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    Mayor plans to reopen Ocean Beach Pier on May 23
    May 20, 2019 | 5413 views | 0 0 comments | 13 13 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    The Ocean Beach Pier has been closed since January. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    The Ocean Beach Pier has been closed since January. / Photo by Thomas Melville
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    Mayor Kevin Faulconer is scheduled to reopen the Ocean Beach Pier during a ceremony starting at 8 a.m. on Thursday, May 23, weather permitting. “Repairs are on schedule to have the pier opened by Memorial Day,” said City spokesman Alec Phillip. “City crews did the railing, water and sewer work. SDG&E crews did the work on the electric line.” Repairs estimated at a cost of $430,000 by City officials were made to the iconic OB Pier, which has been closed since mid-January when strong winter storms and king tides damaged the structure. City staff determined more than 2,200 feet of guard rail, electric, water and sewer lines needed serious repair or replacement. At more than 1,970 feet, the Ocean Beach Pier is the second longest on the West Coast, and the longest concrete pier in the world. The pier opened in 1966 and more than 500,000 people visit it every year.
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    It’s official, City’s new scooter regulations to start July 1
    May 14, 2019 | 28476 views | 3 3 comments | 22 22 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Electric scooter riders head north up the boardwalk near Thomas Avenue in Pacific Beach. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    Electric scooter riders head north up the boardwalk near Thomas Avenue in Pacific Beach. / Photo by Thomas Melville
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    On May 14, the City Council unanimously approved the new electric scooter regulations, which will go into effect July 1. The new rules will decrease the allowable speed of electric scooters from 15 to 8 mph on the boardwalk, and to 3 mph in high-traffic areas with the use of geofencing technology. Scooters are to be banned from parking near hospitals, schools, near Petco Park, and on the boardwalk. Electric scooters and bikes are prohibited from riding on city sidewalks. Key components of the regulations include: ·Speed limits: In specific geofenced areas, operators will slow scooters to 8 mph. Three of the geofenced areas are pedestrian-only and operators will slow scooters to 3 mph with a push message notifying riders to leave that area. ·Geofencing will be in effect for beach-area boardwalks, Balboa Park, NTC Park, Mission Bay Park, Petco Park and the pedestrian-only locations, including North/South Embarcadero, MLK Jr. Promenade, and La Piazza della Famiglia. ·Staging: Operators will no longer be able to stage scooters and e-bikes on sidewalks in downtown. The City has identified – and is currently installing – 330 on-street dockless parking corrals throughout downtown where staging is allowed. ·In the beach areas, operators are only permitted to stage in groups of up to four, with 40 feet in between each group. The City will identify corral locations in the beach areas and, once installed, will require their use.The City also will conduct an evaluation of locations throughout San Diego where designated parking corrals would be beneficial and, working with the City Council and communities, install more. ·Rider parking: Operators will prohibit riders from ending a ride in specific geofenced areas, including beach area boardwalks. ·Education: Consistent messages about local and state laws in smartphone applications will be required. As will on-device labeling about age requirements and how riding on the sidewalk is illegal. ·Per device fee: A per device fee of $150 annually will be assessed. A reduction of $15 per device will be offered for operators offering a qualified equity program. ·Equity programs may include discounts, equitable distribution, credit-card free unlock or mobile-device free unlock. ·Data sharing: A variety of data will be shared about ridership, parking, paths of travel and more to assist the City in transportation planning, Climate Action Plan reporting and enforcement. ·Indemnification/insurance: Operators will be required to indemnify the City from liability and to hold a $2 million per occurrence, $4 million aggregate and $4 million umbrella insurance policy. ·Performance bond: Each operator will be required to pay a “Safety Deposit” – $65 for each device in fleet – to be held in the event the company leaves the market without its devices.  The ordinance will charge dockless companies an annual $150 per-device fee. The City noted that should act as a de facto cap on scooter numbers. “If we could do a rewind, I would have banned this entire thing from the city from the start without regulation,” District 2 Councilmember Dr. Jen Campbell said previously. District 1 Councilmember Barbara Bry said she plans to propose an ordinance to ban electric scooters from the boardwalk.
