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    Mastodon discovery in San Diego shows evidence that humans lived here 130,000 years ago
    Apr 27, 2017 | 16405 views | 1 1 comments | 10 10 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Brett Agenbroad (top left), Larry Agenbroad (left), James Mead (bottom left), and Dr. Tom Deméré excavating fossils found at the Cerutti Mastodon site. / Photo courtesy of San Diego Natural History Museum
    Brett Agenbroad (top left), Larry Agenbroad (left), James Mead (bottom left), and Dr. Tom Deméré excavating fossils found at the Cerutti Mastodon site. / Photo courtesy of San Diego Natural History Museum
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    Retired San Diego Natural History Museum paleontologist Richard Cerutti (left) and curator of paleontology and director of PaleoServices Dr. Tom Deméré (right) looking at mastodon bones salvaged at the Cerutti Mastodon site. / Photo by Kate Johnson, San Diego Natural History Museum
    Retired San Diego Natural History Museum paleontologist Richard Cerutti (left) and curator of paleontology and director of PaleoServices Dr. Tom Deméré (right) looking at mastodon bones salvaged at the Cerutti Mastodon site. / Photo by Kate Johnson, San Diego Natural History Museum
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    An Ice Age paleontological-turned-archaeological site in San Diego preserves 130,000-year-old bones and teeth of a mastodon that show evidence of modification by early humans. Analysis of these finds dramatically revises the timeline for when humans first reached North America, according to a paper to be published in the April 27 issue of the prestigious science journal Nature. The fossil remains were discovered by San Diego Natural History Museum paleontologists during routine paleontological mitigation work at a freeway expansion project site managed by the California Department of Transportation (Caltrans). The bones, tusks, and molars, many of which are sharply broken, were found deeply buried alongside large stones that appeared to have been used as hammers and anvils, making this the oldest in situ, well-documented archaeological site in the Americas. “This discovery is rewriting our understanding of when humans reached the New World. The evidence we found at this site indicates that some hominin species was living in North America 115,000 years earlier than previously thought,” said Judy Gradwohl, president and CEO of the San Diego Natural History Museum, whose paleontology team discovered the fossils, managed the excavation, and incorporated the specimens into the museum’s research collection. “This raises intriguing questions about how these early humans arrived here and who they were.” Until recently, the oldest records of human sites in North America generally accepted by archaeologists were about 14,000 years old. But the fossils from the Cerutti Mastodon site (as the site was named in recognition of field paleontologist Richard Cerutti who discovered the site and led the excavation), were found embedded in fine-grained sediments that had been deposited much earlier, during a period long before humans were thought to have arrived on the continent. “When we first discovered the site, there was strong physical evidence that placed humans alongside extinct Ice Age megafauna. This was significant in and of itself and a ‘first’ in San Diego County,” said Dr. Tom Deméré, curator of paleontology and director of PaleoServices at the San Diego Natural History Museum and corresponding author on the paper. “Since the original discovery, dating technology has advanced to enable us to confirm with further certainty that early humans were here significantly earlier than commonly accepted.” Since its initial discovery in late 1992, this site has been the subject of research by top scientists to date the fossils accurately and evaluate microscopic damage on bones and rocks that authors now consider indicative of human activity. In 2014, Dr. James Paces, a research geologist with the U.S. Geological Survey, used state-of-the-art radiometric dating methods to determine that the mastodon bones – which were still fresh when they were broken by strategically-placed blows from hammerstones – were 130,000 years old, with a conservative error of plus or minus 9,400 years. “The distributions of natural uranium and its decay products both within and among these bone specimens show remarkably reliable behavior, allowing us to derive an age that is well within the wheelhouse of the dating system,” explained Paces, a co-author of the paper. The finding poses a lot more questions than answers: Who were these people? Are they part of an early – but failed – colonization attempt? Or is there a long, but as of yet, scarcely recognized presence of humans in this hemisphere? “There’s no doubt in my mind this is an archaeological site,” said Dr. Steve Holen, director of research at the Center for American Paleolithic Research, former curator of archaeology at the Denver Museum of Nature & Science, and the lead author of the paper. “The bones and several teeth show clear signs of having been deliberately broken by humans with manual dexterity and experiential knowledge. This breakage pattern has also been observed at mammoth fossil sites in Kansas and Nebraska, where alternative explanations such as geological forces or gnawing by carnivores have been ruled out,” Holen said. The specimens recovered from the Cerutti mastodon site will be on display on Level 2 of the museum beginning April 26, and a public lecture featuring several of the Nature article authors will take place on 7 p.m. Saturday, April 29. Digital 3D models of a selection of specimens pointing toward human association at this site can be viewed interactively at the University of Michigan Online Repository of Fossils. Animations featuring these models are also presented as supplementary information associated with the published version of this research. Eleven authors contributed to the manuscript that is scheduled to be published