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    Point Loma High holds 92nd commencement ceremony
    by SCOTT HOPKINS
    Jun 20, 2017 | 8867 views | 0 0 comments | 11 11 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    The traditional cap toss to end the ceremony. / Photo by Scott Hopkins
    The traditional cap toss to end the ceremony. / Photo by Scott Hopkins
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    A grad about to walk across the platform. / Photo by Scott Hopkins
    A grad about to walk across the platform. / Photo by Scott Hopkins
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    The processional heads into the stadium. / Photo by Scott Hopkins
    The processional heads into the stadium. / Photo by Scott Hopkins
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    Gabriel Hall, with family, was listed among Honor Roll graduates and will be attending SDSU.  / Photo by Scott Hopkins
    Gabriel Hall, with family, was listed among Honor Roll graduates and will be attending SDSU.  / Photo by Scott Hopkins
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    Grads listen to a speech during the ceremony. / Photo by Scott Hopkins
    Grads listen to a speech during the ceremony. / Photo by Scott Hopkins
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    On an unusually warm spring day, a westerly breeze carried waves of mixed emotions across some 380 members of the Point Loma High Class of 2017 and their assembled families and friends on June 14. Everyone smiled while scanning the rows of shimmering maroon gowns and, as names were called, shouts of love and support were heard. And yes, many were seen wiping tears of joy from their faces.
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    Class of 2017 graduates from Mission Bay High
    by DAVE SCHWAB
    Jun 19, 2017 | 6429 views | 0 0 comments | 15 15 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Mission Bay High students celebrate their graduation on Wednesday, June 14. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    Mission Bay High students celebrate their graduation on Wednesday, June 14. / Photo by Thomas Melville
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    A student hugs Mission Bay High teacher Lauren Filamor during commencement ceremonies. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    A student hugs Mission Bay High teacher Lauren Filamor during commencement ceremonies. / Photo by Thomas Melville
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    Students celebrate after receiving their diplomas. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    Students celebrate after receiving their diplomas. / Photo by Thomas Melville
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    A Mission Bay High senior receives her diploma during commencement exercises. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    A Mission Bay High senior receives her diploma during commencement exercises. / Photo by Thomas Melville
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    Students react right at the moment they're told they have graduated. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    Students react right at the moment they're told they have graduated. / Photo by Thomas Melville
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    Mission Bay High School Class of 2017's graduation ceremony June 14 was an ending – and a beginning for more than 220 seniors. It was a familiar theme, along with school pride, that cut across the speeches of the commencement program. Speakers included senior class president Jacquelyn Macias, MC Laura Barton, co-valedictorians Alexandra Briski and Emery Reyna, principal Ernest Remillard and San Diego Unified School District Board Trustee Dr. John Lee Evans. “We finally achieved the most important goal – graduation,” said Barton during opening remarks. Macias noted the Class of '17 began as “a mass of individuals trying to find our way,” and ended with “memories of special friends that will stay in our hearts forever. We are, and always will be, Mission Bay Buccaneers.” Briski and Reyna, who shared valedictorian honors as well as a 4.55 grade point average, were brief – but pointed – in their remarks. “I've never particularly liked endings, the last day of vacation, or the last chapter of a great book,” Briski confessed, adding, “Today we leave behind friends and teachers who have truly influenced our lives forever.” Briski said: “I have thoroughly enjoyed the past four years at Mission Bay High School. With each new page, new understanding. With each new chapter, new growth in our lives.” Briski concluded, “We've reached the end of this speech, and of high school. Go Bucs. Go Bears.” In her speech, Reyna praised the athletic accomplishments of MBHS, which she noted included “a fledgling (women's) lacrosse team that won a CIF championship,” and an internationally renowned music program. Reyna invoked the wisdom of Einstein who said, “Everybody is a genius. But if you judge a fish by its ability to climb a tree, it will live its whole life believing that it is stupid.” “Some of us are fish that are meant to swim,” noted Reyna. “I'm proud to be recognized as valedictorian, and proud, though I'm not able to climb trees, to do what I'm truly designed for. This chapter in my life is close to an end. I will now have the freedom to explore what I am inspired to be.” Remillard praised the Class of '17 noting, “I am confident that they will do amazing things in the real world. You have raised the bar for future Mission Bay graduates.” But Remillard cautioned students saying, “Your journey isn't over. My challenge to the Class of 2017 is going to remain in place: Continue to work hard, challenge yourself as opportunities come your way.” In closing, MBHS's principal exhorted graduates to “always be respectful, appreciate your life experiences.” Remillard closed with, “Go Bucs.” SDUSD trustee Evans read a statement in Spanish then translated. “There is not one way,” he said. “You make your way as you begin walking. Some of you know exactly what you are going to do. Others of you have absolutely no idea. And others are in-between. That's all ok, because this is the beginning of your journey starting here today.”