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    SDDTres
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    May 15, 2019
    Will this be enforced? I’m doubtful.

    Riding escooters on the sidewalk and multiple riders on a single escooter are already illegal, yet I’ve never seen law enforcement react to these common occurrences.
    Craig in PB
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    May 14, 2019
    Typical SD City politics - Ready, Shoot, Aim. I think that this is a start - of course, all of the policing seems to be done via the operators via their technology. What recourse are we going to have if they aren't following the speed limits? As a parent to an 8 year old - I would love them being banned on the boardwalk - it is so unsafe with all the joy riders now - we watched 2 kids aged 10 zooming in and around walkers, cyclists, strollers, seniors etc.
    Beteur Dawler
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    May 15, 2019
    Why they would allow motorized devices on something called a board WALK?

    Pacific Beach boxer fights for her place in the 2020 Olympic Games
    by VICTORIA DAVIS
    May 14, 2019 | 1623 views | 1 1 comments | 18 18 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Danyelle Wolf, Pacific Beach’s three-time national championship fighter, trains for the Olympics.
    Danyelle Wolf, Pacific Beach’s three-time national championship fighter, trains for the Olympics.
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    Danyelle Wolf
    Danyelle Wolf
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    It had been four years since Danyelle Wolf, Pacific Beach’s three-time national championship fighter, had been in a boxing ring. That is, until this past January, when her boxing coach, Basheer Abdullah at Arena MMA gave her some news: Wolf’s weight class had been added to the 2020 Olympics. It was time to get back in the ring. “For so many years when I was just doing boxing, I had to fight to keep my spot on Team USA, but I had the confidence to do it, because I really felt like, ‘This is mine,’” said Wolf. “But after being out of the game for so many years doing martial arts … I just didn’t feel like it was mine anymore.” There were plenty of worries surrounding Wolf aiming for the Olympics — the fact that she only had five weeks to prepare for the Olympic qualifiers and that she was newly recovered from surgery after dislocating an arm and tearing her labrum while training overseas in Thailand. Wolf says choosing to get back in the ring was a “mental battle with myself.” But she took the chance, loving, as she says, “a solid challenge” and ended up winning all three bouts of the U.S. Olympic qualifying event in Las Vegas in March. Despite being almost 10 years older than most of her competitors at 35, and having spent all of the last four years training in martial arts, not boxing, Wolf once again proved the value of a strong and stubborn drive. “I do humbly take credit for talking her back into boxing,” said Abdullah with a laugh. “If I didn’t believe she had an honest shot at making the team, I would not have asked her to come back. I would have let her focus on her MMA career.” “She’s not just a born athlete, she’s extremely intelligent, almost obnoxiously so,” added Carl Gebhardt, Wolf’s MMA coach at San Diego’s Steel Gym. “She has this mix of tenacity and instinct. She’s unapologetically Danielle and she’s not afraid to go out and take what she wants.” Going pro had always been the goal for Wolf, ever since she made the decision in 2009 to live off her savings and “see what I was made of” as an athlete. But, leaving her job as a life coach in Rancho Santa Fe to train for Iron Man races and Triathlons in Pacific Beach, Wolf did not plan on boxing being the source of her success. But then, fate stepped in. “I had just moved to San Diego and everywhere I went people would ask me, ‘So, are you a fighter?’” said Wolf, who was 25 at the time. “I wasn’t sure what they meant at first. I was like, ‘A fighter for what? For Jesus? For cancer?’ Martial arts wasn’t even on my radar.” Though she has played almost every other sport under the sun from basketball to field hockey, Wolf said boxing was “probably the only sport I hadn’t tried yet.” After continuing to be asked “Where do you fight?” by perfect strangers over the following weeks, Wolf said her interest was peaked. “I also was starting to worry about if my nose looked messed up,” said Wolf. “I couldn’t figure out why so many people kept mistaking me for a fighter? But now, years later, I believe those people must have been guardian angles directing me to where I was always supposed to go.” Two years after picking up her first boxing glove, Wolf began fighting with team USA and traveling around the world, competing in South Korea, Guadalajara and Venezuela. Wolf has won ring-side world championships, Jiu Jitsu World League championships, national Golden Gloves and had opportunities to be in ESPN’s 2014 Body Issue and go to the ESPY Awards, walking the red carpet with The Rock. But this multi-dimensional fighter’s biggest opportunity yet comes in December, when Wolf will have to beat out seven other women in the final stage of the U.S. Olympic trials to earn a spot on the national team. “We have a lot of females as young as 6 in this gym who want to be fighters and they really look up to Danyelle,” said Gebhardt. “The competition is going to be steeper in December and then it will obviously be even more challenging in the Olympics. But I know Danyelle, I know her mindset and how hard she’s been working. She has a goal in front of her and I know she’s going to be fine.” “I’m all about perseverance and digging deep to find the highest potential within yourself,” added Wolf. “I want to show women that doors open for you when you give 100 percent. The trick is being ready when it’s time to jump at the chance to walk through them.”