in Nature: Dr. Steve Holen, director of research at the Center for American Paleolithic Research; Dr. Tom Deméré, curator of paleontology and director of PaleoServices at the San Diego Natural History Museum; Dr. Daniel Fisher, professor of paleontology and director and curator of the Museum of Paleontology at the University of Michigan; Dr. Richard Fullagar, professorial research fellow at the Centre for Archaeological Science at the University of Wollongong, Australia; Dr. James Paces, research geologist at the U.S. Geological Survey; Kathleen Maule Holen, administrative director at the Center for American Paleolithic Research; Dr. Jared Beeton, professor of physical geography at Adams State University; Dr. Adam Rountrey, collection manager in the Museum of Paleontology at the University of Michigan; George T. Jefferson, district staff paleontologist at Anza-Borrego Desert State Park; Dr. Lawrence Vescera, volunteer paleontologist at the California State Parks Colorado Desert District Stout Research Center in Borrego Springs; and Richard Cerutti, former paleontological monitor at the San Diego Natural History Museum. Recovery of the fossils was supported by Caltrans District 11. Major funding for research and display of the artifacts was provided by the National Geographic Society, the Walton Family Fund, Pat Boyce and Debbie Fritsch, the James Hervey Johnson Charitable Educational Trust, and the Downing Family Foundation. The San Diego Natural History Museum (theNAT) is the second oldest scientific institution in California and the third oldest west of the Mississippi. Founded in 1874 by a small group of citizen scientists, the Museum’s mission is to interpret the natural world through research, education, and exhibits; to promote understanding of the evolution and diversity of southern California and the peninsula of Baja California, Mexico; and to inspire in all people respect for the environment. The Museum is located at 1788 El Prado, San Diego, in Balboa Park. For more information, call 877-946-7797 or visit sdnat.org.
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    fredtully
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    April 28, 2017
    that would suggest that "man" were Neanderthals, or the teeth were exposed and harvested in the last 20000 years. San Diego is not far from 19800 year old Channel island remains.
    Liberty Public Market to add farmers market this spring
    by DAVE SCHWAB
    Apr 27, 2017 | 2119 views | 0 0 comments | 0 0 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    The farmers market will be on Liberty Public Market's exterior patio. / Photo by Robert Benson
    The farmers market will be on Liberty Public Market's exterior patio. / Photo by Robert Benson
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    Liberty Public Market in Point Loma will soon have a farmers market to complement it. Joining the public market at Liberty Station sometime in early May will be a full-blown farmers market offering locally generated produce. “We've teamed up with six local farmers to start the new market,” said Liberty Public Market general manager Josh Zanow, who pointed out running a successful produce market is “a tough game.” Noting a produce stand at the public market didn't succeed initially, Zanow commented, “If the shelves are half full – you don't sell. If they're totally filled up – you don't sell out.” Ron LaChance, who runs a few farmers markets around town, said Thursday, May 4 is being eyed as the target date for the opening of the new Liberty Public Market Farmers Market. “It will be open every Thursday from 2 to 7 p.m. year-round, rain or shine,” added LaChance, noting the farmers market will begin on the public market's outside patio. “The bulk of the farmers market will be on the lawn adjacent to the Liberty Station Public Market by the public green off the golf course,” he said. “It will flow almost up to the gate of the Liberty Public Market.” LaChance said the new farmers market will include live music and plenty of artisans and crafters. Of course, the centerpiece, will be produce by local growers. “We'll have approximately 25 different farms represented,” he said, noting their product mix will include cheese, honey, flowers, and meat and fish as well as produce. “There will be 35 speciality foods – olive oils, salsas, desserts, baked goods, etc.,” LaChance said, pointing out, “There won't be any cooked foods, the idea being that there are plenty of restaurants to have dinner or drinks here at Liberty Station.” Above all, LaChance promises the produce will be fresh at Liberty Public Market's Farmers Market. “The beauty is that the produce will be picked that morning, right from the vine, by the farmers who come to sell it that day at 2 p.m.,” he said. “It wasn't picked four weeks ago and then shipped.” Zanow said Thursday was picked as an optimal in-between day to draw more people, as opposed to weekends, which are busy enough already. “Saturdays and Sundays (at the public market) are already crazy, and the idea was to pick a less crowded day we might capitalize on to draw people into the farmers and public markets,” he said. “Plus, there's so many big farmers markets on weekends, many farmers could not commit to coming to ours if we had it on weekends.” Zanow added the farmers market will be open except for national holidays, like Thanksgiving. Closed in March 1997, Liberty Station is the 361-acre, mixed-use redevelopment of the former Naval Training Center. The project includes a retail and commercial district, a promenade focused on nonprofit activities, an educational district, a residential district, a hotel district, an office district, and a park/open space area along the boat channel. Open for more than a year, Liberty Public Market food emporium spans 25,000-square-feet in Liberty Station. This massive project from Blue Bridge Hospitality open every day houses 27 artisan vendors. The market's footprint also includes ample outdoor space, including multiple dining decks and a 3,000-square-foot dog-friendly patio.
