News and community briefs for La Jolla
Published - 02/09/19 - 09:40 AM | 10835 views | 0 0 comments | 24 24 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Last week, after a heavy rainstorm, the sun peeked out to create a golden glow at sunset. / Photo by Don Balch
Last week, after a heavy rainstorm, the sun peeked out to create a golden glow at sunset. / Photo by Don Balch
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LA JOLLA VILLAGE DRIVE AT GENESEE AVENUE TO CLOSE

Starting Friday night, crews will close the east-west access of La Jolla Village Drive at Genesee Avenue in University City to set 60-foot-long concrete girders – weighing up to 200,000 pounds. Girders are large beams that will form the elevated guideway on which the Trolley will run.

The partial closures are scheduled as follows: 

Weekend closure from 9 p.m. on Feb. 8, to 5 a.m. on Feb. 11: 

• La Jolla Village Drive through lanes closed, right-hand turn onto northbound Genesee Avenue

• Southbound Genesee Avenue closed

• One lane open on northbound Genesee Avenue

Weekdays Monday, Feb. 11 to Thursday, Feb. 14, from 5 a.m. to 9 p.m. each day: 

·La Jolla Village Drive through lanes closed, right-hand turns onto Genesee maintained

·Two lanes open on southbound Genesee Avenue

·Two lanes open on northbound Genesee Avenue

Weeknights Monday, Feb. 11 to Friday, Feb. 15, from 9 p.m. to 5 a.m.: 

·La Jolla Village Drive through lanes closed, right-hand turn onto northbound Genesee Avenue

·Southbound Genesee Avenue closed

·One lane open on northbound Genesee Avenue

*These closures are subject to change 

To learn more, visit KeepSanDiegoMoving.com/MidCoast.

POLISH MAN MISSING IN LA JOLLA

Michal Marcin Krowczynski was reported missing on Jan. 18 while on vacation in the United States from Poland after he missed his scheduled flight back home. According to a SDPD report, his friends and family have been unable to reach him and are concerned for his welfare.

Krowczynski posted various photos of San Diego and La Jolla on his social media prior to his disappearance, and evidence believed to have belonged to him was recently recovered on the beach near Calumet Park. He is described as a white male, approximately 5-feet 9-inches tall, 180 pounds with brown hair and green eyes.

Anyone with information that related to seeing Krowczynski in the area is urged to contact the San Diego Police Department at 619-531-2000 or the Missing Persons Unit at 619-531-2277.

'LAW AND ORDER' ACTRESS ENGAGED IN LA JOLLA

“Law and Order” actress Elisabeth Röhm got engaged last week to retired judge Jonathan Colby.

“We’re overjoyed to share with everyone that we got engaged last week at our home in La Jolla, California,” Röhm told People magazine. (people.com/tv/elisabeth-rohm-engaged-to-judge-jonathan-colby/)

“In the privacy of our backyard, we shared our commitment to love each other forever as we took in the stunning ocean views at sunset. It was the most loving and romantic day of our lives with many tears of happiness,” she said.

LA JOLLA WOMAN WINS FILM FESTIVAL AWARD

Stacey Blanchet, who was recently featured in the La Jolla Village News for her documentary on Shari Belafonte, won an award for the film at the San Diego Black Film Festival. The film, titled “In the Know with Shari Belafonte,” won the film festival award for best documentary. 

HEMLOCK SOCIETY OF SAN DIEGO ANNOUNCES NEW PRESIDENT

Former La Jollan Faye Girsh, founder and current president of the Hemlock Society of San Diego, passed the reins to Barry Price of Allied Gardens. Girsh was president of the Hemlock Society USA following its founder, Derek Humphry. In 1987, she began the Hemlock Society of San Diego and was president from 1987 to 1996 and again from 2006 to 2019. She is also past-president of the World Federation of Right-to-Die Societies.

Girsh initiated the Caring Friends program at Hemlock, which has become the Final Exit Network, where she serves on the advisory board. She is also on the board of Euthanasia Research and Guidance Organization. For many years she was a board member and newsletter editor for the World Federation of Right-to-Die Societies and is past president.