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    Max Epaud
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    May 15, 2019
    Wow. Brains, beauty, and brawn. Danyelle for President.
    Walk, Bike, and Roll in Pacific Beach during National Bike Month
    by DAVE SCHWAB
    May 12, 2019 | 5687 views | 0 0 comments | 15 15 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Cora Matchett riding in the bike rodeo led by the SD County Bike Coalition at Kate Sessions Elementary. / Photo by Katie Matchett
    Cora Matchett riding in the bike rodeo led by the SD County Bike Coalition at Kate Sessions Elementary. / Photo by Katie Matchett
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    It was a field day on May 8 for cycling advocates in Pacific Beach and region-wide with everyone getting into the act, even kids, who biked to school in a promotion dubbed Walk, Bike, and Roll. The special day in May was part of National Bike Month, which includes National Bike Day, celebrated nationwide on May 17, and on May 16 in San Diego. “It’s like the holiday season for us,” said Andy Hanshaw, executive director of the San Diego County Bicycle Coalition. “National Bike Month grew from Bike To Work Day and Bike to School Day came as part of bike month. It’s just an organic way for a lot of different organizations concerned with bicycle safety and advocacy that ties everything together.” Bike to Work Day was originated by the League of American Bicyclists in 1956 to increase public interest in biking and promote it as an alternative for commuting to work.  The 29th Annual SANDAG Bike to Work Day May 16 was organized by the SANDAG iCommute program. It offered 100 pit stops where cyclists could stop for tune-ups and to pick up free T-shirts, snacks and receive encouragement. There were a couple of pit stops in Pacific Beach, including one at Pacific Beach Taylor Branch Library. As part of outreach to employers during Bike Month, iCommute offers free bike safety checks, bike safety classes, and guided rides to show groups of employees safe routes to commute to work. For more information visit icommutesd.com. Katie Matchett of PB participated in the May 8 Walk, Bike, and Roll, sponsored for the second year by beautifulPB, a volunteer public nonprofit promoting environmental and economic sustainability. “We had everybody not only bicycling but walking to school, anything besides being driven,” said Matchett. “The idea was to get kids, as well as parents, teachers and staff, excited about alternative travel modes such as bicycling, walking and scootering.” Community volunteers handed out prizes and snacks the morning of May 8 as kids arrived at school, said Matchett, noting, “Later that day some of the schools held special events (bike rodeos at Sessions, a walk safety assembly at St. Paul’s). Barnard also held a bike safety assembly on May 10 with the SD Bike Coalition.” Local businesses donating prizes to the event included PB Bike Garage, Pacific Beach Bikes, Kono’s, Broken Yolk Cafe and Mr. Frostie. “We had lots of donations and prizes from local bike shops and from Mr. Frostie and some local real estate offices,” added Matchett. “Most of the schools did raffles to give away stuff, everything from bikes to push scooters, stuff for kids to excel out there.” Hanshaw said bike to school and bike to work days deliver a “bigger message about promoting active living and safe commuting.” He added promoting active movement while implementing safe streets and infrastructure “encourages more kids to ride bikes to school. It’s about our climate, our future. It’s the quality of life.” Pointing out bicycling is a year-round activity in San Diego, Hanshaw said, “We want to encourage people to bike more often as a means to get around, not just in May.”