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    News and community briefs for Ocean Beach and Point Loma
    Apr 26, 2017 | 2422 views | 0 0 comments | 0 0 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Flowers are still popping at Sunset Cliffs Natural Park. / PHOTO BY THOMAS MELVILLE
    Flowers are still popping at Sunset Cliffs Natural Park. / PHOTO BY THOMAS MELVILLE
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    Early plans for changes at Saratoga Park Obecians weighed-in on what they'd like to see in planning for the park at the foot of Saratoga Avenue adjacent to the Ocean Beach lifeguard station. Led by former San Diego City Councilmember Byron Wear, the April 18 workshop at OB Rec Center was attended by about 20 local residents. Wear stressed that the park project is still in the concept phase. “We anticipate 100 percent of this to be funded with private money from this point forward,” he said adding, “This is a long, transparent process.” After opening remarks from Wear and a landscape architect, the audience broke into small groups to discuss what they liked, and didn't like, about the park concept. A couple of residents questioned both the need, and placement, of the project's proposed beachfront site. One suggested Dusty Rhodes Park might be a better alternative. Other residents offered ideas for how they'd like to see Saratoga green space re-utilized. Most agreed residents of all ages, including children with a tot lot and exercising adults, including lifeguards, needed to be accommodated in any concept moving forward. “We'll be coming back at some point with refinements,” Wear told attendees. The Antique Center for sale on Newport Avenue In 1994, Mr. Allgaier and Mr. Gerwig got the idea to purchase the 18,000-square-foot building formerly occupied by the Cornet store at 4850-64 Newport Ave. for $500,000, and decided to open what is now called The Antique Center. Allgaier and Gerwig managed to borrow money from some friends to pay for the commercial real estate and for more than two decades, they have successfully run the business paying off their loans while becoming a staple within Ocean Beach. Today, Allgaier and Gerwig have decided to finally pass their legacy on to someone else. Their preference is to sell their business to someone who will continue operating The Antique Center, while taking a more passive level of ownership. However, if the market does not bring someone interested to purchase the business, then they would lease out the building, or they would sell the real estate entirely. They have listed the business and the real estate for sale with local commercial real estate advisors, The Franco Realty Group. “This is an excellent opportunity for someone to own an 18,000-square-foot building on a 30,000-square-foot piece of land with 150 feet of frontage along Newport Avenue,” said Tony Franco, president of The Franco Realty Group. “The Antique Center is one of the most popular and notable buildings within the Ocean Beach community,” he said. Search for missing woman in Ocean Beach A search is continuing for a missing Linda Vista woman who disappeared March 28 after a night out with friends. The wallet and ID of Debra Puente, 50, were discovered in her abandoned car found recently in Ocean Beach, according to Puente's daughter, Ashleigh Tarango. Tarango flew to San Diego from Colorado to help search for her mother. She has been talking to people and posting photos in hopes someone will recognize her and come forward with information on her whereabouts. Puente is white, 5-feet 4-inches tall, 115 pounds with brown hair, blue eyes and a large mole on her left cheek bone, under her eye. A group called "Cal Advocates For The Missing" is helping in the search. Anyone with information regarding her whereabouts is urged to call Luna at 619-531-2277 or the SDPD's main number at 619-531-2000. Man stabbed in OB A victim and his female friend were renovating an upstairs apartment about 6:30 p.m. on April 24, at the intersection of Ebers and Voltaire streets. An unknown suspect parked in the parking lot and started honking his horn and whistling at the victim's female friend. From the balcony, the victim and suspect got into a verbal argument. The victim told the suspect to leave the property when he challenged him to come down and fight. About an hour later the suspect returned, took a ladder from his truck and climbed up to the balcony. The victim was on his knees scraping paint off a window when the suspect charged the victim with a knife. The victim fearing for his life hit the suspect with the paint scrapper and fell back into the window, breaking the glass cutting the victim. The two fought on the floor and the suspect stabbed the victim in the leg and calf. The victim punched the suspect in the face causing him to become partially unconscious. The victim and female ran to the fire station across the street for help. Officers arrived, and with K-9 took the suspect into custody in the apartment. Their injuries were not life threatening. OB Farmers Market’s 25th anniversary San Diego is