Price assumed the role of president of the Hemlock Society of San Diego in January. Price’s teaching career includes 35 years teaching at three Texas universities. He earned two Fulbright Fellowships to teach and consult on public administration in Argentina and Uruguay and to teach and research in Nicaragua.

By offering food, we hope to ease the burden of other living expenses on affected individuals and families.

As long as the shutdown continues, we will be here to help! We can also assist with navigating additional resources. Please contact JFS Access by calling (858) 637-3210 or reach out to us online at sdcjc.org.

LA JOLLA PLANNING GROUP TRUSTEE ELECTION

La Jolla Community Planning Association (LJCPA), which makes land-use recommendations to the City, is seeking candidates for its annual trustee election in March 2019.

Nine open seats will be filled at the plan group’s election on Thursday, March 7.

To be eligible to be a candidate, an applicant must be associated with the community (resident, property owner, local business owner or local non-profit representative), join the LJCPA, and have attended at least three LJCPA meetings between March 2018 and February 2019.

There are two more opportunities to join LJCPA and meet the attendance requirement to be eligible to be a trustee candidate in March 2019. They are Jan. 3 and Feb. 7, 2019.

Becoming an LJCPA Trustee is challenging work and a great way to have your say in local building and infrastructure projects in La Jolla.

CONGRESS TO HOLD HEARING ON CLAIMS OF HUMAN RESEARCH AT LA JOLLA VA MEDICAL CENTER

After two whistleblowers made allegations of dangerous human research being conducted at VA Medical Center in La Jolla, congress announced that it will hold a hearing as early as spring, according to inewsource.org

The whistleblowers claim a former doctor and other higher-ups put the lives of veterans suffering from alcoholism and liver disease at risk for research that involved taking liver biopsies through a catheter in the neck. One patient was reportedly “oozing with blood” and needed an emergency transfusion after the procedure. The study, led by former San Diego VA division chief Dr. Samuel Ho took place between 2014 to 2016.

SCRIPPS CLINIC NAMED FIRST CENTER OF EXCELLENCE FOR TREATING PREVALENT HEART DISEASE

Scripps Clinic has been designated a Center of Excellence by the Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Association, becoming the first location in San Diego County to be recognized for outstanding treatment of this common genetic disease, which involves an abnormal thickening of the heart muscle.

HCM, which often goes undetected for decades, is the second most common form of heart muscle disease, affecting up to 1 million people in the United States and 1 in 300 in the general population. HCM often is inherited within families, and several gene mutations have been linked to the disease. The disease can affect children and adults of any age. In fact, HCM is the leading cause of sudden cardiac death in young competitive athletes, accounting for 36 percent of all cases, according to a study published by the journal Circulation in 2009.   

In HCM, the walls of the main pumping chamber of the heart (the left ventricle) become enlarged, restricting blood flow and sometimes causing leakage from the mitral valve and interruption of the heart’s electrical system. Symptoms can vary widely from chest pains, dizziness and irregular heart rhythms to more serious life-threatening conditions such as heart failure and sudden cardiac arrest.

Diagnosis can involve an echocardiogram (ultrasound imaging), an electrocardiogram (EKG) and blood tests. Treatments include beta-blocking drugs or other medications that slow the heartbeat, implantable cardioverter defibrillators, and surgery to remove heart muscle tissue blocking blood flow. For more information about the Scripps Clinic Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Program, visit scripps.org/hcm.

CARDIOVASCULAR CENTER LIGHTS UP IN RED FOR WOMEN

The Sulpizio Cardiovascular Center at UC San Diego Health, 9434 Medical Center Drive, will light up red for February as a part of the American Heart Association’s “Go Red for Women” campaign to bring awareness to heart disease, symptoms, and prevention.

Millions of Americans suffer from heart disease, which kills more women each year than all cancers combined. Approximately 6.6 million women have coronary heart disease and almost 64 percent of women who die suddenly of heart failure display no symptoms. For more information, visit health.ucsd.edu/heart or goredforwomen.org.

