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    Clean-up completes first step toward Roseville pocket park
    by Dave SCHWAB
    Jan 22, 2015 | 1790 views | 0 0 comments | 2 2 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    The Canon Street clean-up will ideally stop erosion during the pocket park's development.
    The Canon Street clean-up will ideally stop erosion during the pocket park's development.
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    Residents of Point Loma's Roseville neighborhood took the first step in a long-term project, cleaning a vacant lot along Canon Street earmarked for conversion into a pocket park. In what some are calling a “pivotal moment,” Burtech Pipeline on Jan. 10 provided approximately $15,000 in heavy equipment and supplies and, with the help of several community volunteers, cleaned up the .28-acre open space parcel at the upper end of Avenida de Portugal where it dead-ends before reaching Canon Street. Removed were cans, bottles and other urban trash as well as dead acacia trees and tumbleweeds that represented a fire hazard. Also cleared were years of accumulated construction debris: steel girders, cinder blocks, blocks of concrete, dumploads of gravel and once-molten asphalt. Thanks to tree pruning, a dangerous blind curve along Canon Street is now much more visible. It is hoped the clean-up will slow or stop site erosion while money is raised and planning done to develop the park. The small undeveloped parcel on Canon Street was transferred from the Public Works Department to Park and Recreation on June 30, 2014, and is now a designated park site. Peninsula Community Planning Group board members Don Sevrens and Jon Linney have been spearheading the community redevelopment project. Sevrens said they approached the city first about doing site clean-up but were told the city “had no money. “So we asked Burtech,” Sevrens said, “and they agreed to do the work on a Saturday with their own people and equipment at their expense with the help of 11 community volunteers, both neighbors and activists.” Sevrens added the work party was well received. “Motorists driving by gave us the thumbs-up,” he said. “Neighbors left their homes and came up and said, ‘We really approve of what you’re doing. We want a park. Can you put us on a contact/work party list?’” In a community memo, the two planners noted the site cleanup accomplished a number of goals. “Now there is something tangible to see, a blank canvas for the features the public wants,” said their statement, noting, “One possibility is a passive walk-in park with trails, water-thrifty plants and signboards celebrating the Portuguese neighborhood’s historic accomplishments.” Pointing out that “the public will decide what goes in the park,” Sevrens and Linney noted other ideas being floated to redevelop the site include winding trails of decomposed granite with benches, a sculpture celebrating the Portuguese community’s achievements, signboards denoting community history and a playground piece styled after the San Salvador being built at Spanish Landing. “This will be a quiet place,” assured both community planners. “No restroom, no concrete, no Keep Off The Grass sign.” There is much more work to do on the project, which is likely to take three to five years to complete. “We will continue doing outreach, talking to individuals, neighbors and small groups,” said Sevrens. “Once a nonprofit sponsor and financial custodian are in place, we will hold two formal workshops to find out what features the public wants. We will approach the county for a possible grant.” But Sevrens conceded that “most of the money, maybe all,” is going to have to come through private donations. “To that end, we will do everything we can to keep the cost down,” Sevrens said. “If we can quickly land major donations, great. Otherwise, we anticipate opening the park in phases so the public will be able to see and enjoy the park sooner.” The planners said a community workshop will likely be scheduled at Portuguese Hall by early summer to receive public input on the pocket park development project.
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    Ocean Beach restaurateur encourages participation in his pet project
    by DAVE SCHWAB
    Jan 21, 2015 | 2464 views | 0 0 comments | 3 3 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Jeff Levitt, who won a 2014 Humane Society Animal Compassion Award, promotes pet adoptions as part of his campaign on dogs' behalves.
    Jeff Levitt, who won a 2014 Humane Society Animal Compassion Award, promotes pet adoptions as part of his campaign on dogs' behalves.
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    Though he’s not likely to win again this year, Jeff Levitt, co-owner of Shades restaurant in Ocean Beach and the 2014 winner of the Pet-Friendly Business Award, encourages people to participate in the annual San Diego Humane Society competition. The Society’s annual Animal Compassion Awards recognize and pay tribute to extraordinary animals and animal lovers throughout San Diego County. Nominations are collected in three categories: animal impact, humane hero, and pet-friendly destination. Award submissions are being accepted through Feb. 13 for individuals and businesses who’ve demonstrated “an exceptional level of compassion” toward animals. Winners will be featured in the July 2015 issue of San Diego Pets magazine. Levitt was granted the award in the destination category, not only because his oceanfront bistro is pet friendly but also because of the quarterly adoption events he hosts there. The events have led to homes for more than 175 pets in the past two years. 