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    Fall in love with Ocean Beach all over again: 38th annual Street Fair and Chili Cook Off a summer tradition
    by BART MENDOZA
    Jun 19, 2017 | 4077 views | 0 0 comments | 11 11 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    More than 70,000 people attended the Ocean Beach Street Fair last year. / Photo by Jim Grant
    More than 70,000 people attended the Ocean Beach Street Fair last year. / Photo by Jim Grant
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    One of San Diego’s most beloved annual traditions, the Ocean Beach Street Fair and Chili Cook Off, returns for the 38th year on June 24, along Newport Avenue. Themed this year to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the 1967 “Summer of Love,” the free, all ages, street fair kicks off at 10 a.m., with more than 70,000 people expected to attend and plenty of music, art, food and fun for everyone. Beyond the usual enjoyment of walking around the event and taking things in, the street fair offers a myriad of opportunities to get involved, from making music to painting murals. Fairgoers will find five stages featuring a wide range of San Diego’s top talent, carnival rides and games for all ages, a chili cook off, a beachside beer garden, a community mural, an artist’s alley with unique creations, a musical petting zoo giving young fair goers an opportunity to try an instrument and much more. “It’s amazing to see how the street transforms into the street fair,” said Ocean Beach Main Street Association executive director, Denny Knox. “There’s so much to see and do, it’s hard to pick a favorite thing, but the food and especially the music are big draws.” The music at the street fair this year includes such names as groove band DJ Williams with members of Karl Denson’s Tiny Universe, singer-songwriter Jeff Berkeley, award-winning indie rockers The Verigolds and home town heroes, rockers Bad Science Fiction. According to Ted Wigler, who books the main stage in addition to Winston’s, he and co-booker music producer Michael Head, who also books the weekly Farmer’s Market, are open to all types of music, but there are some guidelines. “We want quality of course, someone with a name that means something outside, but not too big where it might cause problems from a crowd standpoint,” he said. “We’re very cognizant that this is an all-ages event.” Wigler is happy to be involved with the event “It gives me the opportunity to give back to my community, which has given me so much,” he said. “It’s a way to be involved and not just picking up trash, this is something I like to do.” He also likes the collaborative nature of the event. “It’s great to have a chance to work with Michael Head and everyone at the OBMA, there is such a strong sense of collaboration.” Head, for his part, considers music to be vital to the event. “It kind of dictates your day,” he said. “Where you're gonna be and when. I think it's a major part of the draw. I mean music, with the ocean and chili? What could be better?” Beyond appealing to new audiences, artists involved are happy with the overall positive nature of the event. “I'd start by saying that anything going on its 38th consecutive year was a good idea to begin with,” said Chuck Schiele, who will be performing at the street fair with his band Bad Science Fiction. “The Street Fair is emblematic of the best features of San Diego,” he said. “There is a strong sense of community in OB, more than most neighborhoods, so I cite that as the number one attraction. Everything about the event comes from a positive place, and therefore exudes a profound positive vibe.” One of the street fair’s unique attractions is music center, Rock ’n’ Roll San Diego, which will host an area on Newport Avenue, complete with a KISS tribute band in residence, a musical petting zoo and a live band made up of the school’s instructors, who will also be giving free 15 minute lessons to fairgoers. “We want to show that music is something anybody can do and have fun with. We can have you onstage with one of our bands in minutes, playing a classic rock song,” said Langford. “We don’t just get young folks for this,” he continued. “We get some adults all the way up to grandpas, all ages are welcomed and encouraged.” Select lucky fans will also get a chance to play with the KISS tribute band, who will be decked out in their traditional make up and costumes, but also be sporting some ’60s gear to fit in with the street fair’s theme. “We’ve done the event for several years now and it’s so much fun meeting people and seeing the neighborhood come together like this. I enjoy the celebration of life. Everyone coming here is doing so to have a good time, enjoy the sunshine, music and food.” While music is a big part of the street fair, for many, the food is also a major draw. “There is an amazing array of vendors this year, all sorts of fun stuff,” said OBMA office assistant Claudia Jack. Amongst the culinary treats this year will be Barrett's Lemonade, which uses the whole lemon in their drinks, Say Cheese, which will offer cheese curds and poppers, Ledesma