LITTLE MENSCHES EVENT FOR RADY CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL 

On Sunday, Feb. 10, children of the Little Mensches program at the Lawrence Family Jewish Community Center will be putting together activity kits for children currently staying at Rady Children’s Hospital. The kits will include coloring books, crayons, stickers and puzzles along with a video card for the children in the hospital to watch. For more information on the Little Mensches program and events, visit lfjcc.org. 

FIREFIGHTER BRENNAN KICKS OF DISTRICT 1 CAMPAIGN 

Aaron Brennan, a 17-year San Diego City firefighter, Navy reservist and longtime La Jolla resident, recently kicked off his campaign for San Diego City Council District 1 with a video announcement shared online. 

“I’m running for City Council because I believe in the fundamental idea of a government that serves the people and works for the betterment of our community,” he said in the announcement. "I’m running to do what ought to be done, but isn’t getting done, and to get the focus at City Hall back on truly serving the people.

MCALISTER INSTITUE RECIEVES $11K GRANT FROM LAS PATRONAS

McAlister Institute, a nonprofit organization that helps bring life-saving services in substance abuse treatment, mental health counseling, life skills education, and vocational training to individuals and families regardless of their inability to pay, recently received an $11,195 grant from Las Patronas.  

The grant is going to fund a wellness courtyard at the organization’s Kiva Learning Center for Women and Children, which receives its primary funding through contract with the County of San Diego’s Health and Human Services Agency. McAlister Institute became one of the first five organizations in the nation and the first in San Diego County to develop a residential program that allows women to live with their children in a safe, instructive, and supportive environment while they receive treatment.

The wellness courtyard will promote optimum health by supporting physical, emotional and spiritual wellness. Aligned with the County’s Live Well San Diego Initiative, the courtyard will address existing physical decline as well as offer a relapse prevention strategy through a fitness exercise station and mini-jogging path, which will offer residents an ongoing opportunity to exercise regularly to improve their physical health. 

Plans include an engraved sign within the courtyard to proudly display that it is named: “The Las Patronas Wellness Courtyard.” For more information about McAlister Institute, visit mcalisterinc.org. 

2018 TOP BABY NAMES

According to County Health and Human Services Agency, a total of 41,555 babies were born in San Diego County in 2018. Of those babies, 21,313 boys and 20,242 girls. Here are the top baby names parents chose for boys in 2018:

Liam (242), Noah (202), Sebastian (200), Mateo (196), Benjamin (185), Daniel (185), Ethan (172), Oliver (164), Alexander (162), and Logan (156).

Here are the top baby names parents chose for girls in 2018:

Emma (264), Olivia (235), Mia (223), Isabella (191), Camila (173), Sophia (159), Sofia (151), Victoria (147), Mila (138), and Charlotte (137).

H1N1 FLU VIRUS CIRCULATING SAN DIEGO

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported that Pandemic H1N1 is the main influenza virus making people sick both locally and across the nation. Last month, a 26-year-old reporter visiting San Diego from Washington, D.C. died, possibly due to Pandemic H1N1 complications. It is unknown whether the woman had underlying medical conditions and whether she had received a flu shot.

A 49-year-old local man with underlying medical conditions and unknown vaccination status was confirmed as a H1N1 death. The total influenza deaths to date this season are nine, compared to 44 deaths this time last season.  

“The recently reported deaths are a reminder that, regardless of your age, the best protection against any known strain of flu is getting vaccinated,” said Sayone Thihalolipavan, M.D., M.P.H., County deputy public health officer. “The current flu vaccine offers protection against Pandemic H1N1, influenza H3N2 and two strains of influenza B.”

Local and national flu reports show that adolescents and young to middle-aged adults are more affected than other age groups because of their weaker immune systems. In 2009, the CDC concluded that adults older than 60 years of age had a level of immunity that was not present in children and younger adults when the H1N1 pandemic hit that year.

In order to prevent the flu, the CDC recommends that everyone 6 months and older get a flu shot every year. The vaccine is safe and effective. It takes two weeks for immunity to develop. The flu vaccine is available at doctors’ offices, community clinics, and retail pharmacies. If you don’t have medical insurance, you can go to a County public health center to get vaccinated. For a list of locations, visit sdiz.org or call 2-1-1.
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