 “Anything we can do to help promote pet adoptions within the community, we're more than happy to do; it's something we love to do anyway, so it's just been a win-win,” said Levitt. Levitt’s two dogs are like part of his staff. “My dogs are canine ambassadors for the San Diego Humane Society,” he said. “They participate in public functions for the society, like the San Diego County Fair last year, and we take them to places like elementary schools to do community outreach. When the dogs aren’t busy with the society, they sometimes are here at the restaurant greeting guests as they come upstairs.” Winning the society’s animal compassion awards has given Levitt’s restaurant business notoriety. “Last year, the Food Network came down to do a piece on us being pet-friendly,” he said, adding the award “is a big part of our visibility and presence in San Diego because of all the things we do in the dog community.” Levitt noted he’s proud to have contributed to San Diego’s being “one of the pet-friendliest cities in the country.” The restaurateur said he hoped whoever succeeds him as an award winner will carry on with the society’s humanitarian mission. “The society’s goal in 2015 is for no dogs or cats (other than sick or injured) to be euthanized within San Diego,” he said, adding, “It’s a very lofty goal, but I think they’re going to hit it by the end of 2015.” Shades hosts quarterly pet adoption events on the restaurant’s outdoor patio. “We’ll have 50 or 60 dogs on the patio,” he said, adding canines are people pleasers. “Our dogs greet guests coming into our restaurant at the top of the stairs,” he said, “and it’s amazing how their expressions go from scowls to smiling faces and how it has a calming effect.” Shades is a dog-friendly business in dog-friendly Ocean Beach, where even the homeless have pets. Levitt said Shades, as a perk, feeds customers' dogs from the standard menu. “You can order food for your dog sitting on the patio,” he said, “and have chicken or beef served to them in stainless-steel bowls as a treat.” The San Diego Humane Society and SPCA have served San Diego County since 1880, offering a wide range of programs and services that strengthen the human-animal bond, prevent cruelty/neglect, provide medical care and educate the community on the humane treatment of animals. 
The society is supported solely through contributions, grants, investments, proceeds from the Muttique retail store and small fees for services.
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    SeaWorld argue virtues, demerits on planned expansion of orca habitat
    by DAVE SCHWAB
    Jan 16, 2015 | 25617 views | 0 0 comments | 4 4 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    The new orca enclosure at SeaWorld will be expanded by 350 feet across.
    The new orca enclosure at SeaWorld will be expanded by 350 feet across.
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    Is SeaWorld’s plan to nearly double the size of its killer whale enclosure a step forward or a token response to negative feedback from the documentary “Blackfish,” which called the marine park’s business practices into question? That debate was rejoined Jan. 6, when SeaWorld representatives and animal-rights activists from People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) renewed their debate over the marine park’s “Blue World Project” at a meeting of the Mission Bay Park Committee in Mission Beach. Announced last year, the project is a master-planned expansion of the park’s killer whale environment. “We’re going to replace the existing pool in the same place, making it 50 feet deep and 350 feet across,” said SeaWorld spokesman Jerry Howes about the park’s expansion plans to reconfigure the orca habitat by 2018. Details on the project, an informational item only before the park committee, will be presented to the California Coastal Commission for review later this year. Animal-rights activists view SeaWorld’s expansion plans as a negative. “This is clearly a drop in the bucket, a desperate maneuver by SeaWorld to turn back the hands of time when people are learning about the suffering that these orcas go through in captivity,” argued PETA campaigner and spokesman Matt Bruce during broadcast interviews prior to the committee hearing. “It is fluff for visitors and does nothing for the orcas who are still confined to small, barren concrete tanks that they have to swim in in circles with chemically treated water. Even if you make the prison bigger, it’s still a prison.” A handful of PETA protestors stood outside and inside the Santa Clara Recreation Center, where the park committee meeting was held, holding signs protesting orcas being held in captivity, which activists contend is a “failed business model.” “We’re kind of changing our business model right now, building twice as big a habitat for the killer whales, making sure they continue to stay happy, breed and their numbers grow,” answered Mike Scarpuzzi, SeaWorld’s vice president of zoological operations, who defended SeaWorld’s expansion plans as “the best thing for the animals.” Scarpuzzi characterized PETA opposition as “radicals with an extreme point of view that we don’t accept.” Asked about the timing of the orca habitat expansion, coming in the wake of public