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    Wild, wilder and wildest plans for wetlands in Mission Bay – ReWild’s proposal restores marshland habitat
    by DAVE SCHWAB
    Jan 23, 2019 | 1940 views | 0 0 comments | 2 2 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    A cattle egret finds a meal in Mission Bay. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    A cattle egret finds a meal in Mission Bay. / Photo by Thomas Melville
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    Mission Bay is a microcosm of the worldwide battle being waged to save remaining dwindling wetlands. That battle is being played out locally with ReWild Mission Bay, a project of San Diego Audubon and its partners to enhance and restore wetlands in Mission Bay’s northeast corner. ReWild Mission Bay’s proposal is to enhance and restore more than 150 acres of wetlands in the northeast corner of Mission Bay, including the enhancement of 40 acres of existing tidal wetland habitat. The project will also create approximately 100 acres of tidal marsh and mudflat habitat and 30 acres of transitional/upland habitat. The timeline for the high-profile project calls for it to be considered by the City Council sometime this year. The project would also ultimately have to be approved by the California Coastal Commission. Mission Bay’s wetlands supply habitat for hundreds of local wildlife species, protect San Diego from climate change impacts such as flooding, and improves area water quality. “What we have here is an opportunity, by doing a large-scale, meaningful wetlands project, to correct the imbalance that has long favored commerce and recreation at the expense of the environment,” said ReWild project manager Rebecca Schwartz Lesberg. “During the past century, Mission Bay has been converted from a rich natural treasure into a heavily developed recreational area,” said Julia Elkin with the California State Coastal Conservancy. “People have lost the opportunity to really experience nature along the shoreline in Mission Bay. This is an unprecedented opportunity to restore a small piece of what was lost.”  “We are excited to work with the City and all of our partners to see this vision implemented,” said Chris Redfern, executive director of San Diego Audubon, about ReWild. “This is the only way to protect the bay’s few remnant wetlands, which provide crucial habitat for wildlife, from disappearing in the coming years due to sea level rise.”  Noting society views climate change as “complicated and far away,” Schwartz Lesberg pointed out Mission Bay’s remaining wetlands is “really close on our coastline and something we can do something about.” Audubon and allies have presented three alternative proposals – wild, wilder and wildest – for Mission Bay wild lands restoration. “Wild” would provide the lowest amount of wetlands habitat, exclusively within the areas of Campland on the Bay and De Anza Cove.  “Wilder” uses soil excavated from Campland to shallow approximately 38 acres of open water to create mudflat and salt marsh providing greater resiliency to sea-level rise.  “Wildest” proposes using soil from both Campland and De Anza Point to restore mudflat and salt marsh providing the greatest resiliency to sea-level rise of all three alternatives. ReWild recently released its highly anticipated final conceptual plans in a 350-page Feasibility Study Report outlining how wetlands can be restored to protect wildlife and the communities. The three plan options presented include expanded public access and habitat restoration options, as well as cost estimates and sea level-rise modeling.  Mission Bay’s habitat has changed drastically over time. In the late 1800s, Mission Bay was a 4,000-acre mosaic of wetland habitats sprawled across the mouth of the San Diego River.  For millennia, this wetland complex supported Native American communities relying on the Bay’s natural resources, and was home to tens of thousands of migratory waterfowl and shorebirds.  However, during the past several decades, much of the natural resources of Mission Bay have been altered, beginning with “Derby’s Dike,” built in 1853, to re-route the San Diego River. That began 150 years of large-scale alteration of the bay that nearly obliterated its natural biodiversity.  Of the 4,000-acres of wetland habitats that once existed, only 40 acres – 1 percent – remain.  ReWild conceptual plans for wetlands restoration, and all of the analysis that went into them, were presented to the public during a December workshop at Mission Bay High School. For more information on ReWild Mission Bay and to access the full report, visit rewildmissionbay.org.
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    What to expect in 2019? We asked local psychics for predictions
    Jan 23, 2019 | 2823 views | 0 0 comments | 4 4 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Dr. Alexandra Andrews of the nonprofit Alexandra Institute and bookstore at 3545 Midway Drive, Suite G, in Point Loma.
    Dr. Alexandra Andrews of the nonprofit Alexandra Institute and bookstore at 3545 Midway Drive, Suite G, in Point Loma.
