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    Junior Lifeguards prove they don’t fear the pier
    by Mathilde Rousseau Bjerregaard
    Aug 15, 2017 | 23187 views | 1 1 comments | 16 16 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    As part of the activities of this summer’s Junior Lifeguard Program, participants and members of the public jumped from the Ocean Beach pier on Monday, Aug. 14. / Photos by Thomas Melville
    As part of the activities of this summer’s Junior Lifeguard Program, participants and members of the public jumped from the Ocean Beach pier on Monday, Aug. 14. / Photos by Thomas Melville
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    Children and teenagers from the Junior Lifeguard Program jumped off the Ocean Beach Pier on Monday, Aug. 21 as the culmination of their month-long session. They jumped together with friends and family to conquer their fear and to raise money for the Drowning Prevention Foundation of San Diego (formerly the San Diego Junior Lifeguard Foundation), which helps fund the Junior Lifeguard Program and promotes drowning prevention and aquatic safety education. “It is a big, fun event where the kids can come out and conquer their fear of jumping off the pier,” said lifeguard Dana Nielsen. The pier jump is one of the major goals for the Junior Lifeguards’ participants, and the two pier jump days (the first session takes place in mid-July) are the only days where it is legal for people to leap off the pier. “It is a family and community event,” said Nielsen. San Diego Junior Lifeguard Program offers two four-week sessions every summer for 7 to 17 year olds. The Junior Lifeguards are taught first aid, CPR, ocean and wave education, beach safety and water rescue techniques. In addition, they learn swimming skills, body surfing, body boarding, surfing, snorkeling, stand-up paddle boarding and kayaking. Before the kids and teens participate in the program they have to pass a swimming test. “The goal is to water proof San Diego. We want to make sure that every kid gets the opportunity to learn how to swim since we are an ocean and beach community,” said Nielsen. Besides helping to fund the Junior Lifeguard Program, the Drowning Prevention Foundation of San Diego helps funding swim lessons for intercity schools and intercity groups.
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    Jamazon.
    |
    August 15, 2017
    "Conquer" not "concur."

    Does not mean the same thing.
    Marvel super hero experience coming to Valley View Casino Center
    Aug 15, 2017 | 30632 views | 0 0 comments | 19 19 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    The iconic Marvel super heroes Spider-Man and The Avengers are joined by the Guardians of the Galaxy, including Star-Lord, Gamora, Groot, Rocket and Drax, in a legendary battle to defend the universe from evil.
    The iconic Marvel super heroes Spider-Man and The Avengers are joined by the Guardians of the Galaxy, including Star-Lord, Gamora, Groot, Rocket and Drax, in a legendary battle to defend the universe from evil.
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    Super hero action, thrills and drama will soar, smash and burst into Valley View Casino Center from Aug. 24-27, with the debut of the all-new action-packed adventure Marvel Universe Live! Age of Heroes. The iconic Marvel super heroes Spider-Man and The Avengers are joined by the Guardians of the Galaxy, including Star-Lord, Gamora, Groot, Rocket and Drax, in a legendary battle to defend the universe from evil. The newest production from Feld Entertainment, the world’s leading producer of live touring family entertainment, had it’s world premiere in Los Angeles in July.   “Our tremendously talented creative team and a nearly super human cast, have created a show that brings the grandeur of Marvel to life,” said Juliette Feld, producer of Marvel Universe Live! “Age of Heroes creates an experience that immerses families in non-stop action, creating movie-style thrills and jaw-dropping stunts that showcase the powers of your favorite super heroes right before your eyes.”  Called on by Doctor Strange, the Guardians of the Galaxy join Marvel Universe Live! Age of Heroes on a momentous crusade against the scheming Nebula who teams up with the conniving and loathsome villains Loki and Green Goblin. The incredible superhuman forces of Iron Man, Thor, Black Panther, Hulk and Black Widow will unite in clashes that pit student against mentor, sister against sister and brother against brother. Immersive video projection and cutting-edge special effects will captivate and transport audiences across the universe from the fantastical Savage Land to New York City and beyond. Spider-Man and Wasp’s dynamic aerial stunts along with Captain America’s daring motorcycle skills will be on display in the ultimate race against time to save mankind. “I’m extremely excited to work on Marvel Universe Live! Age of Heroes and bring the talents and powers of these amazing characters with such dimensionality to life,” said Marvel’s chief creative officer, Joe Quesada.  “Audiences will be on the edge of their seat as they witness the outrageous stunts and fight sequences in truly a unique experience that puts fans at the center of the action.” Shows at Valley View Casino Center, 3500 Sports Arena Blvd., will take place 7 p.m. Aug. 24-25, 11 a.m., 3 p.m., 7 p.m. Aug. 26, and 1 p.m., 5 p.m. on Aug. 27. All seats are reserved; tickets are available at AXS.com, at 888-9AXS-TIX or visit the Valley View Casino Center Box Office. For a complete list of North American tour dates, locations and to purchase tickets, visit MarvelUniverseLIVE.com. 