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    La Jolla Playhouse announces WOW Festival line-up
    May 11, 2019 | 13285 views | 0 0 comments | 27 27 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Senior Prom by San Diego Dance Theater. / Photo by Manuel Rotenberg
    Senior Prom by San Diego Dance Theater. / Photo by Manuel Rotenberg
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    La Jolla Playhouse recently announced initial programming for its acclaimed biennial Without Walls (WOW) Festival, a four-day explosion of site-based and immersive performances, taking place Oct. 17-20 at Arts District Liberty Station, in partnership with the NTC Foundation. The WOW Festival line-up will feature three Playhouse-commissioned projects: Ikaros, by the internationally-renowned, New York-based Third Rail Projects (Then She Fell); Las Quinceañeras, by acclaimed local designer and Arts District Liberty Station resident artist David Israel Reynoso/Optika Moderna (2017 WOW Festival’s Waking La Llorona, Punchdrunk’s Sleep No More); and Written in Stone, a series of five 10-minute, site-specific plays, produced by the Playhouse’s 2019 Resident Theatre Backyard Renaissance.   The WOW Festival will also include pieces by preeminent international companies: Boats by Australia’s Polyglot Theatre (2013 WOW Festival’s We Built This City); ¡Vuela!, by Mexico’s Inmigrantes Teatro (Playhouse’s Kikiricaja); Hidden Stories by France’s Begat Theatre; and Peregrinus, by Poland’s Teatr KTO; as well as works by acclaimed local artists, including Senior Prom, by the Arts District-based San Diego Dance Theater (2015 WOW Festival’s Dances With Walls) and Hall Pass, by Blindspot Collective. Additional projects, including many family-friendly offerings, will be announced at a later date. Tickets for WOW Festival performances, ranging from free to $35, will go on sale this summer. For more information, visit LaJollaPlayhouse.org.   “This initial WOW Festival line-up showcases a myriad of extraordinary artists from around the globe who will offer audiences a series of intriguing and transformative experiences that place the audience right in the center of the action,” said Playhouse artistic director Christopher Ashley. “And I couldn’t be happier that these experiences will all take place at Arts District Liberty Station – an iconic San Diego gathering place and an ideal location for this community-wide celebration of immersive and site-inspired work.” The 2019 WOW Festival will be curated and produced by Playhouse associate producer Teresa Sapien. Similar to past festivals, this exciting event will serve as a cultural and artistic hub, centered around the Show Imaging Festival Stage, where patrons can gather to experience WOW performances, hear live music, engage in lively discussions about the work, and enjoy the many food and drink options on offer at Liberty Station. “The Arts District is looking forward to hosting all these creative artists from around the world at our beautiful campus in Point Loma,” said Alan Ziter, executive director of the NTC Foundation. “Programs like La Jolla Playhouse’s WOW Festival are what the community envisioned for the former Navy base’s new mission as a vibrant new San Diego center for arts, culture and creativity. We’re excited about our partnership with La Jolla Playhouse and for what the community will see at the Festival.” Since its inception in 2011, Without Walls (WOW) has become one of San Diego’s most popular and acclaimed performance programs. This signature Playhouse initiative is designed to break the barriers of traditional theatre, offering immersive and site-inspired works that venture beyond the physical confines of the Playhouse facilities. Over the last nine years, the Playhouse has been commissioning and presenting a series of immersive and site-specific productions at locations throughout the San Diego community, including Susurrus (2011), The Car Plays: San Diego(2012), Sam Bendrix at the Bon Soir (2012), Accomplice: San Diego (2013), El Henry (2014), The Grift at the Lafayette Hotel (2015), The Bitter Game (2016), What Happens Next (2018), as well as the 2013, 2015 and 2017 WOW Festivals. The WOW Festival is made possible in part through the generous support of the Wallace Foundation, the James Irvine Foundation, the San Diego Commission for Arts & Culture, Show Imaging, the FACE Foundation and Delta Airlines.  