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    Using Tarot, a local psychic foresees Trump’s re-election, a change of direction in world outlook, and future problems with over reliance on technological causing people to be more out of touch with themselves and each other. That’s what was in the cards for Jonathan Marks of Metaphysical Solutions at 1330 Garnet Ave. in Pacific Beach. Of Eastern European lineage, Marks claims his family, especially the women, have been psychic. As we gaze ahead in the new year, Beach & Bay Press talked to Marks along with two other local avowed psychics – Dr. Alexandra Andrews of the nonprofit Alexandra Institute and bookstore at 3545 Midway Drive, Suite G, in Point Loma, and Tera Brennan of Energy Arts Academy at 2180 Garnet Ave. – to divine what the future may hold. All three professed psychics share one common belief: That everyone has psychic potential, though that potential rarely manifests itself. “Everybody is spiritually attuned in their own way,” said Marks, who said he did his first psychic reading at age 13. “Everybody has the ability to be psychic, empathic, experiencing other people’s feeling through prophecy, dreams and connecting to the spirit world.” Andrews defined what being a “psychic” means. “A psychic is someone who uses their mental processes, is able to turn it on and off,” she said, adding, “It’s different than intuition. People who are psychic are able to unlock that within themselves.” Brennan, who claims to be clairvoyant, said that, as a psychic, she has taken perception to a higher level, a “higher octave,” in her own words, which she claims allows her to “see spiritual energy.” “I help people develop great meditation practice to heal themselves and to be balanced and grounded in their lives and connect with their own spirit, and find deeper peace,” she said. Getting back to his predictions, which he did by phone, Marks noted, after doing a Tarot card spread, that what he saw was that the past couple years, 2017-18, was a “deconstruction of ourselves with disappointment and setbacks,” regarding people in general worldwide. But that’s about to change, he added. “I see a lot of people experimenting, a lot of separation (from the past) with a majority of people physically moving and moving away from toxic relationships with their families or others,” said Marks adding, “People are going to be very connected into the future.“ But Marks warned: “I also think there’s going to be a lack of privacy in the future. Technology is going to be separating, disassociating, people more from other humans. This could be a big problem in the future.” Concerning politics, Marks said, “What I’m seeing is Trump being elected to a second term.” Marks also made a prediction about the current government impasse. “People have got to hang in there, “he counseled. “The shutdown will end soon. [Trump] got what he wanted, and now he’s going to move into other areas.” Andrews, as she does for everyone during a Tarot card reading, asks the person being read to shuffle the deck with their left hand (their psychic intuitive side) to “put their vibrations” into the cards. The person being read is then asked to randomly select a dozen or more cards from the deck arranged in a spread. “Your energy is going to be there,” Andrews said of the process, where she picks up on the way the cards are laid out in the spread, which suggests tendencies. Using the spread, Andrews then goes on to evaluate/interpret specific areas, as directed by the client, counseling them as to what the cards show in terms of answering their questions about relationships, careers, etc. Andrews does group and individual readings. She was also asked in the past to help out in a police homicide investigation. “[The police] brought me a bloody leather jacket that was found near the scene of a motorcycle accident,” she said. Did the police eventually find the suspect they were looking for? “Yes, they did,” Andrews replied. Beach & Bay Press asked Brennan to use her psychic abilities to gaze ahead to see what is going to happen with two high-profile issues in San Diego: homelessness and motor scooters. Following a phone conversation, and after consulting the cards, Brennan foresaw a positive outcome, ultimately, with homelessness. But, she added: “Too many people are affecting the situation. It’s getting muddied. There are too many ideas coming from an intellectual standpoint. It would be better if it was just one group. But in the end, it’s very positive. The answer will come through a creative housing solution, a creative way that maybe people aren’t totally thinking of now.” Regarding the proliferation of motor scooters, Brennan said: “We need to put a limit on that, and there’s totally going to be a limit put on that. The number of them are also going to be limited down. I see something happening very soon, in March, and again in November.” Of the impetus for dealing with the scooter situation, Brennan said, “The energy behind it, it reminds me of the energy riding the waves.” Psychic Predictions Trump re-election; Government shutdown will end soon; More people moving away from toxic relationships; More lack of privacy due to technology; Creative housing solution will happen for homeless; Number of electric scooters to be limited in March.