fortunate to have numerous weekly open air markets within its borders, but nothing compares with the Ocean Beach Farmers Market, held each Wednesday along Newport Avenue at Bacon Street. Located just steps from the beach, delicious smells from the various food vendors, colorful crafts and joyful music blend to create a unique experience that’s a kaleidoscope for the senses. The market was started in 1992 by the Ocean Beach Main Street Association. “It was to help bring people into the area, help local merchants and bring the community together at the same time,” said the association’s executive director Denny Knox. “It took a little while for it to establish itself, but it’s now a self-sustaining event. We have up to 2,500 visitors each week, with substantially more if it’s a warm, sunny day.” On May 17, the OB Farmer’s Market will celebrate its 25th anniversary with the giveaway of a free recyclable vegetables bag, as well as a proclamation from Councilmember Lori Zapf. OB Kiwanis Kite Festival The 69th annual Ocean Beach Kiwanis Kite Festival, Off-Street Fair, and Carnival will take place 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, May 13, at Dusty Rhodes Park, Sunset Cliffs Boulevard. There will be free parking and shuttle from Robb Field. There will be kite building and decorating, prizes, professional kite fliers, kite demonstrations, and games, crafters, community organizations, gourmet food, carnival activities and live music from Beer Feat. Youngsters are taught how to make and fly kites. All materials are supplied. There are prizes for the best decorated kites. Any handmade kite can be submitted, not just kites made at the festival. This free family event is the oldest children’s kite festival in the U.S. National Infant Immunization Week Fourteen. This is the number of vaccines children should get over their first 18 months to avoid getting sick. April 22-29 is National Infant Immunization Week, and the San Diego County Health and Human Services Agency is reminding parents to make sure their children are up to date with immunizations. Parents should ask their doctor or clinic to check their child’s immunization record and make sure their baby is up to date. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends infants get shots at birth, 2, 4, 6, 12, 15, and 18 months of age to protect them against many diseases including measles, meningitis and whooping cough. Surveys indicate that vaccination coverage among San Diego County kindergarteners is near an all-time high. During the current school year, 1,059 of more than 46,000 local kindergartners were missing some or all recommended vaccines. However, about 45,000 babies are born every year and they should be immunized on time to stay healthy. Fiesta Old Town Cinco de Mayo Grab your amigos and head over to historic Old Town to spice up your weekend with the 34th annual Fiesta Old Town Cinco de Mayo taking place Friday, May 5 through Sunday, May 7. This weekend celebration attracts more than 100,000 people over the course of three days with its bustling mercado, non-stop music and live entertainment, lucha libre wrestling, and a huge display of lowriders and other incredible autos. Feed your appetite by feasting at the dining establishments throughout Old Town, or at one of the many food vendors offering up cervezas, agua fescas, burritos, tacos, and more. Enjoy margarita and tequila specials throughout Old Town to get you in the mood to shake your maracas and fiesta the day and night away. Proceeds benefit the Historic Old Town Community Foundation. For information, visit www.CincoDeMayoOldTown.com. OB photo contest The Ocean Beach Town Council has started a "Share Your OB" photo contest. To enter just tag your best photos of OB with #shareyourOB and post on Instagram or Facebook. Winner receives bragging rights and is entered in a monthly drawing for some cool swag. Each Saturday, a new winner will be announced. So get out there and #shareyourOB. Miracle Babies 5K The ninth annual Miracle Babies 5K will take place from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Sunday, May 7 at NTC Park at Liberty Station (2455 Cushing Road), with registration beginning at 7 a.m. The event includes a timed 5K run at 8 a.m. followed by a family friendly 5K walk at 9 a.m. Attendees are invited to show their spirit by dressing up as their favorite hero. Participants will receive a collectable race medal and are encourage and invited to attend in the postrace celebration including a Kid Zone, Family Resource Fair, merchandise vendors, food trucks and exotic cars. Registration fee for walkers is $25 for adults and free for children under 12. Runners’ fee is $30 for adults and $10 for children under 12. Register at www.miraclebabies5k.com. Talmadge Art Show The Talmadge Art Show artists have created works of contemporary craft and clothing just for this show 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday, May 7 at Liberty Station Conference Center, 2600 Laning Road. Come early to shop at the show and meet the artists. For more information, visit talmadgeartshow.com.