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    Pacific Beach woman begins One Love Movement, organizes Charity Yoga Event
    by RONAN ELLIOTT
    Aug 14, 2017 | 6759 views | 0 0 comments | 23 23 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    The Embarcadero Waterfront Park during last year's Charity Yoga Event.
    The Embarcadero Waterfront Park during last year's Charity Yoga Event.
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    Waterfront Park, a patch of green sandwiched between city and harbor, is lined with palm trees and fountains. On Saturday, Aug. 19, it will also be packed with yoga students. By last year’s estimate, more than 600 people will crowd the park for the sixth annual Charity Yoga Event, spreading out mats and stretching their limbs under the directions of distinguished yoga instructors. Live music is provided by local group Dub Sutra, and afterwards the event will host an extensive wine and beer garden, with vendors such as Kashi, Indo-Love, Suja Juice and Mush. The Charity Yoga Event is organized and run by Kim Bauman, Pacific Beach resident and founder of the One Love Movement. Bauman was adopted at a young age from a South Korean orphanage. As a young adult in America, she sometimes felt directionless. Though she did frequent charity work, it took her a long time to find what she was truly passionate about. Bauman’s life was changed when she won a charity contest in 2011. The contest challenged its participants to raise as much as they could for disaster relief in Haiti. Bauman, having collected $21,000 over a period of six months, was offered a trip to the country, where she would have a chance to work on the ground with the refugees, seeing the money she’d raised put to use. It was while working at a Haitian orphanage that she had a revelation. “I realized how blessed I was for being adopted,” Bauman said. “These kids would never get the life I had.” Bauman had found a new direction. That year she launched the first annual Charity Yoga Event, with the goal of raising awareness for underserved children across the globe. Initially, the charity focused its efforts on groups native to San Diego – organizations like the Monarch School, San Diego Youth Services, and Outdoor Outreach, which work to provide education and foster care for at-risk youth. Though the foundation continues to donate to these organizations, it has since broadened its horizons. To date, the One Love Foundation has raised more than $150,000, $50,000 of which has gone to countries outside the U.S., such as Tanzania, Haiti, Uganda and the U.K. In 2015, the foundation purchased a children’s shelter in India. Today, the shelter houses 19 children, and Bauman flies out twice a year to visit. Though the Charity Yoga Event is the group’s largest fundraiser, they hold smaller events throughout the year. In 2016, they held a benefit concert at city hall, and offered outdoor yoga classes at Tower 23. Bauman also keeps a list of future projects; ways in which the foundation hopes to extend its outreach. One is the expansion of the Charity Yoga Event to cover other cities across the U.S. Another is what she refers to as the Prison Project; though as-of-yet undefined, it will be centered around providing service and creating projects for both the incarcerated and the recently released. In the very long-term, Bauman hopes to someday find the orphanage she was adopted from, and launch a One Love project to help the children still living there. In the meantime, the Charity Yoga Event is more than enough to work with. “Every year this event brings together the people that enjoy the spirit of yoga both on and off the mat by practicing kindness and compassion,” she said. “It’s a beautiful thing to see so many people share a common goal in helping others.” Charity Yoga Event Where: Embarcadero Waterfront Park When: 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 19 Tickets: $27. Info: http://serveyourheart.org.