Concessions, which will have non-alcoholic pina coladas, served in a pineapple, and Mighty Foods, which will offer such treat as sushi burritos and Thailand Ice Cream rolls. “You can stop in at any of the booths or restaurants along the way, but we also have contests that are a lot of fun,” Jack said. In addition to the chili contest, eaters with a competitive nature can also enter the “Hodad’s Burger Eating” contest and the “Best Bloody Mary in OB” contest, the latter featuring samples from 15 different area bars and restaurants. Meanwhile, if you are more artistically inclined, you can also take part in creating a community mural. Children and adults of all ages are welcome to purchase a $15 square at mural area on Bacon Street just south of Newport. After the street fair, the murals are sealed and installed in the community. “That’s a favorite activity, every year,” Jack said. “It’s wonderful to see youngsters creating their art.” Despite all the hard work putting on the Ocean Beach Street Fair, Knox considers the efforts well worth it, though she doesn’t have time to enjoy the fruits of their labor on the day. “We have 150 or more volunteers and we don’t catch our breath until after 10 p.m. when it’s over,” she laughed. “We’re all still in awe,” she said. “We worry if anybody will come and then when we see the crowds and people having fun, it’s exhilarating.” Anyone wanting to avoid the parking and traffic mayhem near the fair itself has several options. For bicyclists, the San Diego County Bicycle Coalition will provide a free bike valet area on Bacon Street at Newport Avenue. Meanwhile those with cars can drop off their vehicles and grab a trolley, running from 9:30 a.m. until 9 p.m., to the fair from either the Sunrunner lot at the corner of Pacific Highway and SeaWorld Drive or the lot near Robb Field at 2244 Bacon St. The trolley drops passengers off in the artist’s alley section of the street fair.
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    Night golf glows from fringe to fun tee times at The Loma Club
    by MANNY LOPEZ
    Jun 17, 2017 | 7088 views | 0 0 comments | 10 10 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    A golfer chips onto the green during a Glow Golf event at The Loma Club in Liberty Station. / PHOTO CONTRIBUTED
    A golfer chips onto the green during a Glow Golf event at The Loma Club in Liberty Station. / PHOTO CONTRIBUTED
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    Glow Golf, an entertainment idea akin to black light or “cosmic” bowling, has been making its way onto the fairways of The Loma Club in Liberty Station. Operated by Nightlife Golf, founder Josh Van Dermark promises golfers that the experience is not just another shot in the dark. Van Dermark said that events are designed to provide a more party-like atmosphere, where golfers play on an LED lit, 9-hole, par-3 course using special glow-in-the-dark balls. The experience is enhanced with music, beverages and contests. “It’s a great way to have a night out that’s not at a bar,” he said. “I think we need more night time experiences that are fun, and where you can get out and do things as opposed to going out to a nightclub.” Van Dermark said that events are set up to accommodate up to 100 players on the course with groups starting and ending at the same time. He added that rounds typically last under two hours. Timothy Smith, general manager of The Loma Club, said that a par-3 course made sense for Glow Golf, because of the timeliness of games, less-complicated greens, lack of need for a golf cart and the lower skill level required. He said that it’s easier to play 1,280 yards on a 9-hole, rather than 6,500 yards on an 18-hole golf course. “It’s meant to be more of a social activity,” he said. “Josh has put together a golf festival with competitions, prizes and plenty of decorative lighting.” Events are scheduled to happen once per month, with the next one planned for June 24. General admission tickets include a round of golf, and two glow-in-the-dark golf balls. According to Van Dermark, the genesis of the Glow Golf idea came one Friday evening after work, while trying to schedule some time to play a round of golf with friends. Unable to find a time that worked for all, the group thought of buying glow-in-the-dark golf balls and sneaking onto a course to play, but luckily for them, they couldn’t find the product at any of the local sporting goods stores. “That saved us the trouble of having to trespass or get a drunk in public ticket,” he said. “But it got me thinking that if I’m looking for it, other people must be doing the same.” Van Dermark said that now more than ever, people are conflicted with just being too busy working. He added that it’s hard sometimes to find time for personal enjoyment, so he set out to flip the golf world upside down and try to throw a party at night where people can play golf. “Glow Golf may not be the cheapest version of night golf there is, but it’s actually the best,” Van Dermark said. “Our mission is to get rid of the pretentious nature surrounding golf, and make it a fun accessible thing for everybody.”