blowback from “Blackfish” and declining profits from SeaWorld’s three U.S. marine parks, Scarpuzzi said it was “more coincidental than anything. “I’ve been here almost 40 years, and there’s always ebbs and flows in any business,” he said. “There’s no doubt in my mind that SeaWorld is going to be strong and we’re going to continue.” Scarpuzzi added this is the fourth planned expansion of SeaWorld’s orca habitat. He pointed out development of large-scale projects like Blue Ocean “take time,” adding that “we’ve been talking about this expansion for many years.” PETA has challenged the ethics of keeping killer whales captive and profiting from their alleged commercial exploitation in public shows, brought to a flashpoint by the critical documentary “Blackfish.” Bruce noted killer whales dive up to 1,000 feet deep in the wild and swim up to 100 miles a day. “They would have to swim 1,500 laps in their expanded tanks to approximate what they would swim in the wild,” Bruce said. “So this isn’t anything to do with making lives better for these animals.” Scarpuzzi added SeaWorld is now into its fourth generation of orcas bred in captivity in the park, noting the most recent baby was born just 32 days ago. “Killer whales don’t breed if they’re unhappy,” Scarpuzzi contended. “These animals were born and raised here, and now they have their families here.” Asked his impression of “Blackfish,” Scarpuzzi described it as “one truth… Yes, somebody died, but all the rest… is a lot misrepresentations and, frankly, a lot of lies.” Scarpuzzi said the marine park’s main concern is “about our animals and giving them the best environment we possibly can.” Bruce attacked the Blue World Project labeling it as “unnatural” and not in the best interest of killer whales. “If SeaWorld is really interested in changing their image and doing the right thing by these animals, they would release them to seaside sanctuaries, where they can feel the ocean surround them and where they can hear the cries of distant relatives and maybe one day swim free with them,” Bruce said. Asked about SeaWorld’s characterization of them as “radical,” Bruce replied, “There’s nothing radical about caring for these animals, wanting them to be left in the wild to live their lives as nature intended. What is radical is capturing these animals in the wild, artificially inseminating them and forcing them to live in small tanks that are the human equivalent of a bathtub, then forcing them to do tricks for crowds of screaming people.”
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    'Perfect storm' of planning and community involvement hailed as PB, MB head into busy 2015
    by DAVE SCHWAB
    Jan 16, 2015 | 2345 views | 0 0 comments | 4 4 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    'Pothole Patrol' will command a lot of Councilwoman Lorie Zapf's time in 2015.
    'Pothole Patrol' will command a lot of Councilwoman Lorie Zapf's time in 2015.
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    A new councilmember and a more environmentally sustainable approach to community development marked the numerous changes in the make-ups of Pacific and Mission beaches in 2014, and the communities hope for more as they head into the new year. 2015 promises to be a busy one for freshly minted Councilwoman Lorie Zapf, whose District 2 covers the beachfront. Her citywide policy priorities include “finding a solution to our SDPD recruitment and retention problems, increasing the City’s emergency preparedness and resources for our Office of Homeland Security and partnering with MTS to increase transportation options for seniors who can no longer drive.” The Republican also has a number of district-specific priorities. Among them are a “new policy for vacation rentals to protect neighborhood residents.” Zapf said she also intends to lead the charge on plans for potential new uses of the De Anza property while assisting with the creation of the new Point Loma Business Improvement District. She also plans to bring her successful “Pothole Patrol” program to District 2, where her staff proactively reports potholes in the district and gets them in the queue to be fixed. She also will be hosting regular office hours at locations throughout the district to give residents “increased access to their elected official in City Hall.” Chris Olson, a member of beautiful PB and the Pacific Beach Planning Group, gazed into his crystal ball and saw big things ahead. “The perfect storm for planning the Pacific Beach EcoDistrict is arriving on our shores this year,” Olson said. “It is my wish that people catch the wave of community involvement by committing to one or more of the following: educate themselves on the opportunities in our community; join, volunteer for and/or support a community group; attend community meetings and workshops; participate in online surveys/forums on community issues; and encourage our students to get involved in planning the future of their community.” Olson said the top planning opportunities for Pacific Beach community involvement in 2015 include: • Identifying short- and long-term locations for urban agriculture/community gardens, which are in high demand; • Beginning plans for the Pacific Beach Mobility Study if the City wins the $500,000 