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    Cliffs crumbling in Ocean Beach
    by DAVE SCHWAB
    Apr 26, 2017 | 939 views | 0 0 comments | 12 12 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Two beachgoers recently walk past the crumbling cliffs just south of the Ocean Beach Pier, which are covered by a blue tarp. / PHOTO BY THOMAS MELVILLE
    Two beachgoers recently walk past the crumbling cliffs just south of the Ocean Beach Pier, which are covered by a blue tarp. / PHOTO BY THOMAS MELVILLE
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    Signs warn beachgoers to stay back. / PHOTO BY THOMAS MELVILLE
    Signs warn beachgoers to stay back. / PHOTO BY THOMAS MELVILLE
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    The coastal cliffs in Ocean Beach are seriously eroding. Nowhere is that more apparent than the tarp-covered area just south of Ocean Beach Pier, where crumbling cement, rock and dirt have fallen creating a debris field on the sandstone below. Patrick Abbot, a geology professor at San Diego State University who's authored a textbook on local geology, including coastal erosion, explained what is happening to Ocean Beach's cliffs. “The geological ‘problem’ is young, soft, weak sandstone above and old, hard, strong sandstone down low,” Abbot said. “The young weak sandstone has water draining down through it (both from humans and nature) that moves/erodes sand grains weakening the cliff area.” Abbot said tarps covering the eroding bluffs “are more for psychological effect than cliff strengthening.” The geologist gave his bottom-line evaluation of the problematic landform. “It is a weak area that erodes easily,” he said. “If erosion is to be slowed significantly, massive structures would need to be built at great expense and loss of beauty and recreational opportunities, all requiring permission from the Coastal Commission.” Abbot added he's been around long enough “to see buildings collapse over this cliff area, then after a few-years wait, new buildings are constructed above the retreated cliff face.” Regarding the eroded cliffs south of OB Pier, Tim Graham, city public information officer, said: “The initial assessment is that the two walls may have failed due to saturation of the soil as a result of the rains as opposed to erosion. The walls, possibly built in the '50s or '60s, were likely built originally in an effort to fortify the properties above. We (city) are still trying to track down when the walls were actually put in place, and who constructed them.” Graham added existing property owners on the bluff top have “secured the services of a geotechnical engineer who has taken a look at the walls, and intends to make the repairs to the walls himself and secure the necessary permits to do so. We're trying to find out where they are in that process.”
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    Del Mar Racetrack undergoing modifications prior to opening day, Breeders’ Cup
    Apr 23, 2017 | 18909 views | 0 0 comments | 20 20 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    The Del Mar Racetrack’s upgrades will be completed before opening day.
    The Del Mar Racetrack’s upgrades will be completed before opening day.