For more information, visit LaJollaPlayhouse.org. WOW Festival Projects Boats By Polyglot Theatre (Australia) At a central mooring place, large lightweight boats wait patiently for children’s imagination and energy. Once aboard, the boats are propelled by a flurry of feet, with kids working as a crew for their own voyage across the high seas. As the boats journey, Polyglot artists float as castaways to be rescued or as mysterious elements of the urban ocean. Together artists and children guide their boats to safe harbor, ready for new crew and the next adventure! Hall Pass By Blindspot Collective (San Diego) Hall Pass is a collection of short plays and musicals by rising talents, including Emily Kaczmarek (2018 Jonathan Larson Grant Recipient), Trevor Bachman (2019 Joe's Pub Residency Artist) and Elizabeth Irwin (My Mañana Comes at San Diego Rep). Set and performed throughout a high school, the show offers a glimpse of the world young people navigate every day. Brimming with moments any former teenager will recognize and relish – as well as those they might rather forget – audiences choose their own adventure as they experience the trials and triumphs of the class of 2022. Hidden Stories By Begat Theater (France) Hidden Stories is an invisible performance, a site-specific event that blends itself into the urban landscape. Supplied with headphones, the audience is temporarily endowed with the power to hear the thoughts of certain passers-by and to follow them into the unknown. The city is transformed into a sound stage, the audience’s eye is the lens of a camera, and the spectator is the editor, choosing which images to synchronize to the sound track being played in their ears. A single rule of thumb: follow an ordinary object (an orange, a newspaper, a box of matches, a pen) as it makes its way through the streets of the city.  Ikaros La Jolla Playhouse Commission By Third Rail Projects (New York) Commissioned by the Playhouse, Ikaros is an experiential collection of dreams, myth, film, poetry, dance and performance – an audience-centered narrative framed as an audio “walking tour” though a desert path, on the grounds of a former naval base – which sits across from, and shares the sky with, an active international airport. All of these layers fold into one another to create a series of vignettes and rites of passage that follow a cartography of flight and failure, and an odyssey of transformation. Peregrinus By Teatr KTO (Poland) A 45-minute roaming spectacle, inspired by the poetic universe of T.S. Eliot, Peregrinus depicts a single day in the lives of people whose existence is summed up by the journey between home and work. A mischievous and wildly kinetic examination of 21st century office-workers that illuminates the unpredictability of the mundane.   Las Quinceañeras La Jolla Playhouse Commission By David Israel Reynoso/Optika Moderna (San Diego – Liberty Station) From the creators of the groundbreaking Waking La Llorona, Las Quinceañeras offers a surreal, immersive, multisensory exploration of the famed rite of passage undertaken by many Latinas on their 15th birthday. The mysterious OPTIKA MODERNA opens its doors once again after years of secrecy and seclusion, inviting participants to undergo their latest procedure “Proyecto (15).” Those interested can book an appointment to meet with OPTIKA MODERNA’s staff of trained paranormal opticians. Within the lab, patients will experience a hallucinogenic journey into the early 1990s as they relive the fateful events surrounding the celebrations of multiple Quinceañeras. Senior Prom San Diego Dance Theater (San Diego – Liberty Station) Senior Prom is a production of San Diego Dance Theater’s (SDDT) Aging Creatively senior dance program. SDDT Artistic Director Jean Isaacs has created a fun evening to highlight this innately humorous, immersive, inter-generational event. Forty dancers perform in a wide variety of prom-like activities, including line dancing, spiking the punch bowl, and crowning the King & Queen. In addition to Isaacs, choreographers include SDDT founder George Willis with Andromeda Bradley, John Diaz, Yvonne Gagliardo, Betzi Roe and Mitchum Todd. The evening is hosted by Ms. Tendu (played by Patti Coburn) and Wolfman Jack (played by Steve Baker). Take a walk down memory lane and join the party! Prom attire encouraged!  ¡Vuela! By Inmigrantes Teatro (Mexico) ¡Vuela! The title alone is a nod to the seemingly impossible. Four battered and crippled birds desperately beat their wings in an attempt to return to flight alongside their flock as they flee the arrival of a hurricane. Not able to lift themselves more than a palm’s length, they helplessly contemplate their luck at being abandoned by the rest, the model birds, the healthy and strong. Instantly, the most basic questions arise: How will they fetch water? Or food? Will they really be able to survive without the help of their tribe? This is a play about solidarity, teamwork and the ability to adapt and put on a brave face despite life’s difficulties. Written in Stone La Jolla Playhouse Commission By Backyard Renaissance Theatre (San Diego) Hidden corners of Stone Brewing’s Liberty Station Bistro & Gardens serve as the setting for five new site-specific 10-minute plays. Audiences will travel to five locations and witness stories that were inspired there and penned by La Jolla Playhouse- commissioned playwrights Mashuq Deen, Shairi Engle, Frank Katasse (They Don’t Talk Back, presented by Native Voices during their Playhouse residency), Daria Miyeko Marinelli and Marisela Orta.  