grant submitted for it, in which case planning will begin for the PB Parks project, including boardwalk widening and a mobility hub at Mission Boulevard to improve infrastructure and increase beach access via multi-modal linkages to the Balboa Trolley Station; • Submitting proposals in February for joint occupancy development at Barnard Asian Pacific Language Academy, plans for which includes a large section along Rose Creek; • Beginning layout of signage and road markers on selected routes of PB Pathways, a network of safe neighborhood routes for pedestrians, while the planning continues for future routes and related improvements; • Finalizing PB Planning Group recommendations for short-term vacation rentals in early 2015 (nothing will change unless the community continues to put pressure on the mayor and City Council); • Taking the finalized joint occupancy agreement between PB Middle School and the YMCA from concept to design; • Amid the De Anza settlement, begin planning the future of Pacific Beach along the eastern bayfront, with possibilities to include De Anza, Campland, Mission Bay Golf Course and other facilities surrounding Mission Bay High School; • Recognizing that every community group has a role in the City of San Diego’s Climate Action Plan, expected to be finalized and adopted in 2015 (the Pacific Beach EcoDistrict is expected to be a leader for CAP strategies); and • Using the $900,000 Sustainable Communities Planning Grant to engage the community in planning transit-oriented development adjacent to the Balboa trolley station, including the eastern portion of Pacific Beach between the I-5 and Rose Creek. “All of these opportunities can be guided by strong community engagement,” concluded Olson. Karin Zirk, founder of the nonprofit environmental group Friends of Rose Creek, said there are a couple of “carryover” issues form 2014 to be addressed. “We’d like to obtain Dedicated Parkland Status for the orphan stretch of Rose Creek,” Zirk said, noting the City of San Diego and the Stormwater and Transportation Department need to survey the land and identify assessor parcel numbers for dedication. “The roughly $300,000 price tag for this is in the proposed budget for the next fiscal year,” Zirk said, adding that parkland dedication will ensure “Rose Creek can fulfill its promise of functioning as a linear park, with bike trails that connect PB and Mission Bay Park with Clairemont and University City. We feel this fits in perfectly with San Diego Audubon's grant to look at restoration possibilities for the mouth of Rose Creek, the De Anza Cove and Campland areas.” Friends also wishes to build its membership base this year and find funding to hire a coordinator for the Rose Creek Watershed. Funding for the existing position ended at the end of 2014. Friends also announced that it will participate in this year's Creek to Bay Cleanup, set for Saturday, April 25.
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    New development, old issues dotted 2014 landscape
    by DAVE SCHWAB
    Jan 16, 2015 | 20797 views | 0 0 comments | 8 8 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Vacation rentals were a big item -- and a big problem -- in the La Jolla of 2014.
    Vacation rentals were a big item -- and a big problem -- in the La Jolla of 2014.
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    It was ring out the old, ring in the new for La Jolla in 2014 as the upscale community lost some of its storied businesses — Jonathan’s Market and Burns Drugs among them — but will be gaining some new ones, like Boffo Cinemas, in 2015. Meanwhile, there were some new developments with “big-ticket items” — seals at Children’s Pool, the Mount Soledad Cross— none of which are likely to resolve the central issues involved: animal rights versus public beach access and the constitutionality of a purported religious symbol on public land. A month-by-month recap of 2014 in La Jolla: JANUARY The city opened a gate in the Cove fence, allowing residents to access the rocks there on New Year's eve with the hope that human access would gradually displace marine mammals and birds and help quell the smell from hell over accumulated bird and marine mammal waste. Jerry Coleman, the voice of the San Diego Padres and the only major league baseball player to see combat in two wars, died Jan. 5. The rechristened Audrey Geisel University House was rehabbed at an estimated $10.5 million to convert it into UCSD Chancellor Pradeep K. Khosla’s home and a venue for special events. The eighth annual Bird Rock home tour showcased some of the finest dwellings throughout the neighborhood on Jan. 25. FEBRUARY La Jolla Brewing Company opened Jan. 30 at 7536 Fay Ave. Stakeholders on short-term vacation rentals began meeting monthly and vetting their concerns at an ad hoc subcommittee of La Jolla Community Planning Association. Though significantly downsized, the controversial Hillel Jewish student center, proposed adjacent to a single-family neighborhood across from UCSD, met with undiminished public opposition by a La Jolla Shores subcommittee, which voted to deny the project’s environmental impact report. Bird Rock Community Council Feb. 4 reported on improvements to La Jolla Hermosa Park, which included picnic