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    City selling old reservoir near Kate Sessions Park, housing development planned
    by DAVE SCHWAB
    Aug 09, 2017 | 23825 views | 3 3 comments | 27 27 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    The approximately 4.76-acre reservoir site in north Pacific Beach, is one of the beach community's last remaining developable open spaces offering views to the west. 
    The approximately 4.76-acre reservoir site in north Pacific Beach, is one of the beach community's last remaining developable open spaces offering views to the west. 
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    Some Pacific Beach residents near Kate Sessions Park are upset about the city's plans to sell the old reservoir. The approximately 4.76-acre reservoir site in north PB, is one of the beach community's last remaining developable open spaces offering views to the west.  The property is expected to bring a bid between "$5 million and $10 million” and could be developed into as many as a dozen houses. The city is expected take out the cement reservoir tank, fill it in, and level the area. Property owners nearby have houses currently valued in the $1.5 to $3 million range. One of those neighbors is Lt. Col. David Mulcahy, USMC (Ret) and his wife, Carol. Mulcahy recently dashed off a letter to 2nd District Councilmember Lorie Zapf, arguing the reservoir project has not been properly noticed. “I am baffled by the total absence of any reporting (on the reservoir project) that has not been publicized, or brought to the attention of our neighborhood,” Mulcahy said referencing steps required to remove the Pacific Beach Reservoir tank on Los Altos Road. “Residents surrounding the reservoir have been expecting, literally for years, that this would occur. Many of us have been in touch over the years with various city administration leaders who have consistently assured us that there were no plans to sell the reservoir property.” Mulcahy added neighbors only became aware of the city’s decision to sell the reservoir property last week when a “For Sale” sign was posted at the reservoir.  Another Kate Sessions Park neighbor, Debbie Kostas, expressed other “transparency” concerns about the city project. “The reservoir was dedicated to the community many years ago,” Kostas said. “All of a sudden, the property is for sale in a single-family residential community.” Fellow neighbor Michael Wagner said residents near Kate Sessions are discussing taking action. “I heard the neighbors are going to have an informal meeting over what can be done,” Wagner said. “At one time, I heard the city would make it into a park. But I guess the city needs money to pay for road improvement (yeah, right).” In promotional materials, project developers are characterizing the reservoir project, named Los Altos Summit, as “A once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to acquire an irreplaceable development site in a highly-sought-after residential neighborhood with abundant employment.” It was pointed out by developers that, within one mile of Los Altos Summit, the median home price and per capita income is roughly 70 percent higher than the county average. The median home value in this area was $875,500 in 2016 and is expected to reach nearly $900,000 in 2021.
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    Chris Olson
    |
    August 15, 2017
    This is public land. Should it remain for public use?
    John Floyd
    |
    August 16, 2017
    Yes, this public land should be made into a public park.

    To sell this land would be the equivalent of stealing many millions of dollars from the people.
    Ed Harris
    |
    August 17, 2017
    This should be open space as it is public land. Why would the City bear the cost of removing the old reservoir then sell it to a developer? What is the cost of leveling the land for the developer and what will be the net profit?
    Minis frolic on Fiesta Island; Southern Cal Mini Horse Sanctuary rescues and rehabs mini horses
    by LUCIA VITI
    Aug 08, 2017 | 7083 views | 1 1 comments | 28 28 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Kaila Reeves with her mini at Fiesta Island on Sunday, Aug. 6. / Photo by Lucia Viti
    Kaila Reeves with her mini at Fiesta Island on Sunday, Aug. 6. / Photo by Lucia Viti
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    So Cal Mini Horse Sanctuary held a beach day breakfast and afternoon barbecue on Fiesta Island while spotlighting their function as the world’s largest mini horse rescue/sanctuary.
    So Cal Mini Horse Sanctuary held a beach day breakfast and afternoon barbecue on Fiesta Island while spotlighting their function as the world’s largest mini horse rescue/sanctuary.
    slideshow
    So Cal Mini Horse Sanctuary held a beach day breakfast and afternoon barbecue on Fiesta Island while spotlighting their function as the world’s largest mini horse rescue/sanctuary.