WOW Festival Biographies Backyard Renaissance presents theatre with an “art to the gut” sensibility and believes that exceptional storytelling is rooted in a sense of joyful play, human connection, and gutsy intensity. The company was founded in 2015 by artistic director Francis Gercke and executive director Jessica John Gercke.  With the addition of producing director Anthony Methvin, the company has produced nine productions including the San Diego Premiere of Parlour Song by Jezz Butterworth, The Elephant Man by Bernard Pomerance, the San Diego Premiere of Gutenberg: The Musical by Scott Brown and Anthony King, Abundance by Beth Henley, the San Diego Premiere of Bachelorette by Leslye Headland, The Zoo Story by Edward Albee, Mr. & Mrs. Fitch by Douglas Carter Beane and the world premiere of Tarrytown by Adam Wachter, which was named Best Original Musical by the San Diego Critics Circle in 2017.  Backyard Renaissance also presented the San Diego premiere of Noah Haidle’s Smokefall while in Residence at La Jolla Playhouse and is proud to present Shelagh Stephenson’s An Experiment with an Air Pump as its next La Jolla Playhouse Production in Residence this August. Founded in 1992, Begat Theater uses public space as a venue to explore private and subjective experiences. Recognized for its innovative and contemporary performances, the company has been touring for 25 years in France and abroad. Recent works include Les Demeurees, a theatrical installation; Hidden Stories, an invisible performance; and La Disparition, which places portable media devices in the hands of an active audience. Askip*, an immersive show is currently touring French middle schools allowing students and adults to follow and hear the thoughts of an 8th grader, her teacher, and a janitor on one particular day. The company develops its work and operates a Residency Center for the Arts in Gréoux-les-Bains in the south of France. Hidden Stories is supported by FACE Contemporary Theater, a program developed by FACE Foundation and the Cultural Services of the French Embassy in the United States with the support of the Florence Gould Foundation, the Ford Foundation, Institut français-Paris, the French Ministry of Culture, and private donors. Blindspot Collective develops radically inclusive programming that cultivates new work, emerging artists, and diverse audiences. The company has collaborated with The Old Globe, Diversionary Theatre, UC San Diego Department of Theatre and Dance, and other community partners since being founded in 2017. Their inaugural projects were two site-specific and immersive musicals: Last Night in Town, based on the songs of Ben Folds; and Hall Pass, commissioned by New York University and produced in partnership with Playwrights Horizons Theatre School as part of the Future of Storytelling Festival. The company has received acclaim for its original work, including Untold, a verbatim play about mental illness that won the Dunn-Rankin Award for New Work at the 2017 San Diego Fringe Festival; The Magic in this Soul, another verbatim play about discrimination and resilience that won the Audience Favorite Award at the 2018 San Diego Fringe Festival; and Qulili, a documentary play based on the stories of local refugees supported by the Critical Refugee Studies Collective. The company also develops Forum Theatre for youth audiences, including Safa’s Story and Danny’s Story, which allow young people to consider the complexities of difference and prejudice. Combined, those two productions have been seen by over 6,500 students in the 2018-19 academic year. Inmigrantes Teatro is an independent group of experienced creatives in the Mexican theatre field. Based in Baja, California. Their goal is to create productions geared to audiences on both sides of the Mexico-United States border. Founded in 2005 by Raymundo Garduño, the company debuted with the play Naufragios (Shipwreck). The improv show Los Improductivos (The Improductives) followed in 2007. Inmolación (Immolation) opened in the summer of 2010, with book by Enrique Olmos and directed by Raymundo Garduño. The piece was selected by CECUT (Centro Cultural Tijuana) as part of their Education Series Program and it represented Baja California in the International Borders Theatre Festival (2012) and FESARES Baja California State Theatre Festival (2013). Kikiricaja debuted in 2011 and ran at La Jolla Playhouse in 2015. With a state government grant called PECDA, Inmigrantes Teatro was able to put together No