tables, benches, charcoal grills and a beach path. Mike Glance of Moonglow Design/Erling Rohde Plumbing, who has found plumbing and art can go together, was profiled in La Jolla Village News. Kayak concessionaires, optical problems with the Shores’ new lifeguard tower and rules regulating commercial vehicles parked in residential neighborhoods were dealt with by the La Jolla Shores Association. Kevin Faulconer outmuscled opponent Councilmember David Alvarez in a hard-fought mayoral runoff. Four alternative routes for the proposed Coastal Rail Trail bike-and-hike pathway project were unveiled Feb. 5 at a public workshop. La Jolla Historical Society marked its 50th anniversary with a yearlong, $1 million restoration of historic Wisteria Cottage. MARCH The Mt. Soledad Memorial Association unsuccessfully petitioned the U.S. Supreme Court for a third time to review Mt. Soledad Memorial Association vs. Steve Trunk, et al. and were turned down once more, with justices declining to hear the case until it is resolved in the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals. Bird Rock Community Council heard renewed complaints from neighbors about off-leash dogs running wild at Calumet Park. La Jolla Village News ran an editorial/cartoon on U-T owner “Papa” Doug Manchester and his penchant for gobbling up independent newspapers. A 30-plus-year battle over historic beach access at Princess Street dragged on as blufftop homeowner Ure Kretowicz vowed to continue the legal battle to prevent people, other than lifeguards during emergencies, to use a beach path crossing his property. La Valencia Hotel exhibited the work of photojournalist Brian Hamill, including such iconic stars as John Lennon, Frank Sinatra and Muhammad Ali. Shores planners heard about problematic homelessness at Torrey Pines Road pedestrian bridge. APRIL Community activist Bernie Segal, trying to get a musical he’s written produced by La Jolla Playhouse, was profiled by La Jolla Village News. The 10th anniversary of La Jolla Concourse d’Elegance classic car show at the Cove went down the weekend of April 11. The annual La Jolla Half-Marathon on April 27 was sold out. Lifeguards requested the city spend more than $5 million over the next five years to beef up equipment and other life-saving services. A community memorial service was held April 12 for Rob Hildt, a town council member who succumbed to cancer. Burns Drugs closed its doors after 62 years on April 15. La Jolla Community Planning Association voted 7-6 to approve an AT&T proposal for installation of a cell tower in Cliffridge Park near Torrey Pines Elementary despite fears about the possibility of negative impacts from electromagnetic tower radiation. MAY On May 9, condo residents near the Mid-Coast Corridor Transit Project, which would bring the trolley from Old Town to UCSD and UTC mall were successful in petitioning the San Diego Association of Governments not to divert the route closer to their complex. The public got a rare behind-the-scenes peek at the Salk Institute with guided tours on April 12 and a presentation by researcher Sreekanth (Shrek) Chalasani. Stakeholders failed to reach agreement on what to do about short-term vacation rentals other than agreeing it was time to put teeth into the police’s Community Assisted Party Program, which penalizes repeat violations for excessive noise and other infractions. Attorney Steve Haskins was sworn in May 8 as La Jolla Town Council’s new president. Adolfo Fastlicht and Carlos Wellman announced plans for Boffo Cinemas, a boutique theater with indoor dining, to replace Jonathan’s Market with a premium multiplex theater. Sidewalk cafes became bones of contention between some residents who believe the sidewalks should be free for pedestrians and others who feel increasing the amount of outdoor dining space is more important. La Jolla’s annual Fourth of July fireworks display, threatened yet again by funding problems, was saved at the last minute and the show went on as usual at the Cove. Scripps La Jolla was named one of the nation’s 100 best hospitals. San Diego Community Newspaper Group publisher Julie Main wrote about her trip to Kenya in Africa. JUNE La Jolla Village Merchants Association announced development of LaJollaopoly, a fundraising board game based on the world-famous Monopoly model. La Jolla Village News profiled Orangetheory, a new fitness modality at 7734 Girard Ave., which uses high-tech workouts maximizing metabolic “burn.” Columnist Linda Marrone wrote about the declining numbers of monarch butterflies. Advocates launched a drive to secure disabled-ramp access at Children’s Pool. Community planners balked at plans to bring bikeshare short-term bicycle rentals to La Jolla. Che Café, a celebrated UCSD vegan eatery and art/music venue, was the topic of an eviction notice. On June 16, Mayor Kevin Faulconer and police Chief Shelley Zimmerman held a community parley at La Jolla Rec Center. The business practices of Schroeder Piano Company in Bird Rock were called into question by mostly local residents who claimed their consignments had been mishandled. JULY The fifth annual La Jolla International Fashion Film Festival was held July 23-26. La Jolla Village Merchants Association voted unanimously to consider “adopting” the annual Cove