    So Cal Mini Horse Sanctuary held a beach day breakfast and afternoon barbecue on Fiesta Island while spotlighting their function as the world’s largest mini horse rescue/sanctuary.
    slideshow
    So Cal Mini Horse Sanctuary held a beach day breakfast and afternoon barbecue on Fiesta Island while spotlighting their function as the world’s largest mini horse rescue/sanctuary. / Photo by Lucia Viti
    So Cal Mini Horse Sanctuary held a beach day breakfast and afternoon barbecue on Fiesta Island while spotlighting their function as the world’s largest mini horse rescue/sanctuary. / Photo by Lucia Viti
    slideshow
    So Cal Mini Horse Sanctuary held a beach day breakfast and afternoon barbecue on Fiesta Island while spotlighting their function as the world’s largest mini horse rescue/sanctuary. / Photo by Lucia Viti
    So Cal Mini Horse Sanctuary held a beach day breakfast and afternoon barbecue on Fiesta Island while spotlighting their function as the world’s largest mini horse rescue/sanctuary. / Photo by Lucia Viti
    slideshow
    Last Sunday, Fiesta Island celebrated Southern California’s minis – miniature horses that is! So Cal Mini Horse Sanctuary held a beach day breakfast and afternoon barbecue while spotlighting their function as the world’s largest mini horse rescue/sanctuary. Founders Jeanne and Carlos Candelario showcased the equine play day surrounded by minis splashing, jumping and munching on an abundance of hay and treats. The annual event, now in its fourth year, recruited everyone “to see who we are.” “We celebrated the opportunity to gather like-minded owners to meet while introducing ourselves to those who don’t know who we are or what we do,” said Jeanne Candelario. The So Cal Mini Horse Sanctuary is instrumental in the care, welfare and lifesaving of miniature horses. The nonprofit organization uses 100 percent of its donations for the rescue, rehabilitation and rehoming of neglected, abused and abandoned miniature horses. Candelario works “tirelessly” to inform the public on the plight of mini horses because “people do bad things to mini horses. “Caring for a mini is a full-time responsibility not to be taken lightly,” she said. “Minis are not cute dogs. They’re equines. Overbred by backyard breeders, they’re often abused and abandoned.” The So Cal Mini Horse Sanctuary was born serendipitously. Severely injured by a riding accident, “so much so that I thought I’d never ride again,” Candelario purchased a mini, “because I couldn’t give up my love for horses.” Rescuing minis “became a necessity” after realizing the extent of neglect and abuse these animals endured due to a lack of understanding how to properly care for them. Candelario said that minis are often given as presents – grandparents to their grandchildren – but their novelty quickly wanes. “Similar to Easter bunnies, minis are cute at first, then neglected, abused or taken to auction and dumped for money,” she said. “We happily rescue the malnourished and abandoned from questionable fates. Minis enter our sanctuary emaciated, abused and neglected, no doubt on their way to a merciless end. We even cross state lines, literally saving some from death’s door.” The sanctuary began as a private family venture a decade ago because “what better way to teach my boys compassion” while noting that nothing of its kind existed. Minis were rescued from public auctions and selected from “sad” Craigslist ads. Local auctions are noted as the first stop for minis destined for a “darker and crueler” outcome. “Loving minis in need has made us who we are,” she continued. “We rescue minis in terrible conditions at auctions and work as a family to nourish, rehabilitate, love and adopt them out.” Upon their arrival, minis are confused, cognizant of little more than neglect and abuse. Horses purchased from auctions are usually emaciated. Healing with meds and nourishment is only a part of the process. Providing emotional stability is key. “Changing a mini’s state of mind from fear to safety is 90 percent of our care,” continued Candelario. “Within a short period of time our animals understand that they’re in a safe space. They see other horses playing, having fun, and talking to each other.” Noted for excellence in animal husbandry, the Candelario clan – including their three adopted boys – devote every day to caring for minis. Socializing the once terrified horses is imperative. Terrified minis are not adoptable. “Horses, thrown away by those who were supposed to care for them, appear at our gates afraid and untrustworthy,” she said. “We devote time, patience and tender-loving-care in teaching the horses to trust. Through love and nourishment, we heal their mental, physical and emotional health. “My autistic son sits for hours, singing, reading or talking to these animals. Depending upon the animal’s level of abuse, transition can take weeks. Horses make tremendous progress in our care