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    Community briefs for Ocean Beach and Point Loma
    Jan 19, 2019 | 13363 views | 0 0 comments | 9 9 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    King tides are returning to San Diego Jan. 20-21. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    King tides are returning to San Diego Jan. 20-21. / Photo by Thomas Melville
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    VOTE FOR OCEAN BEACH BUSINESS OF THE YEAR Voting is open for Ocean Beach Customer Service Business of the Year. Put on by Ocean Beach MainStreet Association, the award was created for the local business that best exemplifies the spirit of the community and reflects positive awareness through their exceptional customer service. The winner must be a member in good standing of OBMA. The winners will be announced at the OBMA Annual Awards celebration on Jan. 24. To vote, visit surveymonkey.com/r/OBCustomerServiceAward. PENINSULA COMMUNITY CONVERSATION A community discussion event hosted by the Point Loma Association, featuring free food and a cash bar, will take place 5:30 p.m. Jan. 22 at Portuguese Hall Point Loma, 2818 Avenida De Portugal. Panelists will field questions directly from the audience. The panel will feature: Fred Kosmo, Peninsula Community Planning Board; Andrea Schlageter, Ocean Beach Planning Board; Mark Winkie, Ocean Beach Town Council; Denny Knox, Ocean Beach MainStreet Association; Lt. Danny Grubbs, SDPD Western Division; David Martin, Point Loma Association; Clark Anthony Burlingame will be the moderator. PHIL’S BBQ POINT LOMA LOCATION CLOSES FOR RENOVATION Popular barbecue spot Phil’s BBQ closed its location at 3750 Sports Arena Blvd., on Jan. 2 to get started on a $1.5M renovation. According to Fox 5, updates to the restaurant will include an expanded dining and bar area, additional TV screens and a paint job. “We’re committed to re-investing in our restaurants to make sure we continually offer guests the best and most up to date dining experience,” owner Phil Pace said in a written statement. “More than one million customers walk through the Phil’s BBQ Point Loma doors per year – it was time for an upgrade.” The restaurant is expected to be shut down for over a month, with the reopening date currently set for Feb. 2. In the meantime, customers can enter the “Shutdown Sweepstakes” contest for a chance to win $2,500 in cash and a $2,500 gift card to Phil’s BBQ. Don’t worry, you can still get your Phil’s BBQ fix. The chain’s locations in Santee, San Marcos, and Rancho Bernardo will stay open during the renovation – and offer all-day happy hours. Visit philsbbq.net. CROWN ACE HARDWARE TO CLOSE Crown Ace Hardware recently announced plans to close its store at Liberty Station. Originally opened in August 2008, the store will serve customers through mid February and will offer some significant discounts throughout the entire store. "Closing a store’s always tough because it impacts our customers and our employees; and we do not do so lightly," said Mark Schulein, president of Crown Ace Hardware. "We've been fortunate to serve customers here for over 10 years and have built meaningful relationships with the community in that time; and are very sad to close. “We truly love this store and our team; and we worked extremely hard to make it a success in the community. Unfortunately, the location proved to be challenging, and we opened while the center was both very new and in the midst of the Great Recession. These factors had lasting impacts, which we were not able to overcome.”  Schulein added that “We are working closely with our team members to offer positions in our other stores in San Diego or with other Ace retailers in the area.”  Crown will continue to serve customers at their locations in Clairemont, Encinitas and Carlsbad. OB PLANNING BOARD APPROVES MIXED-USE BUILDING The Ocean Beach Planning Board voted 11-1 recently to approve the development of a two-story mixed-use building consisting of two dwelling units and two commercial spaces located at 4870 Voltaire St. (Dover Plumbing property). The Board thanks all the community members who attended the meeting and provided input on this project. CLASSICAL GUITAR AND BEYOND A winter adventurous guitar concert that will take you from the classical realm to the ethnic spontaneous dynamic world of music will take place 7 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 26 at Point Loma Assembly, 3035 Talbot St. Come to admire the mastery of guitar playing of three renowned guitarists: well established, accomplished and sought after San Diegan George Svoboda and Fred Beneditti will be joined by a special guest, direct from the Czech Republic, Standa Barek. European delicatessens and refreshments are also available for your enjoyment. For tickets or information, call 619-788-7428. NEW AGENT AT COLDWELL ASSOCIATES There’s a new face at the Ocean Beach office of Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage. Thomas Fessler has associated as an affiliate agent. “I love to help people through difficult