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    Kitten Nursery announces 10,000th arrival, and he needs a name
    Jun 16, 2017 | 10223 views | 0 0 comments | 13 13 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    He was just weeks old when he came to the San Diego Humane Society’s Kitten Nursery.
    He was just weeks old when he came to the San Diego Humane Society’s Kitten Nursery.
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    Bottle-fed and cared for around-the-clock by experienced kitten caregivers and medical staff, he is growing up strong, fluffy and playful, and will soon be ready for his public debut.
    Bottle-fed and cared for around-the-clock by experienced kitten caregivers and medical staff, he is growing up strong, fluffy and playful, and will soon be ready for his public debut.
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    He was carried in a tattered cardboard box, seven other littermates pressed up against him. Terrified and hungry, he wanted his mama. A compassionate person found him and his littermates abandoned on the side of the road and knew just where to bring them. He was just weeks old when he came to the San Diego Humane Society’s Kitten Nursery. His story is not unique – it’s one that’s seen each and every day at the Kitten Nursery, but what does make this kitten unique is that he is the 10,000th arrival at the country’s first 24-hour Kitten Nursery. His survival now depends on the caregivers at the Kitten Nursery. Bottle-fed and cared for around-the-clock by experienced kitten caregivers and medical staff, he is growing up strong, fluffy and playful, and will soon be ready for his public debut. “Neonate kittens are the most vulnerable animal in shelters and I’m extremely proud that San Diego took the lead to establish a 24/7 nursery in 2009 to reduce the needless euthanasia of underage orphan kittens,” said Dr. Gary Weitzman, president and CEO of San Diego Humane Society. “Most shelters simply don’t have the resources to care for fragile kittens around-the-clock. We’re very grateful to our staff, volunteers and donors who enable our important lifesaving work.” Very young, orphaned kittens need to be bottle fed every 3-4 hours and receive the same attention they would normally receive from their mothers. This comprehensive care is vital to both their physiological and behavioral development during this critical time period in their young lives. Once kittens reach about 4-5 weeks of age, they are typically moved to foster homes for socialization until they are old enough for adoption. “Since ours opened as the first 24-hour kitten nursery in the country in 2009, more than a dozen organizations across America have followed our lead by opening other nurseries in their communities; including national agencies like the American Society for the Prevention and Cruelty of Animals and Best Friends,” said Morgan Hill, director of nursery and foster for San Diego Humane Society. “We’re so proud that this lifesaving model is being replicated to save even more animals.” “I’m excited and amazed that we’ve reached such a milestone at the Kitten Nursery,” says Jackie Noble, Kitten Nursery supervisor. “We have so many incredible people working very hard to care for these tiny babies, but it’s a labor of love – we all love saving kitten lives.” Kitten number 10,000 is currently in foster care until he’s old enough to be adopted. San Diego Humane Society is holding a naming contest – submit your suggested name for the 10,000th kitten here: https://sdhumane.org/10000kittens/.
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    Current Issues(Archives)
    Ocean Beach Street Fair & Chili Cook-Off Guide 2017
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    Ocean Beach Street Fair & Chili Cook-Off Guide 2017
    The Peninsula Beacon, June 22nd 2017
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    The Peninsula Beacon, June 22nd 2017
    La Jolla Village News, June 16th, 2017
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    Beach & Bay Press, June 15th, 2017
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