and we work to find them wonderful, forever homes.” Adoptive families are vetted. Because horses are herd animals, horseless homes are required to be adopt in pairs. Bonded horses are also adopted together. Home checks are conducted. “The majority of our minis were left alone for years, never touched, played or properly cared for,” Candelario added. “We refuse to repeat the situation they were rescued from. People don’t spend enormous amounts of time with their horses. Of course, we do, but most feed their minis and move on with their day. We make sure our horses are forever with a buddy. Those who don’t understand, don’t get a horse.” Candelario stressed that although highly intelligent and trainable, minis function as pets or cart animals only. Minis are not ponies, therefore not rideable. Many of So Cal’s mini rescues have knees and legs “blown out” because they’ve been ridden. Horses are “fixed” upon arrival. Pregnant mares are cared for through their pregnancies and healthy babies are given up for adoption. Noting the aid of charitable communities and volunteer “Rescue Angels,” the organization strives to provide safety and care to those rescued and reward them with long, loving lives. “Our network of rescue angels raises funds and pool resources to save as many minis as possible,” she said. “We work with these horses too begin life anew, replacing fear and neglect with love and trust.” Located in Hemet, the five-acre, “extremely clean” facility was verified by the Global Federation of Animal Sanctuaries (GFAS) in 2016 for meeting the criteria as a top-level, accredited equine sanctuary/rescue. The GFAS is also a nonprofit organization dedicated to supporting worldwide animal sanctuaries, rescues, and rehabilitation centers for animals including horses, lions, tigers, bears and elephants. Daryl Tropea, GFAS’s director of accreditation, issued this statement: “The So Cal Mini Horse Sanctuary has shown impressive accomplishments. The GFAS site inspector noted the organization’s excellent husbandry practices and innovative solutions for caring for these smaller equines, often forgotten in this large-equine oriented world. “So Cal Mini Horse Sanctuary has adopted great enrichment and socializing practices, certainly enhancing their suitability for adoption. Verification provides a clear and trusted means for the public, donors and grantors to recognize So Cal Mini Horse Sanctuary as an exceptional organization.” "We’re proud to be part of a world-wide organization dedicated to the care of animals,” continued Candelario. “We hit platinum with this prestigious certification that inspires us to strive even further to provide the best quality of life for the mini horses in our care."  “Every year, the So Cal Mini Horse Sanctuary invites the equine community to meet at Fiesta Island to enjoy swimming with the horses,” said Michelle Motyl of MM Training/San Diego Hunter Jumpers. “We’re grateful for the rescue efforts of these precious minis. We’re thrilled to be a part of the day with Jeanne and team of Rescue Angels!” According to Candelario, miniature horses were bred by the Spaniards 600 years ago. “Royal families bred horses down to size to gift as pets to their children,” she said. “Minis were bred to become smaller, similar to today’s breeding of teacup dogs.” In 1650, King Louis XIV's Palace of Versailles kept the minis as part of his menagerie of unusual animals. Accounts also note that during 17th century, the minis were bred as pets for European Habsburg nobility. To date, the So Cal Mini Sanctuary has rescued more than 100 minis. Invited to attend the 2017 Tournament of Roses Parade, they continue to extend themselves to become a bigger part of community adventures. “Our minis are well prepared for an exciting world,” she said. “We regularly attend holiday parades, community functions, pet adoptions and local equestrian events.” Citing passion and local activism, the So Cal Mini Horse Sanctuary will continue to rescue, rehabilitate and re-home. Stating that “I won’t be here forever,” Candelario is determined to educate others, publicizing, “the more who know, the more who can help.” “We hope to infuse everyone with a strong equine addiction to consider adopting or sponsoring one of our loving horses, or donating to our efforts for caring for them,” concluded Candelario. For more information: So Cal Mini Horse Sanctuary www. socalminihorse.org
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    Carol Santoro
    |
    August 10, 2017
    The amount of time, energy and money that this wonderful family spends rescuing and taking care of these little lives is just amazing. I am fortunate to be a volunteer and get to watch Jeanne, Carlos and their children turn terrified, emaciated, sometimes hurt minis into sweet, curious and trusting animals. The world needs more people like the Candalarios.
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