situations, and because of my experience in Kundalini Yoga and energy work, I can energetically and spiritually enhance the quality of a client's home,” said Fessler. OB MAN NAMED LAWYER OF THE YEAR An Ocean Beach man was recently named “Best Lawyer of the Year” for 2019 by U.S. News & World Report and Best Lawyers. Kevin F. Quinn, a senior partner at Thornes Bartolotta McGuire in downtown San Diego, was recognized for his distinguished reputation for taking tough cases other lawyers avoid to trial — and winning them. He received an Outstanding Trial lawyer Award for one of the first elder abuse death cases tried under a newly enacted state law in 1998, the Outstanding Trial Lawyer of the Year in 2010 and achieved the victory for the largest single-plaintiff verdict in the state of California for 2010. He also was among the first to volunteer as a pro-bono representative for the families of those who were killed in 9/11. BARONS MARKET BACKROOM BEER PAIRING  Barons Market is teaming up with Refuge Brewery for its first Backroom Beer Pairing of 2019. Held on Jan. 30 from 6 to 8 p.m., the stockrooms of seven different Southern California Barons Market locations will be transformed into speakeasies to raise money for local elementary schools and education foundations. “Refuge Brewery and Barons Market both come from close-knit communities of the Southern California region,” says Rachel Shemirani, senior vice president of Barons. “We decided this event should raise money for local schools, so each Barons Market will pick a school of their choice to donate to.” One hundred percent of proceeds from the event are donated to a school or charity. Last year, the event raised over $25,000. This year, Barons Market and Refuge Brewery combined their areas of expertise to create a one-of-a-kind menu, which includes: • Baja Crush: a hazy IPA with a hint of citrus, paired with Asian chicken tacos with zesty slaw and spicy mayo. • Blonde Ale: the beer’s refreshing and smooth flavor profile goes well with gooey roasted vegetable pizza topped with prosciutto and arugula. • Grapefruit IPA: packed with a hoppy citrus kick, this IPA mixes perfectly with Buffalo wings and ranch, and celery and blue cheese. • Blood Orange Wit: the brewery’s freshest and best-selling brew is complemented by Barons’ pound cake with churro ice cream and dulce de leche caramel sauce. For more information and to purchase tickets, visit eventbrite.com. CITY SEEKS BUSINESSES FOR RECYCLING AWARD If your business or organization took steps to increase its recycling or reduce its waste in 2018, the City of San Diego wants to recognize your efforts. Beginning Jan. 9 through Friday, Feb. 8, applications are being accepted for the 2019 Business Waste Reduction and Recycling Award. Each year, the Environmental Services Department (ESD) recognizes businesses and organizations located within San Diego that have implemented or expanded innovative and successful waste reduction and recycling programs, as well as recycled product purchasing programs. Applicants with the most comprehensive, creative and/or improved recycling programs will receive the City’s Business Waste Reduction and Recycling Award. Top recyclers will be recognized at an awards ceremony in May 2019 at the San Diego Central Library. All applicants will be invited to the awards event. Applications can be downloaded at ESD’s website, completed online or by contacting Jennifer Hobbs at JHobbs@sandiego.gov or 858-492-5076. Applications are due by 5 p.m. on Friday, Feb. 8, 2019 and can be emailed or mailed to the City of San Diego, Environmental Services Department c/o Jennifer Hobbs, 9601 Ridgehaven Court, Suite 320, San Diego, CA 92123. OCEAN BEACH TOWN COUNCIL ELECTION The 2019 Ocean Beach Town Council board of directors election is approaching and letters of intent are now being accepted. If you would like to take your community involvement to the next level, here’s a great opportunity. By being an OBTC director you can be an elected voice in communicating the views and needs of the community to the appropriate agencies, be at the forefront of community discussions, take appropriate action on community issues and be a leader in promoting the general betterment of Ocean Beach. There are 15 seats on the Ocean Beach Town Council board of directors and OBTC members elect board directors for two-year terms. Half of the board stands for election every year. This year, eight seats are up for election. If you would like to be considered for candidacy, submit your candidate statement to: info@obtowncouncil.org by Jan. 21. Eligible candidates must be over 18 years of age, already be a paid-in-full OBTC member, and either live, work, own property, or operate a business in Ocean Beach (92107). Voting for this election will take place from Monday, Jan. 28 to Friday, Feb. 8. The Ocean Beach Town Council is a community-based nonprofit organization dedicated to expressing the will of Ocean Beach residents and representing the welfare of the community. For more information, contact info@obtowncouncil.org or visit obtowncouncil.org.