Fourth of July Fireworks Display. Bird Rock Community Center was updated by the city on plans to repair Midway Bluff. La Jolla Shores Association vetted neighborhood concerns about increasing noise and congestion from commercial kayaking. Boffo Cinemas’ design plans and George’s at the Cove restaurant terrace expansion were approved by La Jolla Planned District Ordinance. A plan to raise the city’s minimum wage incrementally to $11.50 an hour by 2017 was passed by the City Council and later rescinded, with the issue to be placed on a future election ballot. A partnership agreement unanimously approved by San Diego Unified School District gave La Jolla Cluster Association’s five schools greater flexibility and autonomy. Local Israelis and Palestinians renewed dialogue amid conflicts in the war-torn Middle East. AUGUST Tara Moore, former Jack’s La Jolla bookkeeper, was convicted of embezzlement Aug. 4. She did not testify during her seven-week trial. Overriding objections by beach-access proponents, the California Coastal Commission Aug. 14 unanimously endorsed a five-year ban on public access of Children’s Pool during the marine mammals’ five-month pupping season. On Aug. 18, the City Council overrode Mayor Kevin Faulconer’s veto of a proposal to phase-in a higher minimum wage over the next three years. The suicide of beloved comedian Robin Williams was lamented by La Jolla Village News editor Martin Jones Westlin, who commented on the movie star’s connections to La Jolla. These included his participating in the San Diego Challenged Athletes Foundation’s annual October triathlon fundraiser. SEPTEMBER SeaWorld announced plans to double the size of its orca environment in San Diego. The Village of La Jolla was a target of city code enforcement cleanup efforts to eliminate illegal signage and intrusions into the public right-of-way. Plans were set in motion to “polish the jewel” as merchants association board member Nancy Warwick announced a new fundraising campaign, Sparkle & Shine, involving banners to generate funds to clean sidewalks and beautify the Village. OCTOBER The sixth annual La Jolla Art & Wine Festival went off Oct. 11-12 in the Village, with the addition of stein-holding contest. California Gov. Jerry Brown signed legislation banning plastic shopping bags starting in the summer of 2015. Pillage the Village Halloween trick-or-treating, co-sponsored by La Jolla Village Merchants Association and La Jolla Real Estate Brokers Association, got bigger and better with more downtown merchant participation. Cove stench from marine mammal and bird waste at the Cove continued to be a problem and an issue of public debate. Beach-access proponents Friends of Children’s Pool filed a suit in Superior Court Oct. 10 alleging city mismanagement of the pool and violation of constitutionally protected ocean access. NOVEMBER I-5 traffic was halted for a time as UCSD students protested the Ferguson, Mo. decision not to indict a white police officer in the fatal shooting of a black teenager. San Diego City Council Nov. 18 unanimously endorsed a water recycling program to provide one-third of San Diego’s potable water by 2035, reducing reliance on costly imported water. La Jolla Rec Center celebrated its 100th anniversary. Larry Himmel, TV newscaster and former stand-up comic at La Jolla’s Comedy Store, succumbed to cancer at age 68. Bird Rock Community Council heard complaints about “mansionization” in the neighborhood. Shores merchants and neighbors complained of disruptions caused by ongoing infrastructure replacement along the small commercial strip on Avenida de la Playa. DECEMBER On Dec. 5, famed wildlife photographer Thomas Mangelsen visited his Images of Nature Gallery, at 7916 Girard Ave., to clue the public in on his latest retrospective book, “The Last Great Wild Places.” La Jolla Community Planing Association nixed a revamped proposal for a manse on Whale Watch Way as well as voting down a proposed Alzheimer’s unit in the former Chopra Center building downtown. The 57th installment of the La Jolla Christmas Parade & Holiday Festival delighted residents and visitors on Dec. 7. The five-month ban of humans at Children’s Pool took effect Dec. 15. Village merchants were informed by neighbors of a new problem, recycling scavengers pillaging the Village and parking their smelly, leaky open-bed trucks in nearby residential neighborhoods such as Park Row.
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    News
    Surfers honor legend with paddle-out
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    Jan 23, 2015 | 0 0 comments | 2 2 recommendations | email to a friend
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    Sports
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    Jan 23, 2015 | 0 0 comments | 5 5 recommendations | email to a friend
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    Arts & Entertainment
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    Jan 23, 2015 | 1 1 comments | 5 5 recommendations | email to a friend
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    Business
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    Jan 23, 2015 | 0 0 comments | 3 3 recommendations | email to a friend
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