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    Under the direction of its new director of track maintenance, Dennis Moore, Del Mar has begun a process designed to modify its main track with an end result of having it replicate the banking and grading of its sister track to the north, Santa Anita Park. Crews began their work on the track on Wednesday, March 29, and the stripping and grading activity is expected to take several weeks. The plan is to adjust the seaside oval’s main track banking to 5 percent (from 4 percent) on the turns and 2.5 percent (from 2 percent) in the straightaways,as is the case currently with Santa Anita – well in advance of the opening of Del Mar’s 78th summer season on Wednesday, July 19. “Our priority, of course, is safety,” said Joe Harper, Del Mar Thoroughbred Club’s president, and CEO. “One of the key elements in safety is consistency and this adjustment will give our horses and horsemen that consistency when it comes to the two main racing surfaces on our circuit. Once again we salute the folks at Santa Anita for working with us on this.” Moore, who is considered one of the top track surface experts in the world and is presently the track superintendent at Santa Anita, took on his additional role at Del Mar earlier this year. “We’ve got the same El Segundo sand from the same batch at both Santa Anita and Del Mar,” Moore noted. “That’s a good step on the road to consistency. Then we’re adding another by bringing the banking at Del Mar right in line with what already exists at Santa Anita, therefore giving our horses the same experience on both tracks, which has to prop up their confidence and make an easier transition between the two. This change isn’t a drastic one, but it’s the little things that can make for big differences.” Del Mar has put in place a series of adjustments for its 2017 meetings that are aimed at increasing safety for horses and riders at the popular shore track. Among the changes for the summer session is a return to a seven-week season (instead of eight) with a later start, thus allowing horses and horsemen more time to get acclimated to new surroundings. The revised calendar also allows for incremental days to prepare the track in advance of racing and training. Additionally, there will be fewer horses (by approximately 10 percent) allowed to stable on the grounds, therefore reducing the traffic issues during morning workout times. Further, adjustments to the track flow during the morning work period were experimented with last year and found to be very effective. That rule will be employed throughout 2017. Del Mar continues to work with the California Horse Racing Board and, in particular, its executive director, Rick Baedeker, as it ensures that all avenues are explored in its search for more and more safety. Additionally, it employs and calls upon one of the industry’s premier track experts, Dr. Mick Peterson, for advice and counsel in its various projects. “I am pleased to see that there is a coordinated effort with Del Mar and other industry stakeholders to create consistent track surfaces in Southern California on a year-round basis,” said Peterson. “I look forward to continuing to collect and analyze all pertinent data with the goal of creating the safest possible environment for horses and riders.”  “When the horses shift between races after Los Angeles, some then race at Los Alamitos in Orange County, but some shift directly to Del Mar,” said Mac Macbride, director of media for the Del Mar Thoroughbred Club. “Consistency is a big deal for these animals.” Following the track’s 36-day summer meet, it will hold its fourth fall meeting, a 16-day run between Nov. 1 and Nov. 26. Highlighting that gathering will be the presentation of the 34th edition of the Breeders’ Cup on Friday, Nov. 3 and Saturday, Nov. 4 – the first time the sport’s championship events have come to the iconic racing grounds alongside the blue Pacific.  “Although this process is ongoing, we are making major headway,” said Macbride. “Initially, we were talking about a six-week process. Currently, we are estimated to finish in early May.” More updates The Breeders' Cup also announced its Challenge series schedule on April 12. This series will consist of 81 automatic qualifying stakes races into corresponding races of the Breeders' Cup World Championships. This year’s series, which includes 62 Grade/Group 1 events, will have 49 Challenge races held in the U.S. and Canada, and 32 races to be run outside of North America. Horses from around the globe will be qualifying for the 34th Breeders’ Cup World Championships, which will be held, for the first time, at the Del Mar race track, on Nov. 3 and 4, and televised live by NBC Sports. For more information, visit www.dmtc.com.
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    News
    Mission Bay Drive on-ramp to southbound I-5 closed four nights beginning April 30
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    Published - Friday, April 28
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    Published - Friday, April 28
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    San Diego student awarded Princeton Prize in Race Relations
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    Published - Friday, April 28
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    Published - Friday, April 28
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    Published - Friday, April 28
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    Published - Friday, April 28
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    Scripps clinic cardiologist implants 100th MitraClip
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    Published - Thursday, April 27
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    Point Loma students reach new heights with Rise of Hephaestus
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    Published - Thursday, April 27
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    Students, survivors walk for Gormly at Relay For Life
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    Published - Wednesday, April 26
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    Published - Wednesday, April 26
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    Birds Surf Shed opens Ocean Beach surf shop
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    Published - Wednesday, April 26
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    Common pesticide damages honey bee’s ability to fly
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    Published - Wednesday, April 26
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    On Friday, April 14 at 6:45 p.m., San Diego Police Officers responded to the San Diego Motel at 4780 Mission Bay Drive to investigate a report of a fight involving a man with a knife. The first off...
    Published - Wednesday, April 26
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    Man attacked and stabbed in Ocean Beach
    The victim and his female friend were renovating an upstairs apartment about 6:30 p.m. on April 24 at the intersection of Ebers and Voltaire streets. An unknown suspect parked in the parking lot an...
    Published - Tuesday, April 25
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