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    Tiger Woods commits to play at Farmers Insurance Open
    Jan 16, 2019 | 25544 views | 0 0 comments | 15 15 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Tiger Woods hits out of the rough on a fairway during his Sunday round at last year's Farmers Insurance Open. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    Tiger Woods hits out of the rough on a fairway during his Sunday round at last year's Farmers Insurance Open. / Photo by Thomas Melville
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    Tiger Woods, who capped off a dramatic comeback season with his 80th career PGA Tour victory at the Tour Championship in September, will start his 2019 campaign at Torrey Pines Golf Course. The seven-time winner of the Farmers Insurance Open has committed to play this year’s tournament Jan. 24-27, the Century Club of San Diego announced on Jan. 16. After being limited by back injuries to just two tournaments in the span of more than two full calendar years, Woods made a triumphant comeback in 2018, starting at Torrey Pines. He played 18 tournaments, securing 12 top-25 finishes and seven top-10s – including a pair of runner-up placings and his Tour Championship win, his first victory in more than five years. He finished T6 or better in The Open Championship and the PGA Championship and earned more than $5 million for just the second time in nine seasons. Woods won the Farmers Insurance Open in 1999, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008 and 2013, and earned his most recent major championship victory in a 19-hole playoff at the U.S. Open at Torrey Pines in 2008. In addition to his seven victories at the Farmers Insurance Open, the 80-time PGA TOUR winner has finished in the top 10 six other times in 16 appearances. He is the tournament’s all-time leading money winner, with $6,915,700. “We couldn’t be happier to have Tiger back in our field,” said Century Club of San Diego CEO Peter Ripa. “He really launched his fairytale comeback season right here last January, and he has enjoyed incredible success at Torrey Pines Golf Course and in our tournament over the years. It will be exciting to see him alongside many of the game’s other top players Jan. 24-27.” Until last year, Woods hadn’t played four complete rounds in the Farmers Insurance Open since his last victory here in 2013. After missing the cut during an abbreviated comeback in 2017, he advanced to the weekend last year by making birdie on his 18th hole Friday to make the cut on the number. Rounds of 70 and 72 Saturday and Sunday left him tied for 23rd. He would go on to secure top-10 finishes in the Valspar Championship, the Arnold Palmer Invitational, the Quicken Loans National, The Open Championship, the PGA Championship and the BMW Championship before his season-ending victory at East Lake. “This year as a whole was probably the most rewarding, because there was a point where I just didn't know if I would ever do this again,” Woods said before the Hero World Challenge in November.  “The expectations are much different this upcoming year. Now I know that I can do it, now it's just about managing and making sure I'm fresh for events, because I know I can win tournaments again.”  Twenty years ago, Woods captured his first title at the Farmers Insurance Open. It was his eighth victory on the PGA TOUR but carried extra significance because of the golf course on which he did it. “That was a big win for me because this was the first Tour event that my dad ever took me to, the old Andy Williams,” Woods said. “So for me that was a big deal to win a tournament my dad first took me to.” Woods joins a strong list of early commitments that includes defending champion and World No. 11 Jason Day, World No. 1 and defending FedExCup champion Justin Rose, No. 6 and San Diego native Xander Schauffele, 2017 Farmers Insurance Open winner and World No. 7 Jon Rahm, No. 8 Rory McIlroy, No. 10 Tony Finau, No. 13 Rickie Fowler, No. 15 Patrick Reed, No. 16 Marc Leishman, No. 18 Jordan Spieth, No. 19 Patrick Cantlay, No. 21 Alex Noren, No. 23 Gary Woodland and No. 30 Hideki Matsuyama.  Joining Fowler and Schauffele among San Diego products committed to the Farmers Insurance Open are Torrey Pines High School graduates Pat Perez and Jamie Lovemark, Poway product Charley Hoffman and San Diego State University alum J.J. Spaun. Joining Woods and Rahm as past tournament champions who have committed are Day (2018, 2015), Brandt Snedeker (2016, 2012), Scott Stallings (2014), Ben Crane (2010) and Nick Watney (2009). Young up-and-coming players to watch who have committed include PGA TOUR rookie and long-bomber Cameron Champ and 19-year-old Chilean sensation Joaquin Niemann. The field is not final until the commitment deadline on Friday, Jan. 18 at 5 p.m. ET. In addition to attracting some of the biggest names in the sport, the 2019 Farmers Insurance Open will also feature an array of specialty food and drink offerings showcasing the San Diego flavor and venues to entertain the 100,000-plus spectators who attend the four-day tournament. Areas open to the public include the Grey Goose 19th Hole, which will feature an elevated viewing deck that provides panoramic views of the course, a Pétanque course and specialty drinks including the signature cocktail, the “Torrey Breeze.” Other public areas of interest include the Michelob ULTRA Zone, where fans can enjoy happy hour specials starting at 3 p.m. Thursday through Saturday, and a DJ as part of the Post Party presented by Harrah’s Resort SoCal. Tickets for the 2019 Farmers Insurance Open are on sale and may be purchased at farmersinsuranceopen.com/tickets. Adult grounds tickets are $60, with upgraded VIP tickets starting at $90. With venues selling out last year, fans are encouraged to buy in advance. Discounted tickets are available for seniors, veterans, and youth 13-17. Tickets are complimentary for active duty military, reservists, retired military and dependents. Kids 12 and under are admitted free with a ticketed adult, with a maximum of four kids per adult.