Tocar(Do Not Touch) by Enrique Olmos in 2013. In 2014 they premiered two plays also by Enrique Olmos, Hazme un hijo (Make Me a Child), and their latest play Dios es un bicho (God Is a Bug) which had its world premiere at the Children’s Theatre festival. Optika Moderna is a ground-breaking, immersive company led by San Diego's David Israel Reynoso, the Obie Award-winning costume designer for the Off-Broadway runaway hit Sleep No More (Punchdrunk/Emursive). At La Jolla Playhouse, he designed Queens, Tiger Style!, Waking La Llorona (2017 WOW Festival), Liz Lerman’s Healing Wars (2015 WOW Festival) 2015 and The Darrell Hammond Project. His other regional scenic and costume design credits include The Old Globe, American Repertory Theater, Commonwealth Shakespeare Company, Lyric Stage and Gloucester Stage, among many others. He is the recipient of the Elliot Norton Award in Costume Design and a multiple nominee for the IRNE and BroadwayWorld awards. Polyglot Theatre is Australia’s leading creator of interactive and participatory theatre for children and families. Their distinctive artistic philosophy has placed them at the international forefront of contemporary arts experiences for babies and children up to 12 years of age. Inspired by artwork, play and ideas of children, Polyglot Theatre creates imagined worlds where audiences actively participate in performance through touch, play and encounter. Polyglot Theatre is assisted by the Australian Government through the Australia Council, its arts funding and advisory body, the Victorian Government through Creative Victoria and the City of Melbourne. San Diego Dance Theater is led by artistic director Jean Isaacs, an award-winning choreographer whose work has been presented in Switzerland, Germany, China, Mexico, Guatemala, Canada and Poland, as well as on both coasts of the US. She is the originator of the annual site-specific project Trolley Dances and co-founder of the San Diego Dance Alliance, Three's Company and Dancers, and Isaacs/McCaleb & Dancers. Her work has been commissioned by the San Diego Opera, La Jolla Playhouse, The Old Globe, Goodman Theatre, San Diego Rep, Berkeley Repertory Theatre, Long Wharf Theatre, and for Brooklyn Academy of Music. She collaborates frequently with numerous cross-border partners, creating the Festival of Mexican Contemporary Dance at San Diego State University. Recent awards include the San Diego Critics Circle Award, Bay Area Theatre Critics Award, two California Arts Council Choreography Fellowships, Distinguished Teaching Award at UC San Diego and the California Dance Educators Associate Artistic Award. Isaacs taught technique, choreography, and improvisation at UC San Diego’s Department of Theatre and Dance for 25 years. San Diego Dance Theater is in residence at ARTS DISTRICT Liberty Station.  Teatr KTO was established in 1977. In the company's 42nd year of operation, over 30 productions have been performed indoors and outdoors in Poland and around the world, which have been seen by more than three million people. The group has visited nearly 250 cities in over 40 countries on five continents. Since January 2005, the Teatr KTO has had the status of a municipal theatre in Krakow. For 42 years now the company has been managed by its current director Jerzy Zon. Third Rail Projects has been hailed as one of the foremost companies creating site-specific, immersive and experiential performance. The company is led by artistic directors Zach Morris, Tom Pearson and Jennine Willett, and is dedicated to re-envisioning ways in which audiences engage with contemporary performance. The company’s currently running, award-winning immersive hit, Then She Fell, was named as one of the “Top Ten Shows of 2012” by Ben Brantley of The New York Times.  They have made work in New York and nationally since 2000, with projects including Ghost Light at Lincoln Center Theater, the immersive theater hit The Grand Paradise in Brooklyn, Sweet & Lucky with Denver Center for the Performing Arts, and Learning Curve in Chicago with Albany Park Theater Project, as well as internationally through the Global Performance Studio (GPS), which combines the company’s creative and educational offerings through a program of cultural listening and exchange. Third Rail Projects has been the recipient of several prestigious awards, including two New York Dance and Performance (Bessie) Awards; a Chita Rivera Award for Choreography; two CEC Artslink Back Apartment Residencies (Russia); a Theater Fellowship from the Bogliaco Foundation (Italy); an IllumiNation Award from the Ford Foundation and National Museum of the American Indian; and more. Third Rail Projects’ artistic directors were recently named among the 100 most influential people in Brooklyn culture by Brooklyn Magazine. Visit thirdrailprojects.com to learn more.
