa. The network has free community outreach clinics and offers sliding-scale treatments for the entire family in a community-style environment. • 3239 Adams Ave., (619) 546-5326, althealnet.org. • PACIFIC COLLEGE OF ORIENTAL MEDICINE “Our faculty have 10- to 20-plus years of experience, and students come from a variety of backgrounds, often with skills beyond that which is taught at PCOM,” said Phillips. “Students and faculty have resources available to them that may be cost prohibitive in private practice. The cost of treatment at PCOM is moderate compared to privately licensed acupuncturists, which usually charge $60 and above.” Philips said clients have two choices “between a student intern with an assistant or two and a supervisor with whom they consult or a licensed practitioner with a team of students assisting them. Because this is a learning environment, students will be present at all treatments.” PCOM uses a community-room environment with curtains to create semi-private space, according to Philips. • 7445 Mission Valley Road, Suite 105, (619) 574-6932; www.pacificcollege.edu.
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    News
    Council torpedoes Faulconer’s veto on minimum-wage hike
    At a special meeting called during its August recess, San Diego City Council voted 6-2 on Aug. 18 to override Mayor Kevin Faulconer’s veto of the city’s hourly minimum-wage ordinance, which provide...
    Aug 28, 2014 | 0 0 comments | 2 2 recommendations | email to a friend
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    Sports
    Pointers set to avenge stinging playoff loss with 2014 season opener
    The 2014 edition of the PLHS football team begins its season right where the 2013 squad saw its season come to a bitter end. Head coach Mike Hastings takes his newest Pointers back to Oceanside’s E...
    Aug 28, 2014 | 0 0 comments | 4 4 recommendations | email to a friend
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    Opinion
    GUEST VIEW: Building density issues continue to be at forefront of concerns
    I appreciated the feedback of community members regarding density in the Aug. 14 Peninsula Beacon.  It is critical for District 2 residents to be engaged in the community planning process so they c...
    Aug 28, 2014 | 0 0 comments | 2 2 recommendations | email to a friend
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    Arts & Entertainment
    Starlit Productions emerges as powerful arts backer in SD music scene
    Ocean Beach is home to a plethora of musicians, artists and poets, but even in a crowded field, Joseph Stevens and Starlit Productions is a standout. Alongside his wife, Jennifer, Stevens has spent...
    Aug 28, 2014 | 1 1 comments | 5 5 recommendations | email to a friend
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    Business
    Big changes on tap at Oggi’s Liberty Station
    Reigning as Liberty Station’s first full-service restaurant, Oggi’s Sports|Brew-house|Pizza is expanding its menu and beer program to the tune of a new audio-visual system that will arrive just in ...
    Aug 28, 2014 | 0 0 comments | 2 2 recommendations | email to a friend
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    Obituaries
    James Freeman Gilbert, Scripps geophysics researcher, 83
    James Freeman Gilbert, Scripps geophysics researcher, 83 James Freeman Gilbert, a renowned professor emeritus of geophysics in the Cecil H. and Ida M. Green Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Ph...
    Aug 21, 2014 | 0 0 comments | 8 8 recommendations | email to a friend
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