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    Extensive upgrades to Point Loma High to begin next month
    by SCOTT HOPKINS
    Jan 15, 2019 | 8557 views | 0 0 comments | 15 15 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    This view from Chatsworth Boulevard shows what the new three-story building will look like. It will replace an outdated building that is to be demolished. At left is the current 200 Building and at right the current 300 Building, both of which are scheduled for renovation. /  Graphic: San Diego Unified School District
    This view from Chatsworth Boulevard shows what the new three-story building will look like. It will replace an outdated building that is to be demolished. At left is the current 200 Building and at right the current 300 Building, both of which are scheduled for renovation. / Graphic: San Diego Unified School District
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    A scheduled vote by the San Diego Unified School District Board of Education at its Feb. 12 meeting will award a construction contract setting in motion an ambitious modernization of buildings and other improvements on the Point Loma High campus. Following the vote, a notice to proceed will be issued by the district and work will begin. The improvements are being financed with Prop. S funds. One of the first targets on the 94-year-old campus is removal of a round building known as the 800 Building and visible from Chatsworth Boulevard. District architects and planners quickly noted several years ago the structure was outdated. The two-story edifice contains the school's valuable Media Center on the first floor and oddly-shaped classrooms on the second floor that radiate from a center room. The basement contains all of the site's electrical, telephone and computer connections known as the Main Distribution Frame. But despite all this, there are no restrooms in the structure. Moving of these will take place over the coming summer, temporarily removing the school from the electrical grid but with all services back in place for the 2019-20 school year, according to Principal Hans Becker. Teachers from the 800 Building will be moving to temporary classrooms located on the current basketball courts adjacent to the stadium, Becker said. Joining them will be teachers from the current 200 and 300 Buildings, both of which front Chatsworth Boulevard. and  are to be renovated. When that is completed, the 800 Building will be demolished. In its place a new three-story building will rise fronting Chatsworth Boulevard. The building will feature a new media center on the first floor and 10 state-of-the-art classrooms on each of the second and third floors. A multi-functional central outdoor space is also planned for student use. Also coming to Chatsworth Boulevard are new bus turnout spaces to allow for easier traffic flow plus reconfiguration of the main school parking lot on Clove Street, landscape and hardscape improvements, construction of new security enclosures, practice fields and technology upgrades. The district website shows completion of these projects in approximately 18 months. "I'm thinking realistically two school years," Becker said. "I don't see us moving in mid-year. I see delays and unexpected things, so in my mind's eye I'm thinking two years." That timetable would have staff and students occupying the new facilities in August 2021. District officials have studied predicted future student populations at PLHS and are planning these projects to serve those numbers. Current projects nearing completion are the installation of new bleachers in the main gym, installation of new security fencing along Chatsworth Boulevard and a new marquee due to be installed at the intersection of Chatsworth and Voltaire Street by the end of February. Planning for all these undertakings began several years ago with open meetings between district planning and architectural staff and the public. One of the first projects was the controversial lighting of Pete Ross Stadium. Some community members insisted the school's field would be rented out almost nightly to raise funds, causing horrendous noise and other injurious problems. A special field use agreement was adopted by the school board that limited night events at the stadium to 18 per year with lighting turned off by 7 p.m. nightly when student athletic teams are practicing. The district installed computer-aimed LED lighting that has very little spillage into nearby properties. Extra security was brought in on football game nights. Becker followed the agreement stringently, not violating the agreement once. He said  comments from nearby neighbors at mandated follow-up meetings after the first year of lighting resulted in positive feedback from the community.
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    All five rotary clubs in La Jolla – La Jolla Golden Triangle, La Jolla Rotary, La Jolla Sunrise, Rotary Club of Torrey Pines, and Rotary Club of San Diego Coastal – gathered Friday, Jan. 11 to list...
    Published - Sunday, January 20
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