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    Record-setting Pointer baseball season comes to abrupt end
    There were looks of shock and disbelief on the faces of Point Loma High's baseball players, excruciating expressions as their last batter was unable to beat out an infield grounder and the realizat...
    Published - Monday, May 20
    full story
    New La Jolla custom furniture business will create the perfect piece for your space
    Imagine this: you’ve found a couch you love, but it’s too big for your living room, or too small for your office, or the color doesn’t quite match the palette in your den. While that might have bee...
    Published - Sunday, May 19
    full story
    A wonderful, liberal education — Scripps College in the 1940s
    After a long interlude, I am resuming where I left off regarding my life story… In the summer of 1944, I gave the graduation speech at Beverly Hills High School about coming to America as a refugee...
    Published - Sunday, May 19
    full story
    Mesa College's Golden Scissors Fashion & Awards Show
    San Diego Mesa College presented the 38th annual Golden Scissors Fashion & Awards Show at the Sheraton Hotel and Marina on May 3. The show featured runway creations by Mesa College Fashion Design s...
    Published - Sunday, May 19
    full story
    University City news briefs and updates
    Taste of the Triangle EdUCate’s 25th anniversary celebration at the Taste of the Triangle on May 3 was a vibrant and mouthwatering affair held at Pirch Westfield UTC. The venue was the perfect sett...
    Published - Saturday, May 18
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    Education Notebook: Pacific Beach Middle Strings Concert set for May 28
    Pacific Beach Middle - Music is in the air at PBMS! Music director John O'Donnell will be leading his music students in the final concerts of the school year. The Strings Concert is on Tuesday, May...
    Published - Saturday, May 18
    full story
    Belmont Park brings back 'Five After 5' May deals, and other things to do this weekend
    Belmont Park recently launched its second annual “Five After 5” promotion featuring weekday and weekend deals throughout the park and boardwalk for $5 after 5 p.m. every day through May 31st. Anyon...
    Published - Friday, May 17
    full story
    La Jolla High baseball: The benefit of another spring
    La Jolla High baseball coach Gary Frank descended into the pit, which is the home dugout at Muirlands Middle School, wearing a grin from ear to ear. His left-fielder, Calvin Hyytinen, had just “lai...
    Published - Friday, May 17
    full story
    Judge orders DNA test for Fiesta Island gasoline splasher
    A judge on May 16 ordered a man awaiting trial for dousing a woman with gasoline to submit his DNA to authorities so DNA from a gasoline container can be compared to his own. The trial of Myles Edw...
    Published - Friday, May 17
    full story
    Suspect in Ocean Beach murder case pleads not guilty
    A man accused of killing his mother in Ocean Beach has pleaded not guilty from his hospital bed where he is recovering from gunshot wounds from police. Daniel Chase McKibben, 36, is accused of kill...
    Published - Friday, May 17
    full story
    Surfer receives 5 year prison sentence for assault at Sunset Cliffs
    A judge on May 16 rejected probation for a surfer convicted of assaulting another surfer with a paddleboard and imposed five years in state prison. Paul Taylor Konen, 34, had been free on $30,000 b...
    Published - Friday, May 17
    full story
    Current Issues(Archives)
    San Diego Uptown News, May 17-30th, 2019
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    San Diego Uptown News, May 17-30th, 2019
    La Jolla Village News, May 17th, 2019
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    La Jolla Village News, May 17th, 2019
    Beach & Bay Press, May 17th, 2019
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    Beach & Bay Press, May 17th, 2019
    The Peninsula Beacon, May 10th, 2019
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    The Peninsula Beacon, May 10th, 2019